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Old November 6th, 2017, 06:58 AM   #1

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The 100 year anniversary of the Great October Revolution


The revolution in real time:
https://project1917.com/october

I'd offer you to leave here your opinion about this revolution: what it was for the World history and what it could be without the Civil war in Russia after it and without the Entente's pressure? What do you think about reasons of the revolution and could the western society to help to prevent it?
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Old November 7th, 2017, 12:42 AM   #2

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What would 'western society' do? My Grandma and Grandad would have been about 17, but they didn't help :-)
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Old November 7th, 2017, 01:09 AM   #3
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Nothing great in a start of massacre of 100 millions called communism/socialism.

It was one of worst human blunders if not the worst. I'm sad that Denikin did not enter Moscow in 1919 and that Lenin was not put a bullet in his head asap but I do understand Germans why they have sent miserable sob and his gang of criminals to Russia in an armored train.

On such a day and anniversary we should be very sad. As with WWI and WWII anniversaries.
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Old November 7th, 2017, 02:16 AM   #4

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The Civil War was in no way great. It was not a revolution. It was evil versus good and this time evil won.
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Old November 7th, 2017, 03:41 AM   #5

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This anniversary helped to prompt my latest reading choice. I've spent this month steadily devouring the first two volumes of Stephen Kotkin's magisterial biography of Joseph Stalin: Paradoxes of Power (1878-1928) and Waiting for Hitler (1929-1941).

I cannot recommend them highly enough for anyone interested in this area of modern history. It's undoubtedly one of the best multi-volume biographies I've ever read - although "biography" as a descriptor doesn't really do justice to the scale of the geopolitical, social, and ideological perspective that Kotkin weaves into his account of Stalin's life.

The sections in the first volume dealing with the Russian Revolution are worth the price of admission alone. It was a genuine revelation to me that the course of events was so heavily dependent on the personalities of Lenin and Trotsky. It may have been more or less unavoidable that a leftist regime was going to supplant the Provisional Government, but the fact that it was the Bolsheviks who gained control of Russia was pretty much the opposite of inevitable. As Kotkin writes, the history of the 20th Century could have been altered out of all recognition with just two bullets.

Reading that history, I was also struck by certain aspects of continuity between the travails of the early Soviet Union and the old Tsarist regime. The Russian Revolution basically grew out of Imperial Russia's desperate need to modernize - economically, militarily, politically - in order to keep up with their European rivals, only to find that "modernization" badly undermined the historic power structure of the country. Tsar Nicholas II was an absolute fool, but many of the statesmen who served him were truly brilliant. But even the best of them couldn't devise a modernizing formula that didn't inflame the appetite of the masses for social changes that couldn't be satisfied without totally changing the character of the government. The best solution the Tsarist regime could come up with was mass political repression and trying to slow the pace of reform - but that just exacerbated the original problem of making Russia vulnerable to its geopolitical rivals, and brought the whole thing crashing down.

In the end, after the Bolsheviks had consolidated their rule, the dilemma was even more acute: it was imperative for them to modernize a peasant country, that was encircled by hostile capitalist powers. Enter Stalin, whose "solution" was to utilize the powers of totalitarian dictatorship to enforce the transition to fully collectivized industrial economy in the space of a decade, no matter how many lives were lost in the process. There was absolutely no reason except for sheer ideological madness that collectivization and industrialization had to be achieved simultaneously, and Stalin's fanatical refusal to deviate from his chosen course of action almost destroyed his government, and Russia. He was saved by the onset of the Great Depression, which made the Western powers so desperate for lucrative new partners for trade and investment that they were willing to bury the hatchet with one of the most evil regimes in the world.

The consequent "success" of Stalin's economic policies exerted a tragic influence over history, as subsequent Communist dictators - most notably including Mao - sought to emulate his example in the belief that the millions upon millions of deaths he had caused were a necessary, in fact desirable, part of becoming a (Marxist) great economic power.

It's strange to consider that if someone other than the Bolsheviks had wound up in control of Russia after WWI, Karl Marx might have become an obscure and relatively unimportant figure in the history of ideas. Instead, the chain of events and personalities that caused a party of fanatical ideological devotees to his creed to gain control of one of the great imperial powers of modern history, created a butcher's bill that defies calculation.
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Old November 7th, 2017, 03:58 AM   #6
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Click the image to open in full size.

