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Old February 28th, 2015, 11:57 PM   #1
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Are the Baltic states more Germanic or Nordic


Are Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia more Germanic or are they more Nordic?
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Old March 1st, 2015, 12:14 AM   #2

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I know that Estonian is classified as a Finno-Uralic language. Lithuanian and Latvian are Indo-European languages that are separate from latin, germanic, and slavic languages. The Baltic states had their own unique history, but they were gates for German immigrants and once were under Swedish control.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 12:27 AM   #3
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Are Estonia, Lithuania and Latvia more Germanic or are they more Nordic?
Please explain the words "Germanic" and "Nordic" and the difference.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 12:27 AM   #4
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They are more Baltic.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 12:30 AM   #5

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Premises: let's not make confusion between German and Germanic, this has to be kept clearly in mind.

In Scandinavia there are still Northern Germanic population, mixed with other Germanic population coming from South.

The Northern Germanic tribes which didn't leave Scandinavia in early Middle Ages have generated, for example, the Viking world [the language spoken by the Vikings was Germanic].

If you go to Norway [I have been there] you will note that Norwegian presents visible similarities with German [I've got German roots and in Norway I spoke German with Norwegians as well .... and in the rural areas they tend to prefer German to English, at least this was my direct experience], overall when you take a look at a written text.


This said, as for I know in the Baltic countries they don't speak Germanic languages and the population is more Baltic with interesting Finnish influences [Finnish people is not Germanic], in fact Estonia presents a main Finnish identity as for language.

So, I wouldn't make a difference from Germanic and Northern [I repeat, if you don't intend "German"] since the majority of the Scandinavian population is Germanic as well, but in any case the Baltic populations are not German they are North-Eastern, if we want ... Finnish Uralic as said.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 02:42 AM   #6
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Swedish, norwegian and danish are north germanic languages whereas german is a west germanic language. Lithuanian and latvian however are very different and are baltic languages, a very old and conservative branch of indo european. Estonian is a uralic language and not even indo european.

It's probably a fair question to ask why, other than the fact that they are on the baltic coast, do we group these three countries as 'baltic' but don't include countries like Poland or Finland.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 06:18 AM   #7

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It's probably a fair question to ask why, other than the fact that they are on the baltic coast, do we group these three countries as 'baltic' but don't include countries like Poland or Finland.
It's because "Baltic states" is a lot faster to pronounce than "Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia". It's 3 syllables compared to twelve. People are very busy nowadays.

Also, they're all in a line and about the same size.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 06:27 AM   #8

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Neither. Linguistically they're Balto-Slavic and Finno-Ugric with a history that included a German elite imposed in the Northern Crusades and being screwed worse than anyone between Poland, Germany, and Russia.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 06:41 AM   #9
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It's because "Baltic states" is a lot faster to pronounce than "Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia". It's 3 syllables compared to twelve. People are very busy nowadays.
Same would apply if you included all countries that bordered the baltic. It may be something to do with the conversion of the [mixed linguistic] area's conversion to Christianity.

The Balts, ie the people, are from Lithuania and Latvia. Estonians are not Balts. They are Aesti, a uralic speaking peoples. I guess that the inclusion of Oeselians with the Livs and Latgalians, names from the 13th/14th cents. is somehow connected to the Livonian crusades, but I am not familiar with the history.
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Old March 1st, 2015, 06:51 AM   #10

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They are neither Germanic, German, Scandinavian or anyhing. They are special. We've been tought in school that if you take a look at a town of theirs, it should remind you of Scandinavian towns. Germanic influence is quite present, considering the religion there.

I never understood why they're put in a group together. They don't speak the same languages, afaik even Latvians and Lithuanians don't understand each other. They don't have the same religion or origin. The only common things seem to be their size, location, partially history and share of Slavic minorities.

Estonians seem to be the closest to Finns, while Lithuanians and Latvians, proper Balts, are the closest to Slavs. Some of their folk costumes with embroidered shirts are pretty similar to neighbouring Slavic costumes, the embroidery patterns are also quite similar. Lithuanians have a historic bond with Belarusians and the Polish.
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