Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > European History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

European History European History Forum - Western and Eastern Europe including the British Isles, Scandinavia, Russia


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 12th, 2015, 05:42 AM   #41
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Apr 2011
From: Sarmatia
Posts: 6,626

Just like Scandinavian sagas which were written centuries after the events which they were describing, there were also some Polish legends from pagan times written in the chronicles centuries later. For example the story of the great warior and slavic duke Wyszomir or Wyzimir the Daneslayer (in latin Wyssimirus) which is known from 13th century Polish chronicle.

We dont know if he really existed, only the legend about him survived and the city which was named after him (today Wismar in Germany, Mecklenburg). He is moreless as historic as Ragnar Lodbrok.


According to the legend which comes from pagan times and was written down by Wincenty Kadlubek in 1202 AD in his "Historia Polonica" and also by unknown monks in the chronicle of Greater Poland from year 1283-1286 AD Wyzimir was the son of Polish or rather Polanian duke who had 20 sons. Because he was one of the youngest sons he had no hope to become the ruler. But he has gathered the company of wariors and together with them conquered many western slavic tribes, finally he has founded the city and named it after himself "Wyszomierz" - which is today German Wismar in Mecklenburg but that time it was a purelly slavic settlement.

Next Wizymir attacked Danes and took from them islands of Rugen and Funen. He forced Danish king to give him as hostages his children and to pay tribute. The daughters of danish king became concubines of Wizymir.

But after short time the king of Danes stopped to pay the tribute and Wizymir invaded Denmark slaughtering great masses of Danes and making the rest of them his slaves.

Thats the legend from two different chronicles from 13th century.
Mosquito is offline  
Remove Ads
Old June 13th, 2015, 02:15 AM   #42

Haesten's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Dec 2011
Posts: 2,509

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mosquito View Post
According to Saga's after escaping from Poland she married Olaf Trygvasson who became the king of Norway.

"The Danish king, Svein Tjuguskeg, was married to Gunhild, a daughter of Burizleif, king of the Vinds..(..)...Burizleif, the king of the Vinds, complained to his relation Earl Sigvalde, that the agreement was broken which Sigvalde had made between King Svein and King Burizleif, by which Burizleif was to get in marriage Thyre, Harald's daughter, a sister of King Svein: but that marriage had not proceeded, for Thyre had given positive no to the proposal to marry her to an old and heathen king. "Now," said King Burizleif to Earl Sigvalde, "I must have the promise fulfilled." And he told Earl Sigvalde to go to Denmark, and bring him Thyre as his queen. Earl Sigvalde loses no time, but goes to King Svein of Denmark, explains to him the case; and brings it so far by his persuasion, that the king delivered his sister Thyre into his hands. With her went some female attendants, and her foster-father, by name Ozur Agason, a man of great power, and some other people. In the agreement between the king and the earl, it was settled that Thyre should have in property the possessions which Queen Gunhild had enjoyed in Vindland, besides other great properties as bride-gifts. Thyre wept sorely, and went very unwillingly. When the earl came to Vindland, Burizleif held his wedding with Queen Thyre, and received her in marriage; bus as long as she was among heathens she would neither eat nor drink with them, and this lasted for seven days...(...)...It happened one night that Queen Thyre and Ozur ran away in the dark, and into the woods, and, to be short in our story, came at last to Denmark. But here Thyre did not dare to remain, knowing that if her brother King Svein heard of her, he would send her back directly to Vindland. She went on, therefore, secretly to Norway, and never stayed her journey until she fell in with King Olaf, by whom she was kindly received."


However in the iceladinc saga's Snori has mixed two Polish rulers into one Burizleif because Burizleif was Bolesław the Brave king of Poland and his pagan father Mieszko I of Poland. The Earl Sigvalde from Saga's was the jarl of Jomsborg. But Snori was writing his sagas in the far Iceland few centuries after the events he was describing and which he knew only from spoken legends. Poland in saga's is named with its nordic name "Vindland". On the begining of XI century both Danes and Swedes were looking for the support of Poles because Poland became the strongest kingdom in the Baltic area. Bolesław the Brave fought victorious wars against German Empire, conquered Bohemians and even far Kiev which he plundered and raped the sister of Yaroslav the Wise, the duke of Kiev Rus. Bolesław the Brave gave also the son of his sister Cnut the unit of Polish wariors for the conquest of England.
Sweyn Forkbeard and his father Harald Bluetooth did not get on.
The Encomium Emmae Reginae (Cnut's wife) says Harald was wounded in battle against his son Sweyn and fled to the Slavs.

