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Old December 5th, 2017, 01:22 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lawnmowerman View Post
Those people are all from the 20th Century. Hence invalid.
I suggest you go back and read the OP. Thanks.

Also, what a mean-spirited and totally unhelpful post. Do you not have anything more to contribute than rubbishing the contributions of others while adding nothing to the discussion yourself? You should be ashamed.
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Old December 5th, 2017, 02:10 AM   #42

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Quote:
Originally Posted by SufiMystic View Post
I suggest you go back and read the OP. Thanks.

Also, what a mean-spirited and totally unhelpful post. Do you not have anything more to contribute than rubbishing the contributions of others while adding nothing to the discussion yourself? You should be ashamed.

No. You have mis read the list.

Most important person from EACH century.

Bin Laden was not important in the 20th C.

He was very important in the 21st.

I may as well ask you the same question. Why do you continuously place Islam on a pedestal and fail to acknowledge that other non Islamic people were far more important to world affairs than any of those you have listed.
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Old December 5th, 2017, 02:13 AM   #43

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Originally Posted by SufiMystic View Post
That idiot? He's not worthy of appearing on the list (although I appreciate the significance of 9/11).

I'd say it's very difficult to narrow it down to one person per century. But the candidates for the 20th and 21st century are as follows:

20th century:

Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, founder of the Turkish Republic
Abdel Nasser, president of Egypt
Ayatollah Khomeini, founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran
Saddam Hussein, Iraqi dicator
Hassan al Banna, founder of the Muslim Brotherhood
Muhammad Ali Jinnah, founder of Pakistan
Muhammad Reza Pahlavi, Shah of Iran

21st century:

Recep Tayyip Erdogan, president of Turkey
Hassan Rouhani, president of Iran
Fethullah Gulen - Islamic cleric, currently in exile in US
I take the occasion to participate to this discussion commenting this post:

regarding 21st century, actually it's a bit early to have a conclusive say.

With reference to the list related to 20th century, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk wins, since what he did affected the geopolitical equilibriums and the development of the global context [not only Turkey].

Can we consider him the most important personage in 20th century in absolute?

It’s a historical evaluation which is not so easy to make. Probably I would prefer to indicate a group of figures, without electing one of them to the “absolute one”.

Ataturk is in that elite, with Albert Einstein, Gandhi, Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin, Hitler, Mao. May be we can add also Lenin and Kennedy.
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Old December 5th, 2017, 02:46 AM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlpinLuke View Post
With reference to the list related to 20th century, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk wins, since what he did affected the geopolitical equilibriums and the development of the global context [not only Turkey].

Can we consider him the most important personage in 20th century in absolute?

It’s a historical evaluation which is not so easy to make. Probably I would prefer to indicate a group of figures, without electing one of them to the “absolute one”.

Ataturk is in that elite, with Albert Einstein, Gandhi, Roosevelt, Churchill, Stalin, Hitler, Mao. May be we can add also Lenin and Kennedy.
I agree with the sentiments in this post.

One person for a whole century is really hard, especially with "the most recent 3 centuries" mentioned in the OP.

Even just choosing one for Europe, one for Asia, one for Americas, etc would be hard.

One of the other difficulties with a list like this is that it tends to favour men, because men were more historically prominent in politics, war and public life and the written record.

But if someone asked: what did women achieve? Every single human being on earth ever.

Last edited by SufiMystic; December 5th, 2017 at 02:52 AM.
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Old December 30th, 2017, 01:30 AM   #45

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I'm not particularly into making these kind of lists, but I'll still give it a try. It's very fun, after all.

So here's how my list looks like:

-----

I Augustus, St. Paul
II Trajan, Marcus Aurelius
III Diocletian, Aurelian
IV Constantine the Great, Augustine of Hippo
V Attila, Pope Leo I, Augustine of Hippo
VI Justinian, Pope Gregory the Great, Clovis I
VII Muhammad, Heraclius
VIII Charlemagne, Haroun al-Rashid, Charles Martel, Pepin the Younger
IX Charlemagne, St. Cyril and Methodius, Haroun al-Rashid, Simeon I of Bulgaria
X Basil II, Otto the Great, Hugh Capet
XI William the Conqueror, Alexios I Comnenos, Michael Cherularios
XII Henry II of England, Frederick Barbarossa, Innocent III, Philip Augustus, Manuel I Comnenos, Saladin
XIII Genghis Khan, Thomas Aquinas, Innocent III, Hulagu Khan, Osman I
XIV Timur, Kublai Khan, Johann Gutenberg
XV Christopher Columbus, Mehmed the Conqueror, Ferdinand and Isabella of Castille
XVI Suleiman the Magnificent, Akbar the Great, Charles V, Hernan Cortez, Nicholas Copernicus, Elizabeth I of England, Henry VIII, Ivan IV
XVII Louis XIV, Isaac Newton, Peter the Great, Galileo Galilei
XVIII Frederick the Great, Catherine the Great, James Watt, W.A. Mozart, Napoleon
XIX Napoleon, Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, Otto fon Bismarck, Abraham Lincoln
XX Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, V.I. Lenin, Winston Churchill, Mao Zedong, Albert Einstein, Henry Kissinger

