Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > European History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

European History European History Forum - Western and Eastern Europe including the British Isles, Scandinavia, Russia


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old November 24th, 2012, 07:35 AM   #1
Citizen
 
Joined: Jul 2012
From: Earth
Posts: 40
Help regarding my ancestors from Bohemia


I am trying to work out the ethnicity/Nationality some of my ancestors were.
maybe you can help me out.

They were born around the 1860s in Bohemia then apart of the Austrian Empire now Czech Republic in the 1880s they moved to Vienna Austria and stayed there.

some of their names were

Johann Weinar/ Vejnar

Franz Nadvornik

Anna Haman

Maria Petera

other surnames were, Burda, Peceny, Petera, Jansa
ALL had German first names

What nationality or ethnicity so you think they were?
prussianwolf is offline  
Remove Ads
Old November 24th, 2012, 08:24 AM   #2

arras's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Apr 2010
From: Slovakia
Posts: 14,335

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
Johann Weinar/ Vejnar
German.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
Franz Nadvornik
Slavic. "Dvor" mean "yard" (nex to a house) and "na" means "on". So something like "on yard man".

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
Anna Haman
No idea, are you sure you wrote it right? But more German than Czech I guess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
Maria Petera
Also very strange name. "Peter" means in Slavic same as in English, just pronounced differently. "a" would make it feminine. However proper feminine from "Peter" in Slavic is "Petra" (common female name).

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
Burda
Slavic I guess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
Peceny
Slavic. Means "baked".

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
Petera
As I said very strange, but probably Slavic. If you got it right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
Jansa
Not sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
German first names
That does not mean much. Depending on official custom, first names could have been written in one form or another. Official document form does not indicate nationality in those times. Those people could have been Czechs but because Bohemia was under Hapsburgs, their names could have been written in German form on official documents like birth certificates. And so Jn could have been written as Johan, František as Franz, Anna and Maria are same both in German and Czech.

Last edited by arras; November 24th, 2012 at 08:29 AM.
arras is online now  
Old November 24th, 2012, 08:34 AM   #3

Yḥānān's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Feb 2012
From: Portugal
Posts: 2,686

Quote:
Originally Posted by arras View Post


Also very strange name. "Peter" means in Slavic same as in English, just pronounced differently. "a" would make it feminine. However proper feminine from "Peter" in Slavic is "Petra" (common female name).





As I said very strange, but probably Slavic. If you got it right.

The surname Petera exists just Google it.
Yḥānān is offline  
Old November 24th, 2012, 08:42 AM   #4

arras's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Apr 2010
From: Slovakia
Posts: 14,335

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yḥānān View Post
The surname Petera exists just Google it.
Gave me very few results. But yes, apparently there are few people with this surname in Bohemia and Slovakia.

Still, very unusual name for this region.
arras is online now  
Old November 24th, 2012, 08:43 AM   #5
Citizen
 
Joined: Jul 2012
From: Earth
Posts: 40

Haman is related to the surname hamann so i have been told.
Haman is a common surname in bohemia.

Would them moving to Lower Austria indicate they in some way associated with German Austrian culture ?
prussianwolf is offline  
Old November 24th, 2012, 08:52 AM   #6

arras's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Apr 2010
From: Slovakia
Posts: 14,335

Quote:
Originally Posted by prussianwolf View Post
Would them moving to Lower Austria indicate they in some way associated with German Austrian culture ?
It does not indicate their original nationality. People could resettle freely around whole Austro-Hungarian empire and indeed many did, most of them for simple economic reasons.

However they could assimilate once in Austria.

If your ancestors have Czech surnames, they clearly comes from Czech origins. There is no other way they could obtain Czech names otherwise. Some of their male ancestors had to be Czechs.

However in case of those concrete people whom you mentioned, surname does not indicate what ethnicity they were. Just origin somewhere in the past.

What is quit sure is that you have some Czech blood. Hard to say how much however.
arras is online now  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > European History

Tags
ancestors, bohemia


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What our ancestors did for us SPERRO General History 12 March 8th, 2012 09:22 PM
Ancestors! Ginner General History 11 March 2nd, 2011 07:49 AM
Hus and Bohemia wer Medieval and Byzantine History 32 August 24th, 2010 05:58 PM
Bohemia - can someone point me in the right direction please? pj812 European History 3 July 20th, 2010 11:09 AM
Who were your ancestors? Jomsvikingr General History 55 October 15th, 2009 06:36 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.