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-   -   The idol of your country ... (http://historum.com/general-history/124049-idol-your-country.html)

AlpinLuke December 8th, 2016 07:20 AM

The idol of your country ...
 
I was thinking to how Italians consider Giuseppe Garibaldi [the hero of two worlds].

For an Italian it's difficult to think to an other personage of our national history who deserves more honor. So let's say that Garibaldi is the "idol of Italians" [I know a part of Italians don't like him, but ...].

If you have to indicate the "idol" of the history of your own country ... who will be the favored historical personage?

Lm1985 December 8th, 2016 09:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlpinLuke (Post 2660083)
I was thinking to how Italians consider Giuseppe Garibaldi [the hero of two worlds].

For an Italian it's difficult to think to an other personage of our national history who deserves more honor. So let's say that Garibaldi is the "idol of Italians" [I know a part of Italians don't like him, but ...].

If you have to indicate the "idol" of the history of your own country ... who will be the favored historical personage?

My impression is that dislike for Garibaldi has raised a lot in the last years (I think about table-talk, but also persisten anti-Risorgimento storiography); maybe, as an Italian, I can think of other figures who are super partes, but at this moment I don't know.....the problem in out contry is that we're always divided (guelfi-ghibellini; right-left; pro-Risorgimento against revisionist, ecc...ecc....).

AlpinLuke December 8th, 2016 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lm1985 (Post 2660144)
My impression is that dislike for Garibaldi has raised a lot in the last years (I think about table-talk, but also persisten anti-Risorgimento storiography); maybe, as an Italian, I can think of other figures who are super partes, but at this moment I don't know.....the problem in out contry is that we're always divided (guelfi-ghibellini; right-left; pro-Risorgimento against revisionist, ecc...ecc....).

That's the history of Italy: we have had national heroes, but time comes when it's more politically correct to look for super partes figures.

Who?

Even if you mention Alessandro Manzoni you will obtain a negative feedback from High School students who are forced to read his novel about a guy and a gal who wanted to get married, but they got troubles from a rude boss and some odd personages [a priest, a lawyer an "innominato", "nameless" ...]!!!.

Asherman December 8th, 2016 09:41 AM

George Washington stands alone.

Lm1985 December 8th, 2016 09:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlpinLuke (Post 2660150)
That's the history of Italy: we have had national heroes, but time comes when it's more politically correct to look for super partes figures.

Who?

Even if you mention Alessandro Manzoni you will obtain a negative feedback from High School students who are forced to read his novel about a guy and a gal who wanted to get married, but they got troubles from a rude boss and some odd personages [a priest, a lawyer an "innominato", "nameless" ...]!!!.

Ah that's true, but come on...Don Lisander was the author of what we could call the "grande romanzo italiano" (like Americans talk about the great American novel). Let's think about Dante Alighieri then...(literary heroes all the way!!).

David Vagamundo December 8th, 2016 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlpinLuke (Post 2660150)
. . .
Even if you mention Alessandro Manzoni you will obtain a negative feedback from High School students who are forced to read his novel about a guy and a gal who wanted to get married, but they got troubles from a rude boss and some odd personages [a priest, a lawyer an "innominato", "nameless" ...]!!!.

Darn--recently bought I Promessi Sposi and plan to read it early next year!

So no one in Italy thinks of Dante or Cicero or Cato anymore?

Lm1985 December 8th, 2016 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David Vagamundo (Post 2660161)
Darn--recently bought I Promessi Sposi and plan to read it early next year!

So no one in Italy thinks of Dante or Cicero or Cato anymore?

Cicero and Cato sound more Roman than Italian I think (as writer Prezzolini said in a critical way, we are more the result of a bunch of mixed races who invaded the peninsula and not the descendants of glorious Rome); Dante of course is studied for three years in all kind of high schools (Inferno-Purgatorio-Paradiso), and is also read and commented in different lecturae in squares around Italy (Benigni did a lot of lectures some years ago); if I would choose our national hero, I would say Dante.

Quote:

Originally Posted by David Vagamundo (Post 2660161)
Darn--recently bought I Promessi Sposi and plan to read it early next year!

I assure you, it's the kind of novel - and authro - that we Italian HATED as students, and appreciate when/if.... we read it as adults (even Edgar Allan Poe by the way thought the novel was cool).

Kuroda Kanbei December 8th, 2016 10:00 AM

For my nation it would definitely be our founder, William of Orange. I don't entirely agree with that. I think the far more maligned Maurits or forgotten William III outshine our founder by a great deal and in the case of Maurits actually saved the cause his father failed to achieve even before his death.


Quote:

So no one in Italy thinks of Dante or Cicero or Cato anymore?
I'd put Caesar far above those two and would even argue Cato is unqualified to be an idol to begin with.

AlpinLuke December 8th, 2016 11:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David Vagamundo (Post 2660161)
Darn--recently bought I Promessi Sposi and plan to read it early next year!

So no one in Italy thinks of Dante or Cicero or Cato anymore?

Wait ... I'm focusing my attention on unified Italy. Manzoni is considered one of the fathers of modern Italian.

You are mentioning someone superior and from a well more ancient "Italic" history.

Among the great personages you list, Dante is still well alive [Italians study his Commedia in the High School with Manzoni's novel ...], Cicero is immortal. May be Cato, out of Classic Lyceum is no more that popular.

Seabas December 8th, 2016 11:38 AM

Yuriy Gagarin


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