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Old November 9th, 2012, 01:53 PM   #21

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Bill Bailey, Phil Jupitus and Rich Hall are my favourite panellists. I absolutely cannot STAND Johnny Vegas, but Sean Lock and Jimmy Carr are a lot more intelligent than they can appear.
I guess Johnny Vegas is an "either you hate him or love him" sort of guy.

And Jimmy Carr, yes, I am quite sure he has a touch of the idiot savant (or some other form of brilliant autism):


Sean Lock as well when it comes to witty comebacks. And surprisingly a lot more skilled than some of the more wellknown comedians, some of whom seems to be very out of their element in such a free for all general knowledge environment.
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Old November 10th, 2012, 04:44 AM   #22
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I watched the latest episode of QI last night. We are currently in the J series, so each of the 22 or so episodes in this series are about things beginning with that letter. Last night's episode - which I think was episode 8 of the series - was about jeopardy. The series run in alphabetical order, so the first series (back in 2003) was A, then the next series was B, and so on. So there will be in total 26 episodes, and we aren't even halfway through yet.

This quiz show is probably unique in that its answers are never what you think they are.

For example, if Stephen Fry, the host, asks the contestants the questions "What colour is Mars?" then, if one of them gives the obvious answer "red", then a siren would sound to show that they have given the obvious - and wrong - answer and the word "red" would flash up on the big screens as a form of humiliation!

Stephen Fry would then go on to explain that, contrary to popular belief, Mars isn't actually red and it just appears as red on false-colour NASA photographs (I remember this fact from the QI book, which has many fascinating questions and their unexpected answers from the series).

Points are awarded not only for right answers, but also for interesting ones, regardless of whether they are right or even relate to the original question. Points are deducted from a panellist who gives "answers which are not only wrong, but pathetically obvious", typically answers that are generally believed to be true but in fact are not. Points are also often deducted if an obvious joke answer is given.

So, at the end of the game, a contestant could find themselves on negative points.

Last edited by Brunel; November 10th, 2012 at 05:21 AM.
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Old November 10th, 2012, 04:55 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Magnate View Post
I just love this show and thanks to BBC entertainment i can actually watch this serie in Sweden.

Even tho its a comedy show it still teached me a lot about the world and its people and animals.

Something i never heard about before was the "frog test"

The Frog Test, the Birth of the Pregnancy Test
Lancelot Hogben discovered that the same test could be performed on the female African clawed frog. After being injected, if the frog produced eggs within 24 hours, the woman was pregnant. No killing, and yet the accuracy remained. This saved time, and even meant that frogs could be reused. The ‘Frog Test’ was the world’s first cheap and reliable pregnancy test and became the international standard for decades. At the end of the 1950′s it was finally supplanted by technology, technology which went on to produce the pregnancy tests we all know, but don’t all use.


The Frog Test, the Birth of the Pregnancy Test

What about you guys? Did QI teach you something?
There was a BRILLIANT thing I learnt in a recent episode. I think it was last week's episode, which I think is episode seven of the current series.

Towards the end of the episode, Stephen Fry said that he is about to do something that has NEVER been done before in the histiry of mankind. The contestants looked a bit doubtful and the audience went "Oooooooooohhh!".

Everybody wondered what it could possibly be.

He then pulled out a pack of playing cards and shuffled them in various different ways. He then explained that no pack of playing cards as EVER EVER been in the order which those playing cards are in now. The number of different combinations for a deck of 52 cards is so astronomical that it's almost certain that when you shuffle a deck the cards will end up in an order which no deck of cards have ever been in before.

Fry explained it like something like this:

It is a mathematical fact. The number of different ways that a pack of 52 playing cards can be shuffled is what mathematicians call "shriek 52!"

To calculate the possible combinations you have to calculate 52 x 51 x 50 x 49 x 48 etc, and should you wish to do this, the number below will be arrived at:

80, 658, 175, 170, 943, 878, 571, 660, 636, 856, 403, 766, 975, 289, 505, 440, 883, 277, 824, 000, 000, 000, 000

That’s a big number, but in order to help our understanding the following explanation was offered by Fry:

If every star in our galaxy had a trillion planets, and each planet had a trillion people living on it, and each person had a trillion packs of cards, which they somehow managed to shuffle simultaneously at 1000 times per second, and had done this since the big bang, they would only just, in 2012, be starting to get repeat shuffles. Wow!

From this fact we can ascertain that when you shuffle 52 playing cards then the result is almost certainly going to be unique.

