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Old November 10th, 2017, 06:28 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Lawnmowerman View Post
11th - Pope Urban II

12th - Saladin

13th - Ganghis Khan

14th - Jani Beg (bought the black death to Europe)

15th - Queen Isabella of Castile

16th - Martin Luther

17th - Louis XIV

18th - George Washington

19th - Napoleon Bonaparte

20th - Gavrilo Princip

21st - Osama Bin Laden
For the 15th century, I would say Mehmed II is more influential, simply for his sacking of Constantinople, alone. Many Greeks brought ancient works to some Italian states, largely launching Renaissance Humanism. The Ottomans blocked off European trade with Asia, which was largely responsible for the Portuguese navigators investigating alternative routes to Asia, especially the Spice Islands, lol. And one of the books brought back was the Greek New Testament and biblical inaccuracies with the Vulgate Bible was one of the big causes of the Protestant Reformation. And also the switch of the political capital of the Eastern Orthodox Church.
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Old November 10th, 2017, 06:30 AM   #22
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Last edited by mcpon; November 10th, 2017 at 06:45 AM.
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Old November 10th, 2017, 06:43 AM   #23
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Alternative list:

(Not saying that my list is better or worse. This is just an alternative. I apologize if this rubs anybody the wrong way. I don't mean to. )

11th - Guido of Arezzo
13th - Peter of Maricourt or Leonardo Fibonacci or Al-Jazari
14th - Ibn Khaldun
15th - Mehmed II or Luca Pacioli
16th - William Gilbert
17th - Otto von Guericke or William Paterson
18th - Abbes Sieyes or James Watt or John Kay (flying shuttle) or Abraham Darby I
19th - James Clerk Maxwell or Louis Pasteur or John Snow or Edwin Drake or Friedrich Wohler
20th - Malcolm McLean or Claude Shannon or Fritz Haber/Carl Bosch or Alexander Fleming or Henrietta Lacks
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Old November 10th, 2017, 08:39 AM   #24

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It's late and I'm about to go to be so I'm just going to copy paste from Wikki.

Arguably, Louis also applied himself indirectly to "the alleviation of the burdens of [his] subjects." For example, he patronised the arts, encouraged industry, fostered trade and commerce, and sponsored the founding of an overseas empire. Moreover, the significant reduction in civil wars and aristocratic rebellions during his reign are seen by these historians as the result of Louis' consolidation of royal authority over feudal elites.[103] In their analysis, his early reforms centralised France and marked the birth of the modern French state. They regard the political and military victories as well as numerous cultural achievements as the means by which Louis helped raise France to a preeminent position in Europe.[104] Europe came to admire France for its military and cultural successes, power, and sophistication. Europeans generally began to emulate French manners, values, goods, and deportment. French became the universal language of the European elite.
I agree with you about Louis XIV and him position in your post. Just wanted to hear your reasoning of putting him there.
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Old November 18th, 2017, 01:43 AM   #25
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For the 15th century, I would say Mehmed II is more influential, simply for his sacking of Constantinople, alone. Many Greeks brought ancient works to some Italian states, largely launching Renaissance Humanism. The Ottomans blocked off European trade with Asia, which was largely responsible for the Portuguese navigators investigating alternative routes to Asia, especially the Spice Islands, lol. And one of the books brought back was the Greek New Testament and biblical inaccuracies with the Vulgate Bible was one of the big causes of the Protestant Reformation. And also the switch of the political capital of the Eastern Orthodox Church.
That is utterly ridiculous, "renaissance" has slowly been happening in italian city states as they got wealthy from trade, and cultural fusion with various eastern churches and its followers was happening naturally thanx to crusades and venice owning alot of greek speeking region but the biggest accelerator of them all is the sack of Constantinople( it should be called the conquest of) resulted lots of valuable arts of antiquities being stolen and many residents with valuable skills being sold into slavery, this truly can be called the start of "renaissance" and if you include the latin emperor (who became rulers after sack of Istanbul) then looting of the east is even extended.
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Old November 18th, 2017, 05:33 AM   #26

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Many people on your list are heroic figures and often clouded with fable and mythology. Many have blood on their hands. They are taught to us from an early age as a narrative that gives meaning to the world. This is why people panic at the idea of getting rid of Columbus Day.


In contrast to many individuals on your list, the real and indispensable accomplishments of Isaac Newton and Johannes Kepler over shadow any mythology made up about these 2 men.


Missing from your list, I might include,


Galileo, who risked his life defying the church by saying the the earth revolved around the sun.


Gutenberg's implementation of movable type.


I would include Beethoven and Mozart.


James Watt who invented the first practical steam engine.


Dmitri Mendeleev who composed the periodic table of elements classifying in a way still used today.


Henry Ford for the modern assembly line.


Allan Turing for theorizing the concept of modern computing.


And yes, Robert Oppenheimer and Einstein.


These are people who really influenced the course of civilization.

Last edited by larkin; November 18th, 2017 at 05:38 AM.
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Old November 18th, 2017, 12:21 PM   #27
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The most important man in the 18th century was James Watt (steam engine)

The most important man in the 19th century was Clerk Maxwell (laws of electricity)

The most important man in the 20th century was Alan Turing (theory of the electronic computer)

The most important man in the 21st century is not Osama bin Laden.

Last edited by stevev; November 18th, 2017 at 12:24 PM.
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Old November 18th, 2017, 12:49 PM   #28
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I don't think you guys are giving Washington the credit for what he did AFTER the war, especially with the presidency.
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Old November 19th, 2017, 05:02 AM   #29

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The most important man in the 18th century was James Watt (steam engine)

The most important man in the 19th century was Clerk Maxwell (laws of electricity)

The most important man in the 20th century was Alan Turing (theory of the electronic computer)

The most important man in the 21st century is not Osama bin Laden.
I agree. It is cable news mythology for public consumption. I might choose instead, Elon Musk, but the verdict will not be in for another 83 years.
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Old November 19th, 2017, 01:36 PM   #30
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Its hard to disagree with it. Maybe MLK since he was the pinnacle of Civil Rights...
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