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Old September 20th, 2014, 03:35 PM   #1
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What do you read from this Latin text?


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Old September 20th, 2014, 04:29 PM   #2

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I see the number 7... Filieoq is what I'm getting from it. Maybe it's a mangled version of filioque (and Son)?
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Old September 20th, 2014, 04:37 PM   #3
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This number 7 should be 'et'. But I'm real qurious to hear from medieval latinists.
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Old September 20th, 2014, 05:08 PM   #4

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JacekN View Post
This number 7 should be 'et'. But I'm real qurious to hear from medieval latinists.
Filioque means, in whole, and Son. There would be do et in such a case.
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Old September 20th, 2014, 06:00 PM   #5
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Strange that you see 'Filioque' in this text. Please explain.
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Old September 20th, 2014, 06:07 PM   #6

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Quote:
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Filioque means, in whole, and Son. There would be do et in such a case.
That's really wierd that you see filioque. I see 7 filii eoy, which would mean 7 sons and whatever eoy means in Medieval Latin.
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Old September 20th, 2014, 07:25 PM   #7

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I saw Fili, then Eoy, which I assumed to be a bastardisation of Filioque. It's most likely 7 filii, like Imperator said.
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Old September 20th, 2014, 07:33 PM   #8

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I saw Fili, then Eoy, which I assumed to be a bastardisation of Filioque. It's most likely 7 filii, like Imperator said.
Interesting thought. However, assuming that the mark in the front is indeed a 7, it would have to be nominative plural filii because filio is the singular ablative or dative.
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Old September 21st, 2014, 01:27 PM   #9
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Again, that '7' is 'et'. That's clear from the rest of the text. I have included a small portion of it, as I don't want the rest to dictate the meaning you get from context. I am very much interested in understanding the word that follows 'filii'. It does appear to be a pronoun but I would like to stay quiet and hear from someone who knows Latin well enough to recognize this. If this is a shortcut or bastardisation of some kind, please explain.
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Old September 21st, 2014, 07:05 PM   #10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JacekN View Post
Again, that '7' is 'et'. That's clear from the rest of the text. I have included a small portion of it, as I don't want the rest to dictate the meaning you get from context. I am very much interested in understanding the word that follows 'filii'. It does appear to be a pronoun but I would like to stay quiet and hear from someone who knows Latin well enough to recognize this. If this is a shortcut or bastardisation of some kind, please explain.
I would agree that the eoy is probably a bastardization of a pronoun, but that's all I can say.
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