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Old October 9th, 2013, 01:31 AM   #1

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It seems that the general public know nothing about German history, except for their involvement in World War 1 and beyond. Why do you think this is the case?
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Old October 9th, 2013, 01:50 AM   #2

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Alas, the general public knows nothing about any history.
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Old October 9th, 2013, 02:04 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by The Tudor Rose View Post
It seems that the general public know nothing about German history, except for their involvement in World War 1 and beyond. Why do you think this is the case?
I think it is because German history is quite complicated, especially before Bismarks Unification.

Having said that I would imagine the general public of Germany to know the most concerning their own history.
When I was in Sydney I actually heard a young Australian ask a Dutch girl:
"Excuse me, do Dutch people come from Holland?"
Many of the Australians I met seemed quite anti-education.
The term 'interesting' was used as a sarcastic insult and conversations had to remain at the level of sport or inconsequential chit chat.
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Old October 9th, 2013, 02:32 AM   #4
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It seems that the general public know nothing about German history, except for their involvement in World War 1 and beyond. Why do you think this is the case?
General public know almost nothing what was before World War 1, so maybe that's the reason ^^ Another thing is that before second half of XIX century there was not a single German country but many smaller ones. And they didn't had almost any colonies like France, Britain or Spain mostly they influence Europe when on the other hand french or british propagate their culture around the world
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Old October 9th, 2013, 03:36 AM   #5

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Because of WWII. It's like no one knows anything about Russia prior to the revolution and France before their revolution and Napoleon. For the general public these events/people define the place they come from, thus they would only *have to* know about these events, and when I say know, I mean know of.
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Old October 9th, 2013, 03:57 AM   #6

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Alas, the general public knows nothing about any history.
That's the best answer. I agree.
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Old October 9th, 2013, 06:54 AM   #7

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I would hazard a guess and say that most people know more about German history than British (many would have read of the 1920s and 1930s Germany if only to learn about the rise of Hitler but would, say, many British people know about Britain in the 1930s?).
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Old October 9th, 2013, 06:57 AM   #8

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I would hazard a guess and say that most people know more about German history than British (many would have read of the 1920s and 1930s Germany if only to learn about the rise of Hitler but would, say, many British people know about Britain in the 1930s?).
Good point.
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Old October 9th, 2013, 07:41 AM   #9

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Good point.
My impression from visits to libraries and bookshops is that German history, of whatever period, is popular in the UK.
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Old October 9th, 2013, 08:32 AM   #10
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One might say it's because German involvement in world wars I and II tends to dwarf anything else about German history. The fact is that the public knows very little about history in general, not just the history of Germany. When I tell people I'm writing about the Punic wars I get a blank look. When I mention Hannibal they say "Oh, I've heard of Hannibal! Didn't he cross the Alps with elephants?" And that's all they know about it. Maybe one in twenty could tell you which century.
The state of education in history in our country is deplorable and that, perhaps is something that we history buffs might want to address.
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