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Old December 6th, 2012, 03:33 PM   #21

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Brits are as much European as Japanese are Asian...
Try telling them that!
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Old December 6th, 2012, 03:51 PM   #22

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Dutch Graaf, similar to Count comes via Latin gravius, something of an imperial magistrate from Greek grapheus, or writer. The Dutch ecquivalent to Duke is Hertog, which comes from harja (army) and teuhan (to pull), possibly a direct translation from Greek strategos which comes from stratos (army) and agein (to lead).
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Old December 6th, 2012, 05:59 PM   #23

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As Edward said, there was no noble titles in the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania except for few famillies who were allowed to use the titles of princes, mostly because they were descendants of ruling houses such as Rurik dynasty of Kiev Russ.

Instead of titles they used the names of their offices. The political system was to some extent modeled after Roman Republic, so it was a great honor to be the senator of the Republic. Or to be hetman or Grand Hetman, which was Polish-Lithuanian equivalent of western european field marshal.
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Old December 7th, 2012, 02:28 PM   #24

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Venice's patrician class didn't have different titles - everyone was just called a nobilomo (Nobilis homo in latin, written as N. H. ) which simply means noble man.

Obviously the various patrician families weren't equal in richness and real power, but legally everyone had the same right to vote, to the point that there was a class of decayed poor patricians who generally sold their vote ( the so called Barnabotti)
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Old December 7th, 2012, 02:41 PM   #25

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Well I'm out of my depth here, if there is one thing that you Europeans (and I know, supposedly you Brits aren't European - but for the purpose of this thread your titles and nobility are every bit as confusing as the Continental ones)
You don't have to put disclaimers on it. Britain is European and it is also its own culture, just like every single other European nation is European as well as its own culture.
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Old December 7th, 2012, 02:44 PM   #26

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As Edward said, there was no noble titles in the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania except for few famillies who were allowed to use the titles of princes, mostly because they were descendants of ruling houses such as Rurik dynasty of Kiev Russ.
.
Extremely enlightened for the 17th century, no?
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Old December 7th, 2012, 02:51 PM   #27

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Extremely enlightened for the 17th century, no?
The nobles still ruled. And it wasn't exactly because of egalitarian reasons, but more on account of monopolistic reasons instituted by the ruling nobles, while noble titles in the same period in the rest of Europe flourished and expanded exactly because the titles devaluated and could be bought and contained less real power.
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Old December 7th, 2012, 02:59 PM   #28

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Ardri or Ardrigh was the Irish name for a high-king , ard meaning high
Pendragon was used in Wales , but did not mean high king , but just high leader
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Old December 8th, 2012, 12:49 AM   #29

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If I am not mistaken some nobility titles have not been mentioned as :
Prince, Marquis / Marquess, Chevalier (Knight), Seigneur (Sire), Vidame, Ecuyer,...
In France, the title should be only used by the oldest son. In some cases, the other brothers may have another title (oldest : Count, others : Baron), or may use a courtesy title adding the first name : for instance the eldest son has the title of Count of X, and a brother will use the courtesy title Count Michel of X.
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Old December 8th, 2012, 03:23 AM   #30

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What about Spanish titles, does anyone know anything about them?
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