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Old December 11th, 2012, 09:07 AM   #1

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Europe:Early modern period (1350-1789, roughly).


In what ways did the people in this time period becoming more like us in terms of education(attitude towards knowledge), Religion(Attitudes towards it and its interaction with major events), and politics (International and domestic)?

Europe: include russia!


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Old December 11th, 2012, 09:10 AM   #2

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is this homework?
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Old December 11th, 2012, 09:15 AM   #3

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No. I read this book called the Leviathan (not the famous leviathan), and it made me think of the ways we are different or the same with the people in the past
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Old December 11th, 2012, 09:18 AM   #4

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We're more or less exactly the same, although some of us are lucky enough to be less preoccupied with the food supply than we would have been in the Middle Ages. For now, at least.
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Old December 11th, 2012, 09:20 AM   #5

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The reason I choose the time period 1350-1789 is because when you go back more, you can clearly see the difference, and go beyond 1800, well thats around the time of the industrial age. So i picked the time period of the scientific revolution, reformation,etc...
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Old December 11th, 2012, 11:56 AM   #6

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To me, period primary alludes to Paradox's EU3 timeline :P
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Old December 11th, 2012, 03:25 PM   #7

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glowin View Post
To me, period primary alludes to Paradox's EU3 timeline :P
Ahhh, yes - one of the greatest games to ever grace my computer.
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Old December 12th, 2012, 08:20 AM   #8
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Ahhh, yes - the Internet. Early modern history in 25 words or less.
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Old December 12th, 2012, 08:34 AM   #9

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The most important aspect is probably the appearance of the idea of progress, historically and socially. That the world wasn't static, god-given or cyclic, and that it could be changed by humans actively working for change, and that this was even an option to begin with.

There is somewhat of a disagreement precisely when this idea became widespread and generally accepted by the majority in the Western world (from the renaissance onwards), but it is safe to say that it occurred within the timespan listed in the title of this thread, and that it has been the foundation upon which the modern world was created.
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Old December 12th, 2012, 11:57 AM   #10

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Mobility was limited so most common people, particularly peasants, lived their entire lives within a small radius of where they were born. Their interactions with other people were limited and restricted to such occasions as market days, visiting dignitaries, armies passing through. There were a few outlets like the army, the church, craftsmanship, merchants, living in towns, that provided opportunities to some people and bring them in contact with other groups, other ideas and knowledge of different ways of life. But in the whole it was traditions that dominated daily life. Even concepts like national identity and national language probably didn't play a major part, just the notions of us and the others. Individualism was limited to the wealthy, the poserful and the adventurer. Over the period the outer world would increasingly impinge on the narrower world, largely through commercial enterprise or extending political domination so that by the end of this period European society at least was ready for a revolutionary change.
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