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Old February 16th, 2017, 05:14 PM   #51

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Mestizo specifically means someone of mixed ancestry, thus neither native nor European but a mix of both. The Spanish were very strict about labeling people in the new world regarding their ancestry. One of the reasons we can dispel this myth that they were somehow inherently less racist or prejudiced than settlers in north america is the fact that there was a racial hierarchy in place in Latin america all during the colonial period. Whites from Spain at the top, local whites next, mestizos (mixed) and mulattoes in the middle, black African slaves and then natives was usually how it went and then there are several more specific mixed categories that are practically forgotten today that concern different mixtures of races.
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Old February 16th, 2017, 08:16 PM   #52
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Mestizo specifically means someone of mixed ancestry, thus neither native nor European but a mix of both. The Spanish were very strict about labeling people in the new world regarding their ancestry. One of the reasons we can dispel this myth that they were somehow inherently less racist or prejudiced than settlers in north america is the fact that there was a racial hierarchy in place in Latin america all during the colonial period. Whites from Spain at the top, local whites next, mestizos (mixed) and mulattoes in the middle, black African slaves and then natives was usually how it went and then there are several more specific mixed categories that are practically forgotten today that concern different mixtures of races.
I heard somebody talk about Alaska having mestizos-meaning part european and part native. Is that wrong?
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Old February 16th, 2017, 08:27 PM   #53

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Is mestizo the proper term for a native from a non spanish country like Canada or America?
In canada the term was Metis for mixed native and French ancestry
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Old February 16th, 2017, 10:42 PM   #54
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I heard somebody talk about Alaska having mestizos-meaning part european and part native. Is that wrong?
Yes, mestizos is not an American English word and is almost both unknown and unused. The Politically correct is "Native American", though real Indians don't care if one calls them Indians. Politically correct terms are part of social engineering and mind control.
The term 'Native American' or Amerindian is applied equally to full blooded and half-breeds both by Americans in general and by Indians.

Disclaimer: I've known Indians all my life. Have had them as friends and friends of the family that were closer then aunts and uncles in terms of how well we knew them. Have eaten meals with them have done sleep overs at their houses and have been smudged by them [a ritual somewhat like grace before meals meant to drive out evil spirits in which one has smoke blown on one]. Usually I and members of my family just called them by their names, but when using the term Indian they never objected no did any Indian I did not know personally.

Mestizos is ever only used by Americans when talking about Latin American Indians. I'm not comfortable applying the term 'Amerindians' to Latin American indians and I'm not alone in that.
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Old February 17th, 2017, 05:47 AM   #55

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I heard somebody talk about Alaska having mestizos-meaning part european and part native. Is that wrong?
Not sure really, the term only makes sense in Spanish because it is a Spanish term. Mixed heritage would be a better term in English I suppose, as pointed out by our Canadian friend the term Metis is the French-Canadian equivalent and that gives an idea of the term. I think in the United States anyone with some native heritage is considered native (one drop rule and all that) so there was never a need for an English equivalent of mestizo. But the intent in that usage in Alaska is correct a mestizo is someone with European and native heritage, so it would be correct in that sense.
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Old February 17th, 2017, 06:19 AM   #56

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Yes, mestizos is not an American English word and is almost both unknown and unused.
Is this term somewhat insulting?
If you used the term in public would people be offended?
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Old February 17th, 2017, 03:21 PM   #57
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Yes, mestizos is not an American English word and is almost both unknown and unused. The Politically correct is "Native American", though real Indians don't care if one calls them Indians. Politically correct terms are part of social engineering and mind control.
The term 'Native American' or Amerindian is applied equally to full blooded and half-breeds both by Americans in general and by Indians.

Disclaimer: I've known Indians all my life. Have had them as friends and friends of the family that were closer then aunts and uncles in terms of how well we knew them. Have eaten meals with them have done sleep overs at their houses and have been smudged by them [a ritual somewhat like grace before meals meant to drive out evil spirits in which one has smoke blown on one]. Usually I and members of my family just called them by their names, but when using the term Indian they never objected no did any Indian I did not know personally.

Mestizos is ever only used by Americans when talking about Latin American Indians. I'm not comfortable applying the term 'Amerindians' to Latin American indians and I'm not alone in that.

Does Native American make sense for alaska natives and inuits?
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Old February 17th, 2017, 03:29 PM   #58
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No doubt, there was discrimination on the part of ALL European rulers, but if we look at a few aspects of the resulting populations, we see that Natives from the north ended up on reservations or dead, while Natives in countries previously ruled by Spain ended up in society.

You're right about mestizos being considered second class citizens, while Indigenous people were even lower down, but many Spanish fathers acknowledged them, and, while I agree that they did not treat their mothers well, some treated the children like their own. In the US, few mixed race children were ever acknowledged and they were usually slaves just like their mothers.
You are stating facts my friend. The Spaniards saw their children out of their native wife as their own. It was their family. They were not treated the way the Dutch or British did it to their issues.

Sure, there was Spanish bigot treatment against the natives, but, unlike the Dutch and the British, they never put up walls of segregation. Anti racists laws were not initiated by the Spaniards because they were not into it the way such was practiced in the territories of the British and Dutch empires.
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Old February 17th, 2017, 03:39 PM   #59
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Not sure really, the term only makes sense in Spanish because it is a Spanish term. Mixed heritage would be a better term in English I suppose, as pointed out by our Canadian friend the term Metis is the French-Canadian equivalent and that gives an idea of the term. I think in the United States anyone with some native heritage is considered native (one drop rule and all that) so there was never a need for an English equivalent of mestizo. But the intent in that usage in Alaska is correct a mestizo is someone with European and native heritage, so it would be correct in that sense.
why arent the other natives considered inuits?
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Old February 17th, 2017, 03:59 PM   #60

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Were there few to start with or was it British policy to kill them off?
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This my friends is a dark topic....
A very dark topic.....
I don't hide that i'm still sometimes very shocked by what i see in Australia.
I mean by the way the aborigin are treated by the whites.
In 2015, in Perth, i saw Australian policeman expelling a group of aboriginals from downtown while they were doing nothing bad.
Australian policemen had white gloves not to catch deseases.....
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