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Old November 19th, 2012, 04:57 AM   #11

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By Royal Appointment!
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10% opium, 12% alcohol, sugar. Keeps the brats quiet!
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Old November 19th, 2012, 05:54 AM   #12

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Is this true? I've come across rumors that she used drugs, but that's all they seem to be, rumors. What is your reference?
She certainly did like her drink, though she didn't as far as I know drink to excess. There are mentions of her drinking. Once for instance when she was going out accompanied by John Brown a lady in waiting asked if they were taking tea, to which Brown replied 'No, her majesty don't much like tea. We take out biscuits and spirits.'. One of her attendants said:

'She has for many years contented herself with a small portion of Scotch whisky, which is distilled expressly for her at the small distillery of John Begg, and which is carefully mixed by her personal attendant with either Apollinaris, soda or lithia water.'

She was tolerant of heavy drinking among the servants at Balmoral. Alan Hardy quotes from Fritz Ponsonby's Recollections of Three Reigns:

Before my day there were what were called 'larders'. The stags that had been shotnduring the day were taken from their lards and placed in a row and all the gillies carried torches. The Queen came out after dinner and dancing took place, all of which was very pretty, but after she left it became an orgy of drinking.

Another occasion when whiskey ran freely was on the anniversary of the Prince Consort's birthday. All the stalkers, gillies, and people on the estate were expected to attend dressed in top-hats and black coats. A prayer was said in front of the Prince Consort's statue, and the Queen drove there in her carriage with two grey horses and an outrider. Then whiskey was sent out as a light refreshment at the back of the wood. The result was that the whole community was three parts intoxicated and when we went for a walk in the afternoon it was no uncommon sight to find a man in a top hat and frockcoat fast asleep in the woods.

The result of all this was a curious reversal of roles. When the worldly gourmet Edward VII came to the throne he found it necessary to institute thorough going reforms to stamp out the excessive drinking his supposedly strait-laced mother had made no effort to curb.
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Old November 19th, 2012, 11:10 AM   #13

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Aside from Albert's death, the problems with her mother and children made the queen go into seclusion. There are rumors about John Brown being intimate with Queen Victoria and helping her regain her motivation, but that has not been proven. So, what made her bounce back?
Time is a great healer?
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Old November 19th, 2012, 03:33 PM   #14

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She certainly did like her drink, though she didn't as far as I know drink to excess. There are mentions of her drinking. Once for instance when she was going out accompanied by John Brown a lady in waiting asked if they were taking tea, to which Brown replied 'No, her majesty don't much like tea. We take out biscuits and spirits.'. One of her attendants said:

'She has for many years contented herself with a small portion of Scotch whisky, which is distilled expressly for her at the small distillery of John Begg, and which is carefully mixed by her personal attendant with either Apollinaris, soda or lithia water.'

She was tolerant of heavy drinking among the servants at Balmoral. Alan Hardy quotes from Fritz Ponsonby's Recollections of Three Reigns:

Before my day there were what were called 'larders'. The stags that had been shotnduring the day were taken from their lards and placed in a row and all the gillies carried torches. The Queen came out after dinner and dancing took place, all of which was very pretty, but after she left it became an orgy of drinking.

Another occasion when whiskey ran freely was on the anniversary of the Prince Consort's birthday. All the stalkers, gillies, and people on the estate were expected to attend dressed in top-hats and black coats. A prayer was said in front of the Prince Consort's statue, and the Queen drove there in her carriage with two grey horses and an outrider. Then whiskey was sent out as a light refreshment at the back of the wood. The result was that the whole community was three parts intoxicated and when we went for a walk in the afternoon it was no uncommon sight to find a man in a top hat and frockcoat fast asleep in the woods.

The result of all this was a curious reversal of roles. When the worldly gourmet Edward VII came to the throne he found it necessary to institute thorough going reforms to stamp out the excessive drinking his supposedly strait-laced mother had made no effort to curb.
Boy, the private life of the queen would have kept modern tabloids going for years.
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Old November 19th, 2012, 03:34 PM   #15

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Time is a great healer?
Yeah, I suppose this is another factor.
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Old November 19th, 2012, 04:40 PM   #16

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From what I read about her I found she was a very depressing person I have a book on her journals that she had written and the lady liked to be depressing.
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Old November 19th, 2012, 06:00 PM   #17
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Re laudinum and other drugs in Victorian times Sameul Taylor Coleridge wrote his classic poem ''Chritabel'' under the influence of opium whose use was widespread among the bohemian writing poetry set in Victorian times.
Similarly , the Victorian literary equivalent of Irvine Welsh's heroin junkies classic novel set in Edinburgh-''Trainspotting'' was Thomas De Quincey's'' Confessions of an English Opium Eater''-Like Welsh De Quincey lived for a time in Edinburgh ( I watched De Quincey's tenement home in Edinburgh's Lothian Street, beng demolished in 1970.
Re Queen Victorian her long self imposed exile was so reasented by the masses that Republicanism was a growing cult in Britain post Albert's death.
It was Conservative Prime Minister Disraeli (who famously said-''As far as royalty is concerned. one should lay flattery on with a trowel'') and he did by creating Victoria Empress of India and having elaborate public celebrations to mark the event.
It was this move by Disraeli that brought Victoria back fully into the public eys and gradual public adulation-in contrast to the deep unpopularity of herself and the monarchy in the 1860's early 70's..
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Old November 19th, 2012, 07:46 PM   #18

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From what I read about her I found she was a very depressing person I have a book on her journals that she had written and the lady liked to be depressing.
She had her morbid moments, but she also had a great sense of humour and enjoyed being amused. Lots of things entertained her.
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Old November 19th, 2012, 10:59 PM   #19
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Thumbs up devoted to male figures


One male figure to whom Victoria was not devoted was William Ewart Gladstone of whom she said ''He -Gladstone-addresses me as though I were a public meeting!''
Her first uber male mentor was, Whig Lord Melbourne, who was kind towards her when her Uncle King William IV died in 1837 thus leaving Victoria to become Queen.
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