It was probably then that Harald married his daughter Tyra to a Polish prince, he had originaly married her to a Jomsborg Viking, Styrbjörn the Strong, son of the Swedish king Olof, and the nephew of Olof's co-ruler and successor Eric the Victorious, who defeated and killed Styrbjörn at the Battle of Fyrisvellir, Harald deserting his son-in-law.

Tyra appears to have been widowed again before she marries Olaf Tryggvason, Olaf and Sweyn had campaigned in England together in 994, Æthelred buying them of with 16,000 pounds of Danegeld, but by 999 Sweyn had allied with Eric Haakonsson, earl of Lade and Olof Skötkonung, son of Eric the Victorious (married his mother) against Olaf Tryggvason

Olaf and Tyra appear to have been heading for her Polish possessions when ambushed at the Battle of Svolder by Sweyn, Eric and Olof, famous for the Ormen Lange (Long Serpent).

http://tinyurl.com/qbzz5gw

Last edited by Haesten; June 13th, 2015 at 02:18 AM.
Haesten is online now  
Old May 3rd, 2016, 01:45 AM   #43
Archivist
 
Joined: May 2014
From: Somewhere nice
Posts: 170

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mosquito View Post
Just like Scandinavian sagas which were written centuries after the events which they were describing, there were also some Polish legends from pagan times written in the chronicles centuries later. For example the story of the great warior and slavic duke Wyszomir or Wyzimir the Daneslayer (in latin Wyssimirus) which is known from 13th century Polish chronicle.

We dont know if he really existed, only the legend about him survived and the city which was named after him (today Wismar in Germany, Mecklenburg). He is moreless as historic as Ragnar Lodbrok.


According to the legend which comes from pagan times and was written down by Wincenty Kadlubek in 1202 AD in his "Historia Polonica" and also by unknown monks in the chronicle of Greater Poland from year 1283-1286 AD Wyzimir was the son of Polish or rather Polanian duke who had 20 sons. Because he was one of the youngest sons he had no hope to become the ruler. But he has gathered the company of wariors and together with them conquered many western slavic tribes, finally he has founded the city and named it after himself "Wyszomierz" - which is today German Wismar in Mecklenburg but that time it was a purelly slavic settlement.

Next Wizymir attacked Danes and took from them islands of Rugen and Funen. He forced Danish king to give him as hostages his children and to pay tribute. The daughters of danish king became concubines of Wizymir.

But after short time the king of Danes stopped to pay the tribute and Wizymir invaded Denmark slaughtering great masses of Danes and making the rest of them his slaves.

Thats the legend from two different chronicles from 13th century.
Notwithstanding Denmark’s homogeneity, we observed a clear signal of Polish admixture in the East of the country, coinciding with historical Polish settlements in the region before the Middle Ages.

OASIS
Waldemar Tomaszewski is offline  
Old May 3rd, 2016, 02:55 AM   #44
Historian
 
Joined: Jan 2010
From: -
Posts: 17,473

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waldemar Tomaszewski View Post
Notwithstanding Denmark’s homogeneity, we observed a clear signal of Polish admixture in the East of the country, coinciding with historical Polish settlements in the region before the Middle Ages.

OASIS
Polish or Slavic?
beorna is offline  
Old May 3rd, 2016, 06:34 AM   #45
Archivist
 
Joined: May 2014
From: Somewhere nice
Posts: 170

Quote:
Originally Posted by beorna View Post
Polish or Slavic?
I'd say West Slavic, therefore Polish alike.
Waldemar Tomaszewski is offline  
Old May 3rd, 2016, 08:02 AM   #46

Shtajerc's Avatar
last real Windischer
 
Joined: Jul 2014
From: Lower Styria, Slovenia
Posts: 5,805

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waldemar Tomaszewski View Post
I'd say West Slavic, therefore Polish alike.
West Slavic in the sense of that time is most probably more correct, as it is broader and includes Polabians and others, who wouldn't necessarily all morph into Poles, like we saw later with Sorbs, Kashubians (and Slovincians).
Shtajerc is online now  
Old May 6th, 2016, 12:49 AM   #47
Archivist
 
Joined: May 2014
From: Somewhere nice
Posts: 170

Świętosława was a Polish princess, daughter of Mieszko I of Poland and Dobrawa of Bohemia, and sister of Boleslaw I of Poland. She was married first to Eric the Victorious of Swedenand then Sweyn Forkbeard of Denmark, according to German chroniclers, and gave them the sons Olof, and Canute and Harald, respectively. The name is only known through an inscription that gives the name of Canute's sister and the assumption that this sister was named for her mother.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%9A...99tos%C5%82awa

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigrid_the_Haughty

As part of an international team of researchers, archaeologists at Aarhus University can reveal that a large part of Harold Bluetooth’s Viking army consisted of foreigners – possibly from Poland.

