Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > European History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

European History European History Forum - Western and Eastern Europe including the British Isles, Scandinavia, Russia


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old November 27th, 2012, 12:19 PM   #1

Pacific_Victory's Avatar
SEMISOMNVS
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: MARE PACIFICVM
Posts: 4,883
Tsarist Russia


Is it just me or has there been a serious lack of discussion regarding Russia during the Imperial period?

You can't swing a dead cat around here without knocking into a Soviet thread and I think it's time we began a serious discussion about its predecessor.
Well the Cold War is all well and good, but certainly there must be a few more students of pre-20th century Imperialism around here somewhere, yeah?

So let us turn our eyes to the land of snow and shadows for a few moments.

Being an avid reader of all things Napoleonic, I would like to start with the age of Tsar Alexander I.

A strange combination of Western and Eastern European, his personal philosophy and style of governance seems to have been a contradictory mashing together of enlightened absolutism and traditional Russian feudalism. At times an almost all-powerful ruler and at others little more than a hostage to the Russian nobility, he would nonetheless go on to have an enormous impact on history.

By the end of his reign, the specter of France and Bonaparte had vanished from the Earth, and every power in Europe would be nervously looking over their shoulders at the Slavic giant in the East, worrying that if its great hordes were to break loose it would mark disaster for Europe. This attitude was a foreshadow of attitudes which continued well into the 20th century.

Please share anything you know about Alexander I, or if you have a different Tsar you prefer please share a bit about him/her with us.

All other contributions relating to the Russian Empire are welcome. Let us celebrate or dessicate the Double Headed Eagle as avidly as we do the Hammer and Sickle!
Pacific_Victory is offline  
Remove Ads
Old November 27th, 2012, 12:32 PM   #2

f0ma's Avatar
Scholar
 
Joined: Sep 2012
From: 英国
Posts: 805
Blog Entries: 8

I actually really enjoy Tsarist Russian history. I studied the Russian revolution twice and found it very interesting. I also have a penchant for the Crimean War. I'm afraid I don't know much about Alexander I, just a little on Alexander II and Alexander III. Alexander II is famous for emancipating the serfs and embarking on a program of reformation, whilst Alexander III was a counter-reformer, pretty much undoing all of his predecessor's work.

What I'd really like to discuss though is Russian expansion into the Far East, if there is anyone willing. I'm acquainted with late nineteenth century expansion, but I'd be interested in learning about Russia's Far East in the centuries prior. Though I'm not sure if that's appropriate discussion for the European History sub-forum
f0ma is offline  
Old November 27th, 2012, 12:35 PM   #3
Academician
 
Joined: Nov 2012
Posts: 67

I have studied a good amount about Alexander II
As he is the one who freed the surfs and really began to change Russia

It is so ironic how he was assassinated in hopes to give the Russian people more freedom and then Alexander III comes in with his extremely conservative policies.
Waxhax is offline  
Old November 27th, 2012, 12:37 PM   #4

Pacific_Victory's Avatar
SEMISOMNVS
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: MARE PACIFICVM
Posts: 4,883

Quote:
Originally Posted by f0ma View Post
I actually really enjoy Tsarist Russian history. I studied the Russian revolution twice and found it very interesting. I also have a penchant for the Crimean War. I'm afraid I don't know much about Alexander I, just a little on Alexander II and Alexander III. Alexander II is famous for emancipating the serfs and embarking on a program of reformation, whilst Alexander III was a counter-reformer, pretty much undoing all of his predecessor's work.

What I'd really like to discuss though is Russian expansion into the Far East, if there is anyone willing. I'm acquainted with late nineteenth century expansion, but I'd be interested in learning about Russia's Far East in the centuries prior. Though I'm not sure if that's appropriate discussion for the European History sub-forum
Well Russia has always been sitting in both camps so to speak, as far as Europe/Asia is concerned, so I think it should be alright.

As for Russian expansion into the Far East I'm certainly willing to explore that. I wonder if it has any parallels to the westward expansion of the United States.

Considering the Russian supposedly began in Muscovy, they've made it an awfully long way to Kamchatka.

Does anyone know what views the various Tsars held regarding eastward expansion?
Pacific_Victory is offline  
Old November 27th, 2012, 12:38 PM   #5

Pacific_Victory's Avatar
SEMISOMNVS
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: MARE PACIFICVM
Posts: 4,883

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waxhax View Post
I have studied a good amount about Alexander II
As he is the one who freed the surfs and really began to change Russia

It is so ironic how he was assassinated in hopes to give the Russian people more freedom and then Alexander III comes in with his extremely conservative policies.
To be honest, I know absolutely nothing about Alexander the II or III. Perhaps you and the poster above you can provide us with some more detailed insight. I know I would appreciate it.
Pacific_Victory is offline  
Old November 27th, 2012, 12:38 PM   #6

astafjevs's Avatar
Scholar
 
Joined: Oct 2012
From: Bristol, England
Posts: 765

I recently read Russia: A Thousand Year History of the Wild East by Martin Sixsmith, which I found fascinating.

