Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > European History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

European History European History Forum - Western and Eastern Europe including the British Isles, Scandinavia, Russia


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old March 1st, 2015, 07:06 AM   #11

Lucius's Avatar
the governed self
 
Joined: Jan 2007
From: Nebraska
Posts: 15,966

Oh. You're talking about the Baltic people. Sorry, I was talking about the Baltic states.
Lucius is offline  
Remove Ads
Old March 1st, 2015, 07:29 AM   #12

Lucius's Avatar
the governed self
 
Joined: Jan 2007
From: Nebraska
Posts: 15,966

Of course we are all related to each other but here are the 3 Baltic States.

https://www.google.com/search?site=&...tates&imgdii=_
Lucius is offline  
Old March 1st, 2015, 09:22 AM   #13
Suspended until May 15th, 2018
 
Joined: Dec 2009
Posts: 5,457

Quote:
Originally Posted by greatstreetwarrior View Post
Are Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia more Germanic or are they more Nordic?
I would say neither. They don't speak Germanic base languages, and in one Baltic country, not even an Indo-European language.

Being neighbors of Germany and Scandinavia, they were influenced by both, but also by their Slavic neighbors like Poland too.
Bart Dale is offline  
Old March 1st, 2015, 10:05 AM   #14

Rodger's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Jun 2014
From: US
Posts: 3,482

Like others,I agree the Baltic states can't be easily defined. Despite the Teutonic Knights efforts, the Balts themselves weren't completely eliminated. People such as the Vikings, Polish (especially on Lithuania), Russians and Germans have all left their genetic and cultural marks.
Rodger is offline  
Old March 1st, 2015, 10:49 AM   #15
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2014
From: Lithuania
Posts: 1,367

Bunching 3 Baltic state doesn't mean makes a lot of sense. Lithuanians and Latvians are actually very close, languages are not easily mutually understandable, but they are quite close and people who live near border usually understand both. Estonians are totally different people and they are much closer to Fins.

Germans and Scandinavians are not related to Balts, linguistically Slavs are closest to Balts. Discussion about genetics are forbidden, but basically Lithuanians and Latvians are very close and for some reason Estonians genetically are also quite closely related. (I don't know why, Lithuanians and Estonians historically did not have a lot of contact.)
janusdviveidis is offline  
Old March 1st, 2015, 11:11 AM   #16

Grimald's Avatar
Civilized Barbarian
 
Joined: Nov 2011
From: Hercynian Forest
Posts: 5,860

Seen superficially from the outside, the Baltic states appear to be very similar to each other. Probably, this similarity is even true for the present; after all, all three states were part of the Soviet Union and after the revolution of 1989/91, all three developed similar political ideas and tried to orient themselves towards the West. All three states are now members of NATO, the EU, and the Eurozone. Also, their problems, with some variations, are similar, with one of them being the dependency on Russia for energy.

However, linguistically and historically, the three states are very heterogeneous. Linguistically, Estonia is the odd one out, with its language being closely related to Finnish, and not at all to the Baltic languages Latvian and Lithuanian. Historically, Lithuania is the odd one out, with its close relations to Poland and its time as a great power that governed a much greater territory than today. On the other hand, Estonia and Latvia were united for centuries as Livonia under the Teutonic Order, and experienced a strong German influence.

A common feature of all three countries is that their culture was primarily rural in nature, whereas their towns were dominated by other nations, be it Germans, Poles, or Russians.
Grimald is offline  
Old March 1st, 2015, 12:00 PM   #17

AlpinLuke's Avatar
Knight-errant
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Lago Maggiore, Italy
Posts: 20,454
Blog Entries: 19

Quote:
Originally Posted by authun View Post
Swedish, norwegian and danish are north germanic languages whereas german is a west germanic language. Lithuanian and latvian however are very different and are baltic languages, a very old and conservative branch of indo european. Estonian is a uralic language and not even indo european.

It's probably a fair question to ask why, other than the fact that they are on the baltic coast, do we group these three countries as 'baltic' but don't include countries like Poland or Finland.
I do repeat that when I was in Norwegian I got the impression to hear a Germanic language ...

A part the personal impressions of a Italian with German roots, you can rely on some common sources like this: [ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germanic_languages]Germanic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
AlpinLuke is online now  
Old March 1st, 2015, 12:03 PM   #18

PRM's Avatar
PRM
Lecturer
 
Joined: Mar 2014
From: Goettingen
Posts: 440

Quote:
Originally Posted by greatstreetwarrior View Post
Are Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia more Germanic or are they more Nordic?
None of both, they are Baltic. With the exception of Estonia, which is Finnic. What is Nordic? Scandinavian - Germanic, or something of your definition?
PRM is offline  
Old March 1st, 2015, 12:05 PM   #19

PRM's Avatar
PRM
Lecturer
 
Joined: Mar 2014
From: Goettingen
Posts: 440

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlpinLuke View Post
I do repeat that when I was in Norwegian I got the impression to hear a Germanic language ...

A part the personal impressions of a Italian with German roots, you can rely on some common sources like this: Germanic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
CERTAINLY you heard a Germanic language, what else? And one that is quite understandable once you speak several Germanic languages.

Baltic languages are a family for themselves, under extinction, Prussian was also a Baltic language, before Germanization. Now there are clubs trying to revive Prussian language, but they are scurile like so many back to the roots movements of reviving lost identities, unfortunately!
PRM is offline  
Old March 1st, 2015, 12:20 PM   #20

PRM's Avatar
PRM
Lecturer
 
Joined: Mar 2014
From: Goettingen
Posts: 440

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimald View Post
A common feature of all three countries is that their culture was primarily rural in nature, whereas their towns were dominated by other nations, be it Germans, Poles, or Russians.
I would not say this to a Lithuanian, since they indeed brought quite a powerful contribution to the Rzeczpospolica ....
PRM is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > European History

Tags
baltic, germanic, nordic, states



Search tags for this page
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Germanic or Nordic rite of Manhood or "Vision Quest" THusar Ancient History 7 March 3rd, 2015 06:42 PM
Russia Attempts to Destabilize the Baltic States in the Early 2000s? Futurist Speculative History 6 November 24th, 2014 03:05 PM
Trying to find ancient Nordic & Germanic names Shadowclaw European History 23 November 17th, 2013 02:26 PM
Germanic States (1700-1800s) conningcris European History 5 January 31st, 2011 05:12 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.