Note: It's obviously centered around Western history, but it was a safe bet for me, considering my knowledge of the rest of the world as pretty modest

Last edited by Valens; December 30th, 2017 at 01:36 AM.
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Old January 2nd, 2018, 02:38 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lawnmowerman View Post
15th - Queen Isabella of Castile
I would replace her with Henry, the Navigator. He was the behind Portugals quest for naval conquest - creating both the shiptypes and the navigators that would explore and exploit Africa, America and - most important imho - the naval lanes to Asia, linking Asia and Europe directly. Many "Spanish" captains have learned their trade in the Portugese fleet.
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Old January 2nd, 2018, 02:50 AM   #47
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16th century - Maximilian.
A rather uncommon choice, but imho the person needs to be at a place where another character would have yielded a totally different timeline. Columbus, eg, was just a couple of years ahead of the Portugese discovery of Brazil (if at all) - he falling dead from a horse in 1491 would not have changed history substantially.

To Maximilian - with his own marriage he joined the fortunes of the well placed by poor house of Habsburg to the Burgundian Valois, defending most of the Burgundian heritage vs. the French crown and adding it to the Imperial crown - lesser men would have failed here. His two masterstrokes however where first the double-marriage of his children to the Spanish heirs - giving his grandson Charles not only the Dukedom of Burgund, but also the Crown of Spain and later the Emperorship. Then the second double marriage matched his granson and -daughter to the heirs of Hungary, creating the Austro-Hungarian double-monarchy after the desaster of Mohacs. During his lifetime he created the Spanish/German Habsburg empire practically by his own personality and diplomacy - and most of it without shedding blood.
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Old January 2nd, 2018, 03:02 AM   #48
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20th century.
Sorry, but have push out the elephant and say it: Adolf Hitler

The only contender here who by sheer personality would have changed world history similarly is Lenin - without whom their most likely no Soviet Union would have ever existed - still, Hitler brought the most devastating war of human history, and aside from that put mass murder on an unprecedented new level. Human ethics themself seemed to have changed, and there would be no UN, nor international law, without him.

Others mainly have local effect. Kemal Atatürk, eg, certainly is an important man for Turkey, but without him the history of nations two borders away would hardly have changed.
Turing - while instrumental and important - was not crucial to the development of the computer. IBM had data working machines in the pipeline, and Konrad Zuse had already built a first computer. They were already on their way. The big push for their development was the war (and the following cold war). That said, WW2 certainly would have developed far worse for us in the case of him missing.
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Old January 2nd, 2018, 03:21 AM   #49
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WW1 changed the world and a lot of the proposed 20th century candidates would not have been in a position to do what they did without WW1. Therefore I am partial to the OP's suggestion of Gavrilo Princip or at least the assassination of Franz Ferdinand as the single most important event of the century.


Albert Einstein is a good choice too though.
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Old January 2nd, 2018, 03:56 AM   #50
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Princip was just a tool. You can as well nominate the bullet that was fired. The man behind the act (though some here will argue) was Dragutin Dimitrijević (Apis). From there on you can track down the responsibilty for the outbreak of the war through the governments of Serbia, Austria-Hungary, Russia, Germany, France and Great-Britain - all of whom had members who could have stopped the war but did not, and some who actively promoted the war.

One of the main question should be: was this person instrumentally important for the specific road the future took, or would others have taken the same road? While WW1 was most unlucky in its outbreak, due to the multitude of people who could have stopped it and did not, this particular angry young man - willing to let others die for his convictions - was not that unique or important. He could have been replaced by many others - and actually there already were seven in that gang of would-be murderers.

On that other note: naturally ANY later event depends on its previous history. Well, most of it. That does not mean that all later events are instrumentally caused by whomever causes the precondition. If anything, Princip caused the conflict between Austria-Hungary and Serbia to escalate into a war. We should not blame or credit him for what diplomats made out of this war once it ended.

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