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Old April 9th, 2013, 08:48 AM   #1

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Lord George Gordon & the "Gordon Riots"


In reading my current book, I came across a passage about
Lord George Gordon and the Gordon Riots in 1780.
Click the image to open in full size.
The book mentions that Charles Dickens used this event to write "Barnaby Rudge".
I've never heard of the man or the riot. What's the story behind all this?
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Old April 9th, 2013, 09:00 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by tjadams View Post
In reading my current book, I came across a passage about
Lord George Gordon and the Gordon Riots in 1780.
Click the image to open in full size.
The book mentions that Charles Dickens used this event to write "Barnaby Rudge".
I've never heard of the man or the riot. What's the story behind all this?
It was Catholic Emancipation that caused the riots(the rioters being against Catholic Emancipation). Giving Catholics the vote, allowing them to hold office etc. They were no small scale matter and lasted for quite a few days. The rioters won and Catholic Emancipation was put off until the 19th century.

Gordon himself survived the aftermath of the riots. I was about to say that Gordon was involved in something controversial again later in his life, the details of which I cant remember. Googling it has brought the fact up again - he converted to Judaism. This was more or less unheard of during this time.

Last edited by jackydee; April 9th, 2013 at 09:05 AM.
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Old April 9th, 2013, 09:10 AM   #3

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[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_George_Gordon]Lord George Gordon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Riots]Gordon Riots - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

Sorry for being lazy, but these might help.
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Old April 9th, 2013, 09:50 AM   #4

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He was a typical (or rather, untypical) aristocratic nutcase. A contemporary life of him:
http://ia701201.us.archive.org/21/it...orge00wats.pdf
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Old April 9th, 2013, 09:51 AM   #5

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Originally Posted by jackydee View Post
It was Catholic Emancipation that caused the riots(the rioters being against Catholic Emancipation). Giving Catholics the vote, allowing them to hold office etc. They were no small scale matter and lasted for quite a few days. The rioters won and Catholic Emancipation was put off until the 19th century.

Gordon himself survived the aftermath of the riots. I was about to say that Gordon was involved in something controversial again later in his life, the details of which I cant remember. Googling it has brought the fact up again - he converted to Judaism. This was more or less unheard of during this time.
England suffered Catholic terror only 3 years and I think queen Bloody Mary executed far less people than her father. So why English hated Roman Catholics so much?
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Old April 9th, 2013, 10:05 AM   #6

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England suffered Catholic terror only 3 years and I think queen Bloody Mary executed far less people than her father. So why English hated Roman Catholics so much?
It was far longer than that and far worse.

Bloody Mary
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Old April 9th, 2013, 10:58 AM   #7

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England suffered Catholic terror only 3 years and I think queen Bloody Mary executed far less people than her father. So why English hated Roman Catholics so much?
Because Britain became a Protestant country, now in the period (or rather before)it was a very big deal to be a Catholic in a Protestant country or visa versa. Both faiths could be pretty intolerant of each other.

Last edited by Kevinmeath; April 9th, 2013 at 11:58 AM.
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Old April 9th, 2013, 11:48 AM   #8
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England suffered Catholic terror only 3 years and I think queen Bloody Mary executed far less people than her father. So why English hated Roman Catholics so much?
As has been said, it was more than 3 years. The numbers executed is not the only point. The reasons for execution being just as important. Under Mary quite a number were executed purely for religious belief. This happened far less under Elizabeth I, at least initially. Around this time England also had the St Batholomew's Day massacre in France to warn her of the dangers of being Protestant in a Catholic dominated country.

As well as the above the Pope also found time to write a Papal Bull calling for the assassination of Elizabeth I, and infiltrated the country with Priests who's job it was not only to preach religion but also to organize Elizabeth I downfall. Add to this the Spanish Armada and the Guy Fawkes plot and you have an England who's whole being was linked to anti-Catholicism.

Of course the above is only one side of the story, but it is the anti-catholic version of our history which lead to England's distrust of Catholicism. Very rarely did both sides live in harmony anywhere in Europe.
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Old April 9th, 2013, 12:13 PM   #9

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As has been said, it was more than 3 years. The numbers executed is not the only point. The reasons for execution being just as important. Under Mary quite a number were executed purely for religious belief. This happened far less under Elizabeth I, at least initially. Around this time England also had the St Batholomew's Day massacre in France to warn her of the dangers of being Protestant in a Catholic dominated country.

As well as the above the Pope also found time to write a Papal Bull calling for the assassination of Elizabeth I, and infiltrated the country with Priests who's job it was not only to preach religion but also to organize Elizabeth I downfall. Add to this the Spanish Armada and the Guy Fawkes plot and you have an England who's whole being was linked to anti-Catholicism.

Of course the above is only one side of the story, but it is the anti-catholic version of our history which lead to England's distrust of Catholicism. Very rarely did both sides live in harmony anywhere in Europe.
Think that about sums it up. In Ireland it was the same and bad things happened on both sides but the fear of the Protestants was always there as they were vastly outnumbered. 1641 was their St Bartholomew's. 1688,1798 and the 1800s were also bad times.
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Old April 9th, 2013, 12:27 PM   #10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jackydee View Post
As has been said, it was more than 3 years. The numbers executed is not the only point. The reasons for execution being just as important. Under Mary quite a number were executed purely for religious belief. This happened far less under Elizabeth I, at least initially. Around this time England also had the St Batholomew's Day massacre in France to warn her of the dangers of being Protestant in a Catholic dominated country.

As well as the above the Pope also found time to write a Papal Bull calling for the assassination of Elizabeth I, and infiltrated the country with Priests who's job it was not only to preach religion but also to organize Elizabeth I downfall. Add to this the Spanish Armada and the Guy Fawkes plot and you have an England who's whole being was linked to anti-Catholicism.

Of course the above is only one side of the story, but it is the anti-catholic version of our history which lead to England's distrust of Catholicism. Very rarely did both sides live in harmony anywhere in Europe.
Thank you for explanation. Religious wars were a real disaster for European history.
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