Never, ever forget the Holy Royal Martyrs.
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Old November 7th, 2017, 04:12 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DIVUS IVLIVS View Post
This anniversary helped to prompt my latest reading choice. I've spent this month steadily devouring the first two volumes of Stephen Kotkin's magisterial biography of Joseph Stalin: Paradoxes of Power (1878-1928) and Waiting for Hitler (1929-1941).

I cannot recommend them highly enough for anyone interested in this area of modern history. It's undoubtedly one of the best multi-volume biographies I've ever read - although "biography" as a descriptor doesn't really do justice to the scale of the geopolitical, social, and ideological perspective that Kotkin weaves into his account of Stalin's life.

The sections in the first volume dealing with the Russian Revolution are worth the price of admission alone. It was a genuine revelation to me that the course of events was so heavily dependent on the personalities of Lenin and Trotsky. It may have been more or less unavoidable that a leftist regime was going to supplant the Provisional Government, but the fact that it was the Bolsheviks who gained control of Russia was pretty much the opposite of inevitable. As Kotkin writes, the history of the 20th Century could have been altered out of all recognition with just two bullets.

Reading that history, I was also struck by certain aspects of continuity between the travails of the early Soviet Union and the old Tsarist regime. The Russian Revolution basically grew out of Imperial Russia's desperate need to modernize - economically, militarily, politically - in order to keep up with their European rivals, only to find that "modernization" badly undermined the historic power structure of the country. Tsar Nicholas II was an absolute fool, but many of the statesmen who served him were truly brilliant. But even the best of them couldn't devise a modernizing formula that didn't inflame the appetite of the masses for social changes that couldn't be satisfied without totally changing the character of the government. The best solution the Tsarist regime could come up with was mass political repression and trying to slow the pace of reform - but that just exacerbated the original problem of making Russia vulnerable to its geopolitical rivals, and brought the whole thing crashing down.

In the end, after the Bolsheviks had consolidated their rule, the dilemma was even more acute: it was imperative for them to modernize a peasant country, that was encircled by hostile capitalist powers. Enter Stalin, whose "solution" was to utilize the powers of totalitarian dictatorship to enforce the transition to fully collectivized industrial economy in the space of a decade, no matter how many lives were lost in the process. There was absolutely no reason except for sheer ideological madness that collectivization and industrialization had to be achieved simultaneously, and Stalin's fanatical refusal to deviate from his chosen course of action almost destroyed his government, and Russia. He was saved by the onset of the Great Depression, which made the Western powers so desperate for lucrative new partners for trade and investment that they were willing to bury the hatchet with one of the most evil regimes in the world.

The consequent "success" of Stalin's economic policies exerted a tragic influence over history, as subsequent Communist dictators - most notably including Mao - sought to emulate his example in the belief that the millions upon millions of deaths he had caused were a necessary, in fact desirable, part of becoming a (Marxist) great economic power.

It's strange to consider that if someone other than the Bolsheviks had wound up in control of Russia after WWI, Karl Marx might have become an obscure and relatively unimportant figure in the history of ideas. Instead, the chain of events and personalities that caused a party of fanatical ideological devotees to his creed to gain control of one of the great imperial powers of modern history, created a butcher's bill that defies calculation.
Great post. Thanks.
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Old November 7th, 2017, 04:35 AM   #8

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Great post. Thanks.
Thank you for the compliment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sobieski View Post
Never, ever forget the Holy Royal Martyrs.
Truth be told, I find it difficult to muster sympathy for the Romanovs. What happened to them was tragic, but so was what happened to millions upon millions of other families around the same time.

It's impossible to know if more effective leadership in the generation prior to WWI might have averted the Russian Revolution, but it can be stated with reasonable certainty that the sheer bumbling incompetence of Nicholas II as a ruler was one of the primary factors that brought down the curtain on Imperial Russia.
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Old November 7th, 2017, 04:35 AM   #9

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RT is doing a series of re-enactments called Revolution 360







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Old November 7th, 2017, 04:47 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DIVUS IVLIVS View Post
Truth be told, I find it difficult to muster sympathy for the Romanovs. What happened to them was tragic, but so was what happened to millions upon millions of other families around the same time.

It's impossible to know if more effective leadership in the generation prior to WWI might have averted the Russian Revolution, but it can be stated with reasonable certainty that the sheer bumbling incompetence of Nicholas II as a ruler was one of the primary factors that brought down the curtain on Imperial Russia.
Then you have a cold heart. The slaughter of the crown was repulsive and reprehensible. They are true martyrs and sit on God's Divine Council as we speak, friend.

The Soviets went after THE CROWN and THE CHURCH. They wanted to uproot the traditional Russian society. That was their goal.
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