Peter the Great is my favourite Tsar. He came to England and worked in a shipyard to learn Naval design skills. You just don't get Tsars like that anymore. Or Oligarchs.
astafjevs is offline  
Old November 27th, 2012, 12:40 PM   #7

Pacific_Victory's Avatar
SEMISOMNVS
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: MARE PACIFICVM
Posts: 4,883

Quote:
Originally Posted by astafjevs View Post
I recently read Russia: A Thousand Year History of the Wild East by Martin Sixsmith, which I found fascinating.

Peter the Great is my favourite Tsar. He came to England and worked in a shipyard to learn Naval design skills. You just don't get Tsars like that anymore. Or Oligarchs.
I've heard that too. From what I understand he was the first Tsar to take an interest in expanding the Russian Navy.

Wasn't he also the first to declare it a Russian Empire? and take all of the Imperial trappings that went along with that claim?

I seem to remember reading something about Alexander I being insulted by Napoleon's Imperial claims, calling him jumped up etc., which was ironic considering that his own predecessor, Peter, essentially did the same thing by declaring himself Emperor.

Last edited by Pacific_Victory; November 27th, 2012 at 12:46 PM.
Pacific_Victory is offline  
Old November 27th, 2012, 12:44 PM   #8

funakison's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Oct 2012
From: Between a rock and a hard place
Posts: 3,394
Blog Entries: 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by f0ma View Post
I actually really enjoy Tsarist Russian history. I studied the Russian revolution twice and found it very interesting. I also have a penchant for the Crimean War. I'm afraid I don't know much about Alexander I, just a little on Alexander II and Alexander III. Alexander II is famous for emancipating the serfs and embarking on a program of reformation, whilst Alexander III was a counter-reformer, pretty much undoing all of his predecessor's work.

What I'd really like to discuss though is Russian expansion into the Far East, if there is anyone willing. I'm acquainted with late nineteenth century expansion, but I'd be interested in learning about Russia's Far East in the centuries prior. Though I'm not sure if that's appropriate discussion for the European History sub-forum

i see you wish to discuss the playing of the great game, by all means open a thread.
funakison is offline  
Old November 27th, 2012, 12:52 PM   #9

astafjevs's Avatar
Scholar
 
Joined: Oct 2012
From: Bristol, England
Posts: 765

I reckon there is a good case for arguing that Alexander III suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; He witnessed his father's gruesome assasination, and then basically reversed every sensible policy his father had pursued. I see him as a tragic figure, holed up in his castle while the revolutionaries and anarchists begin to steal his country from him, which of course eventually cost his son and his life and ended the dynasty.

All supposition, of course.

I also don't believe the emancipation of the serfs in 1861 was as great a benefit as you might think. The serfs basically went from being dirt-poor people tied to their land, to being dirt-poor people with no jobs. I would welcome a Russian view on that, and if I am off the mark please tell me so.

The Eastern Expansions were basically a 'rolling back' of the Mongol conquests. I don't see them so much as a period of great exploration such as the American westward expansion, because there was no real sense of going into the unknown involved. Again, I'd like to be corrected if I've got that wrong.
astafjevs is offline  
Old November 27th, 2012, 01:02 PM   #10

Pacific_Victory's Avatar
SEMISOMNVS
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: MARE PACIFICVM
Posts: 4,883

Quote:
Originally Posted by astafjevs View Post
I reckon there is a good case for arguing that Alexander III suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; He witnessed his father's gruesome assasination, and then basically reversed every sensible policy his father had pursued. I see him as a tragic figure, holed up in his castle while the revolutionaries and anarchists begin to steal his country from him, which of course eventually cost his son and his life and ended the dynasty.

All supposition, of course.

I also don't believe the emancipation of the serfs in 1861 was as great a benefit as you might think. The serfs basically went from being dirt-poor people tied to their land, to being dirt-poor people with no jobs. I would welcome a Russian view on that, and if I am off the mark please tell me so.
That's the way I understand it as well. Apparently I need to do my research on Alexander II.

Quote:
The Eastern Expansions were basically a 'rolling back' of the Mongol conquests. I don't see them so much as a period of great exploration such as the American westward expansion, because there was no real sense of going into the unknown involved. Again, I'd like to be corrected if I've got that wrong.
Wasn't a lot of this done under Catherine the Great? Or am I confused?
Pacific_Victory is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > European History

Tags
russia, tsarist


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Russia or USA? Cavanboy Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology 229 July 29th, 2014 12:25 AM
Why Russia? Magnate European History 465 March 7th, 2014 01:16 PM
Why is Russia so big? lokariototal European History 46 March 3rd, 2011 05:58 AM
Russia Mariyka Khetagurova European History 236 April 2nd, 2010 07:52 AM
***RUSSIA**** Anton_Drexler History Help 10 March 8th, 2010 05:00 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.