Single
Waldemar Tomaszewski is offline  
Old May 6th, 2016, 01:04 AM   #48
Historian
 
Joined: Aug 2011
Posts: 4,460

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waldemar Tomaszewski View Post
Świętosława was a Polish princess, daughter of Mieszko I of Poland and Dobrawa of Bohemia, and sister of Boleslaw I of Poland. She was married first to Eric the Victorious of Swedenand then Sweyn Forkbeard of Denmark, according to German chroniclers, and gave them the sons Olof, and Canute and Harald, respectively. The name is only known through an inscription that gives the name of Canute's sister and the assumption that this sister was named for her mother.
A friend of mine, a swedish historian, Ingemar Nordgren has a part share in the Sigrid Storrada, Sigrid the Haughty, viking longship replica. It's usually on Lake Vänern.

Click the image to open in full size.
authun is offline  
Old May 9th, 2016, 04:36 AM   #49
Archivist
 
Joined: May 2014
From: Somewhere nice
Posts: 170

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gumis View Post
Polish borders in 1000 AD, compared to main centers of the Polish army per Gallus Anonymus:

Poland controlled all of Pomerania between the Oder and the Vistula River since around 970 AD:

Click the image to open in full size.

Map taken from the book "Archaeology of Early Medieval Poland" by Andrzej Buko (link):

http://brego-weard.com/lib/ns/The_Ar...and_Discov.pdf
I have included diocesan capitals founded by Bolesław I of Poland in 1000 AD.
Click the image to open in full size.

"Chronicon Thietmari" (written between 1012 and 1018):
Quote:
Bolizlavus [Bolesław I of Poland] (...) Nec mora, fecit ibi archiepiscopatum [Gnesin; Gniezno], ut spero legitime, sine consensu tamen prefati presulis, cuius diocesi omnis haec regio subiecta est; committens eundem predicti martyris fratri Radimo eidemque subiciens Reinbernum, Salsae Cholbergiensis [Kołobrzeg] aecclesiae episcopum, Popponem Cracuaensem [Kraków], Iohannem Wrotizlaensem [Wrocław], Vungero Posnaniensi [Poznań] excepto; factoque ibi altari sanctas in eo honorifice condidit reliquias.
On 25 July 1002 at a Hoftag (imperial meeting) held in Merseburg, Henry II gave the Lusatian march and the eastern part of the Meissen march (Milzenerland, Upper Lusatia) to Bolesław I as a fief. Boleslaw I entered Prague in March 1003 where the Bohemian lords proclaimed him duke.

The early (pre-990s) boundaries of the state...
"with all its lands in borders which run along the long sea [Baltic Sea], along Prussia [located in the east of the Vistula] to the place called Rus [981 AD: "Vladimir marched upon the Lyakhs (Poles) and took their cities: Peremyshl, Cherven, and other towns"], thence to Kraków and from said Kraków to the River Oder, straight to a place called Alemure [Olomouc?], and from said Alemure to the land of Milczanie [Upper Lusatia?], and from the borders of that people to the Oder and from that, going along the River Oder, ending at the earlier mentioned city of Schinesghe [Szczecin?]."
Waldemar Tomaszewski is offline  
Old May 10th, 2016, 08:20 PM   #50

Ivar's Avatar
Lecturer
 
Joined: Jan 2016
From: Boland
Posts: 320

Off topic a bit but thought I'd share some information about another historical "Slavic viking", Racibor (Ratibor)!
Raided the very important trading city of Kungahalla (Located in today's Sweden). Apparently after this successful raid the city never returned to the level of prestige it enjoyed at that time. There is a very good book on this in Polish by Artur Szrejter, "Wielka Wyprawa Ksiecia Racibora", I highly recommend it. Racibor was a Slavic prince of the house Griffin, he was as the book describes under the rule of King Boleslav III Krzywousty (Wrymouthed).
Ivar is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > European History

Tags
land, raiders, raiding, sea, vandals, vikings, wends or vinds



Search tags for this page
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Could commerce raiding have strangled the UK? PureNRG007 Speculative History 4 May 2nd, 2014 06:09 AM
Was the Ndebele's economy sorely dependend on raiding the shona? Phantomknight3 Middle Eastern and African History 3 February 26th, 2013 03:25 AM
The Second Crusade against the Wends cannelidis1 Medieval and Byzantine History 8 December 15th, 2009 06:38 PM
Q-ships vs Raiders Richard Stanbery War and Military History 1 April 3rd, 2009 06:27 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.