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Old November 18th, 2012, 03:23 PM   #41

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You went to Chatham?

Good heavens.

You know the dockyard used to house old nuclear submarines, rumour has it radiation leakage had some affect upon the locals.
Research suggests that you are correct.
Milcon Research and Consulting: Chatham an urban nuclear waste dump and a lasting legacy of the nuclear submarine programme
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Old November 18th, 2012, 03:24 PM   #42

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BBC Radio 3 - The Essay, The Writer's Dickens, Tessa Hadley on Rooms and Reality

1 of 5

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Tessa Hadley on Rooms and Reality
The Writer's Dickens Episode 1 of 5
AVAILABILITY:OVER A YEAR LEFT TO LISTEN
Duration: 15 minutes
First broadcast: Monday 19 December 2011
Five contemporary novelists examine the craft of Dickens' prose, and reflect on how the giant of British nineteenth century fiction is both a role model and a shadow looming over their own writing. Taking as their starting point a favourite extract from one of Dickens' novels, each writer discuss Dickens' themes, narrative techniques and writing craft, and tells us what they themselves have learnt from it. They offer thoughtful, unusually engaged and focussed critical appreciation of Dickens' skill, as well as valuable insights into their own work and how they themselves wrestle with the subject and technique under discussion.

Beginning the series is Tessa Hadley, writing on Rooms and Reality. Taking as her starting point the description of the Clenham's house in Little Dorritt, she explores how Dickens paints the reality of his world through his characters' houses, and reflects on how significant houses are her own writing.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 03:33 PM   #43

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Half the ships at Trafalgar were built there, it's a pity a town with such a legacy has become a chav infested wasteland. My family have been sailors in the area for a few generations, some even worked on those nuke subs (probably the ones who tipped the waste). I can't say I'm proud of what's become of the town though, it really is quite awful and not just from a petty snobbish outlook. Prostitutes, drunks, druggies, slappers, chavs who've got more gold than Mr T and young mothers who openly swear at their small children. The people would probably be rejected by Jeremy Kyle.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 06:07 PM   #44

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Originally Posted by Earl_of_Rochester View Post
You went to Chatham?

Good heavens.

You know the dockyard used to house old nuclear submarines, rumour has it radiation leakage had some affect upon the locals.
Well, my husband worked at Chatham Dockyard when he was young, perhaps radiation affected him. That would explain a lot.
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Old November 18th, 2012, 06:13 PM   #45

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Interesting post. Theatre was certainly more vivid, varied and involved in Victorian times. There was more life out there in towns and villages than today. It seems drama was found on stage and off such as living with death, bereavement and ill health or struggling to make a living. Life may have been humdrum for many back then but it had colour and vitality which lifted the spirits. By comparison we're rather insulated and sheltered nowadays even if more aware.
I think what you say is very true.. Most people's lives were harder, but they enjoyed their more limited leisure time more intensely. People got out and did things more than we do, and with no TV etc there were more exciting and varied forms of live entertainment than we have.
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Old December 27th, 2012, 10:35 AM   #46

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One of the most important authors in history for bringing the suffering of the poor to the attention of the ruling classes, an amazing man (although I doubt his wife would think so).

Plus he practically invented Christmas
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