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View Poll Results: Disraeli vs Gladstone
Benjamin Disraeli 12 41.38%
William Ewart Gladstone 17 58.62%
Voters: 29. You may not vote on this poll

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Old January 10th, 2017, 03:10 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Ancientgeezer View Post
Gladstone spend a large amount of his time stalking the streets of London seeking to reclaim street prostitutes from a life of vice. He would invite them to he home and give them food and shelter for the night, lecturing them on the evils of sin.
Sometimes his wife joined in.
I know I am late in responding but this line is one of the most amusing I have read on Historum. Well done, Geezer.
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Old January 10th, 2017, 11:59 AM   #32
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I know I am late in responding but this line is one of the most amusing I have read on Historum. Well done, Geezer.
But do you think that Joseph Chamberlain could have been a better PM than Gladstone? He was clearly a radical, and was much more active than Gladstone in reforms and public works.
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Old January 10th, 2017, 05:01 PM   #33

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Disraeli was a classic imperialist and realpolitik player. I find his vision to be more beneficial to Britain and her position in the world than Gladstone's. He also instituted the first features of what would evolve into the welfare state.Plus, he outmaneuvred Ottoman von Bismarck of all people, in the Congress of Berlin in 1878. Thus, it gives me great pleasure to cast the tiebreaking vote (for now) in his favor.
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Old January 10th, 2017, 06:49 PM   #34
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Disraeli was a classic imperialist and realpolitik player. I find his vision to be more beneficial to Britain and her position in the world than Gladstone's. He also instituted the first features of what would evolve into the welfare state.Plus, he outmaneuvred Ottoman von Bismarck of all people, in the Congress of Berlin in 1878. Thus, it gives me great pleasure to cast the tiebreaking vote (for now) in his favor.
I agree, with him leading the party, the Tories began to become less reactionary and care about reforms (well, but after him, they could only deliver few-to-no reforms). Meanwhile, Gladstone tended to give more reforms when he became more radical with age, and his successors, who became Progressive Liberals, gave even more reforms.

Well, but Tories had lots of great Foreign Minister, like Disraelis himself and Salisbury.
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Old January 10th, 2017, 07:43 PM   #35
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Well, but Tories had lots of great Foreign Minister, like Disraelis himself and Salisbury.
Was Disraeli Foreign Minister?
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Old January 10th, 2017, 07:54 PM   #36
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Was Disraeli Foreign Minister?
I was wrong, but I mean they had many politicians with strong ability in dealing with foreign affairs
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Old January 12th, 2017, 08:41 PM   #37

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Although I might have enjoyed socializing with Disraeli more than the rather prudish Gladstone, Disraeli's stance against revoking the Corn Laws was unforgivable. (Gladstone later essentially agreed with revoking the Corn Laws.)

Background:

"Corn" refers to any grain, especially wheat.

The Corn Laws were essentially protectionist tariffs that kept imported grain prices high in order to protect British domestic farmers.

With several crop failures and frequent episodes of famine, it became important to allow cheap imported grains. The Irish famine of the 1840s brought the crisis to a tragic climax.

Disraeli, wanting to protect the landowner elites, rejected the idea of cheaper imports that could have helped the starving masses.

Fortunately, Britain revoked the Corn Laws by 1846, helping to avert a widespread rebellion. The Corn Laws were partially responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Brits (especially the Irish) from starvation or the diseases brought on by a weakened state of health.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_Laws



To state that Disraeli and Gladstone didn't get along is an understatement.

Gladstone was called "The Grand Old Man" or "G.O.M." by his supporters. Disraeli said that "G.O.M." stood for "God's only mistake."

Last edited by Bart9349; January 12th, 2017 at 08:57 PM.
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Old January 12th, 2017, 11:40 PM   #38

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Disraeli is a real OG
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Old January 13th, 2017, 02:14 AM   #39

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bart9349 View Post
Although I might have enjoyed socializing with Disraeli more than the rather prudish Gladstone, Disraeli's stance against revoking the Corn Laws was unforgivable. (Gladstone later essentially agreed with revoking the Corn Laws.)

Background:

"Corn" refers to any grain, especially wheat.

The Corn Laws were essentially protectionist tariffs that kept imported grain prices high in order to protect British domestic farmers.

With several crop failures and frequent episodes of famine, it became important to allow cheap imported grains. The Irish famine of the 1840s brought the crisis to a tragic climax.

Disraeli, wanting to protect the landowner elites, rejected the idea of cheaper imports that could have helped the starving masses.

Fortunately, Britain revoked the Corn Laws by 1846, helping to avert a widespread rebellion. The Corn Laws were partially responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Brits (especially the Irish) from starvation or the diseases brought on by a weakened state of health.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_Laws



To state that Disraeli and Gladstone didn't get along is an understatement.

Gladstone was called "The Grand Old Man" or "G.O.M." by his supporters. Disraeli said that "G.O.M." stood for "God's only mistake."
That was Disraeli's one mistake- but I find fault with part of Gladstone's vision.
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Old January 13th, 2017, 11:09 AM   #40
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But we cannot denied that Disraelis had transformed the Tories from a bunch of hardcore reactionary kleptocrats to those who seemed to begin to care about normal people.
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