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Old October 29th, 2012, 05:13 AM   #11

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank81 View Post
In Spain, the flu (that was NOT Spanish) caused the larger death toll of the 20th century on a single year, larger than the worst years of the Civil War. The flu killed 300,000 people in 1918 alone, while from 1936 to 1939 the war killed 600,000 people

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Technically the source is still undetermined, anyway now we know it was an avian virus and this makes it quite probable it came from far east [probable, not certain].

BBC NEWS | Health | 1918 killer flu secrets revealed
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Old October 29th, 2012, 11:30 AM   #12

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What is true is that the origin of the flu was not in Spain. The first cases reported in the country were from May 1918, months after the first cases were reported in US and France.

Once I read that the flu originated in Kansas, this seem to be still the most common hypothesis. The first cases in Haskell took place in January, and I haven't known of earlier cases. But this origin is certainlly odd, large epidemies of this kind tend to originate in tropical areas.

Now I've read in wikipedia that an Austrian origin in 1917 was possible...


Do you have a graphic for Italy similar to that I posted about Spain?
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Old October 29th, 2012, 06:04 PM   #13

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank81 View Post
What is true is that the origin of the flu was not in Spain. The first cases reported in the country were from May 1918, months after the first cases were reported in US and France.

Once I read that the flu originated in Kansas, this seem to be still the most common hypothesis. The first cases in Haskell took place in January, and I haven't known of earlier cases. But this origin is certainlly odd, large epidemies of this kind tend to originate in tropical areas.

Now I've read in wikipedia that an Austrian origin in 1917 was possible...


Do you have a graphic for Italy similar to that I posted about Spain?
The initial outbreak (of multiple cases in one location that is) was traced to US Army training camps in Kansas but it picked up the name Spanish Influenza because Spain was not fighting in WW1 and had no war time censorship of the news. So the first reports of an outbreak to hit the papers was out of Spain which ended up giving it the deceptive name.
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Old November 8th, 2012, 06:35 PM   #14

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Thanks for all those posts guys, very informative, much appreciated
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Old November 9th, 2012, 12:49 AM   #15

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fire_Raven View Post
The initial outbreak (of multiple cases in one location that is) was traced to US Army training camps in Kansas but it picked up the name Spanish Influenza because Spain was not fighting in WW1 and had no war time censorship of the news. So the first reports of an outbreak to hit the papers was out of Spain which ended up giving it the deceptive name.
There was some book or study on it a couple of years ago, which concluded that the military secrecy in place during WWI very much helped spread the disease, since actual casualty numbers of the soldiers was withheld from the public, so noone was aware that a pandemic was in the making until it was way too late.
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Old November 9th, 2012, 05:06 AM   #16

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US mortality rate during 20th century, in this case the Flu is far more significant

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Old November 11th, 2012, 05:12 AM   #17

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From what i understand the misnamed Spnish flu of the last century started towards the end of WW1 and is a sort of bird flu, there seems to have been a higher proportion of young people dying from it. I have heard reports that this is not the first bird flu to do the rounds, perhaps young people had less reistance to it.
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Old November 11th, 2012, 05:26 AM   #18
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Spanish flu, as I understand, is mis-named. However It is a virus that attacked the healthy. The lungs of the healthy are vulnerable, so the most healthy will be attacked if coming into contact.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 12:45 PM   #19

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Quote:
Originally Posted by funakison View Post
From what i understand the misnamed Spnish flu of the last century started towards the end of WW1 and is a sort of bird flu, there seems to have been a higher proportion of young people dying from it. I have heard reports that this is not the first bird flu to do the rounds, perhaps young people had less reistance to it.

The flu caused an overreaction on strong inmune system, basically those of young people, which led to pneumonia and death.
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Old November 13th, 2012, 12:54 PM   #20

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Good posts all. For those wishing to learn more, John Barry's The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History is excellent!

The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History: John M. Barry: 9780143036494: Amazon.com: Books
The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History: John M. Barry: 9780143036494: Amazon.com: Books

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