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Old December 17th, 2016, 03:42 PM   #1

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America, Scotland, England


Scotland has a few very well know cultural features: whisky, haggis, the kilt etc. Whereas England tends not to have such well known things (other than a royal family that is top of some peoples list, tower bridge, trooping the colour etc). Is that the reason some Americans tend to like Scotland per say, or is there some real historical reasons for favouring Scotch over English?
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Old December 17th, 2016, 04:01 PM   #2

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Scotland has a few very well know cultural features: whisky, haggis, the kilt etc.
Next time you switch on your TV, turn on your light, answer your phone and drive on your tarred highways you would do well to remember you are bingeing on Scottish culture. As to everyone preferring the Jocks to the Hooray Henry's that is probably because we whipped their asses every time perfidious Albion turned their ambitious eyes North. It is just a pity that our greedy aristocracy sold us down the river in 1707.
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Old December 17th, 2016, 04:18 PM   #3

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What about 1825 ? Was it not Geo.IV that significantly wore a kilt when he (as the first British King to do so) arrived in Leith - in order to begin to bring the English and Scotch closer together? A process already under way ordinarily, between ordinary people; and via the French & Napoleonic Wars.
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Old December 17th, 2016, 04:26 PM   #4

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What about 1825 ? Was it not Geo.IV that significantly wore a kilt when he (as the first British King to do so) arrived in Leith - in order to begin to bring the English and Scotch closer together? A process already under way ordinarily, between ordinary people; and via the French & Napoleonic Wars.
You will have to excuse me sunshine if I do not respond again to your obvious attempt to wrap yourself in the St Georges Cross with your moronic thread which is specifically designed to create division and has no historical value whatsoever.
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Old December 17th, 2016, 04:33 PM   #5
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WELL....That gets the ball rolling doesn't it?
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Old December 17th, 2016, 04:40 PM   #6

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Next time you switch on your TV, turn on your light, answer your phone and drive on your tarred highways you would do well to remember you are bingeing on Scottish culture. As to everyone preferring the Jocks to the Hooray Henry's that is probably because we whipped their asses every time perfidious Albion turned their ambitious eyes North. It is just a pity that our greedy aristocracy sold us down the river in 1707.
Funnily enough, Thomas Edison, of America, appears to have invented the telephone, and Mr Hooley, of Swansea, invented tarmac.

What evidence do you have for a perfidious (untrustworthy) Albion? (and an ambitious Albion?).

What evidence do you have that England is made up of Hooray-henry's?

The people that sold Scotland down the river in 1707, included people that became tobacco barons and made Glasgow somewhat more wealthy than it had been or would have been??

And what basis do you have for your problem?
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Old December 17th, 2016, 05:30 PM   #7

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Thomas Edison, of America, appears to have invented the telephone
Several people were involved in experimentation. Bell however was the "first to develop commercially practical telephones" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invent...s_achievements
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Mr Hooley, of Swansea, invented tarmac
Hooley patented it. Macadam invented it. How do you explain the stuff being named after him?

I suggest you should do some research before attempting to rile the Scots on this forum.

Note: we are Scots NOT Scotch. The latter relates to whisky
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Old December 17th, 2016, 05:36 PM   #8
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Scotland has a few very well known cultural features: whisky, haggis, the kilt etc. Whereas England tends not to have such well known things (other than a royal family that is top of some peoples list, tower bridge, trooping the colour etc). Is that the reason some Americans tend to like Scotland per say, or is there some real historical reasons for favouring Scotch over English?
England has plenty of cultural stereotypes: tea, scones, brandy, warm ale. If these are less 'exciting' for Americans, it's simply because American culture is largely based on English culture, and English culture isn't exactly 'exotic' compared to Highland Scottish culture. The reason Americans are likely to identify with Scotland more is because Scottish heritage is a little rarer, and because 'English' identity is tied up with British identity, and America's national identity is largely as a breakaway state from the tyranny of British rule.

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Funnily enough, Thomas Edison, of America, appears to have invented the telephone, and Mr Hooley, of Swansea, invented tarmac.
Thomas Edison invented the carbon microphone, which is important in allowing a telephone to function, but he certainly didn't invent the telephone itself, any more than the person who invented the internal combustion engine can be said to have invented the car. And Edgar Hooley invented tarmac, which was an improvement on the 'macadam' construction technique invented by John McAdam: namely, he added tar to the macadam.

There's a lot of propaganda on 'who invented what', and the Scottish education system errs on the side of 'Scottish' whenever there is any kind of tenuous link with Scotland: as far as my primary teachers were concerned, Scotland pretty much invented most of the modern world. The most scandalous example is that of Alexander Graham Bell, who did not really invent the telephone in any meaningful way, although he was instrumental in bringing it to the mass market in America.

That being said, Scottish engineers and scientists, working in concert with English, American and Western European colleagues, certainly played a major part in the scientific insights, development, production and marketing of many of the great technological advances of the past 200 years, far more than could be expected of such a small country.

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The people that sold Scotland down the river in 1707, included people that became tobacco barons and made Glasgow somewhat more wealthy than it had been or would have been??
Glasgow in the early 1700s was a smallish city described as '"the cleanest and beautifullest and best built city in Britain" by Daniel Defoe. By the late 1800s, it was one of the largest cities and worst places to live in Europe - Glasgow had fully twice the level of 'overcrowded homes' as London, with two thirds of the residents of the city inhabiting overcrowded tenements, and only a third of London residents in similar situations (and by the way, London at that time was literally the most populous city on earth!).

Glasgow was only a wealthy city for wealthy people, for the poor it was hell on earth. For a while it was famous as a global centre of industry and the industrial elites provided some stunning architectural contributions, but apart from that the ordinary people of Glasgow didn't benefit much from the wealth, and suffered worse than most after the collapse of the empire.
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Old December 17th, 2016, 05:54 PM   #9

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... and the Klu Klux Klan?


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Next time you switch on your TV, turn on your light, answer your phone and drive on your tarred highways you would do well to remember you are bingeing on Scottish culture. As to everyone preferring the Jocks to the Hooray Henry's that is probably because we whipped their asses every time perfidious Albion turned their ambitious eyes North. It is just a pity that our greedy aristocracy sold us down the river in 1707.
... and the Klu Klux Klan?

Scottish settlers had a hand in America’s racist nightmare, with six Scottish-American former Confederate officers responsible for the formation of the Ku Klux Klan, according to the historian Neil Oliver.
Whisper it - KKK roots are Scottish - The Scotsman

Last edited by Kahu; December 17th, 2016 at 05:55 PM. Reason: Edited
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Old December 17th, 2016, 06:21 PM   #10

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The roots of the Klu Klux Klan are to be found rooted in the hearts of individuals. Not in nationality nor religion, but are rooted in those loathing’s that weigh so perilously on a diseased heart.


The linked article is a bunch of horse hockey.
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