In fact, I've just found the video of that bit here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5j-m...yer_detailpage

There would have been parts of this episode which were never shown. Because it was a normal 30 minute episode of QI. But a few days after each 30 minute episode there is also QI XL, which is the extended, 45 minute version of it.

Last edited by Brunel; November 10th, 2012 at 05:17 AM.
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Old November 10th, 2012, 05:14 AM   #24
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QI has taught me a lot, but the most important thing it's taught me is that you should never take anything QI says at face value. Always, always look it up and confirm it if you're going to use it as a fact in a discussion on, for example, a historical internet forum.
QI has a lot of researchers - known as QI elves - which spend a lot of time poring over books and on the internet for information for their questions.
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Old November 10th, 2012, 05:26 AM   #25

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One of the few programmes worth watching on telly, interesting that it's viewed in Sweden. Is it shown anywhere else?

I hear Time Team etc is shown in Australia, I wonder why a European version of Time Team isn't made? Surely it would be an enormous success?
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Old November 10th, 2012, 05:31 AM   #26
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One of the few programmes worth watching on telly, interesting that it's viewed in Sweden. Is it shown anywhere else?

I hear Time Team etc is shown in Australia, I wonder why a European version of Time Team isn't made? Surely it would be an enormous success?

Don't forget that QI is a BBC show and the BBC is shown all over the world.

QI would be shown in the Republic of Ireland because they get all the BBC channels we get (although they get them for free).

QI has been sold to Australia and New Zealand and the Dutch have made their own version of it.

There has been a petition set up to have the show aired in the USA.
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Old November 10th, 2012, 05:35 AM   #27

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Originally Posted by Brunel View Post
There was a BRILLIANT thing I learnt in a recent episode. I think it was last week's episode, which I think is episode seven of the current series.

Towards the end of the episode, Stephen Fry said that he is about to do something that has NEVER been done before in the histiry of mankind. The contestants looked a bit doubtful and the audience went "Oooooooooohhh!".

Everybody wondered what it could possibly be.

He then pulled out a pack of playing cards and shuffled them in various different ways. He then explained that no pack of playing cards as EVER EVER been in the order which those playing cards are in now. The number of different combinations for a deck of 52 cards is so astronomical that it's almost certain that when you shuffle a deck the cards will end up in an order which no deck of cards have ever been in before.

Fry explained it like something like this:

It is a mathematical fact. The number of different ways that a pack of 52 playing cards can be shuffled is what mathematicians call "shriek 52!"

To calculate the possible combinations you have to calculate 52 x 51 x 50 x 49 x 48 etc, and should you wish to do this, the number below will be arrived at:

80, 658, 175, 170, 943, 878, 571, 660, 636, 856, 403, 766, 975, 289, 505, 440, 883, 277, 824, 000, 000, 000, 000

That’s a big number, but in order to help our understanding the following explanation was offered by Fry:

If every star in our galaxy had a trillion planets, and each planet had a trillion people living on it, and each person had a trillion packs of cards, which they somehow managed to shuffle simultaneously at 1000 times per second, and had done this since the big bang, they would only just, in 2012, be starting to get repeat shuffles. Wow!

From this fact we can ascertain that when you shuffle 52 playing cards then the result is almost certainly going to be unique.

In fact, I've just found the video of that bit here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5j-m...yer_detailpage

There would have been parts of this episode which were never shown. Because it was a normal 30 minute episode of QI. But a few days after each 30 minute episode there is also QI XL, which is the extended, 45 minute version of it.


Large Number Theory is a wonderful subject, although I completely suck at maths, I enjoy trying to understand things in their relative scale.

Have a look at this:




It will make your brain explode.
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Old November 10th, 2012, 05:38 AM   #28

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Don't forget that QI is a BBC show and the BBC is shown all over the world.

QI would be shown in the Republic of Ireland because they get all the BBC channels we get (although they get them for free).

QI has been sold to Australia and New Zealand and the Dutch have made their own version of it.

There has been a petition set up to have the show aired in the USA.

Aye although the Americans usually make their own versions which are rarely as good imho. The American office isn't as good as the original and their version of The Inbetweeners sucks in comparison.

I wish we'd make a British version of Fraser though.
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Old November 10th, 2012, 05:40 AM   #29
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Not quite, a minority of astronomers did, they deliberately ignored the majority who didn't. What's more they actually revisited the question in a later show, where they updated the number of "moons" as the right answer to 3 or 4, saying that there had since been discovered more similar to Cruithne, and that was at a time when the Cruithne moon theory had already been completely debunked.

There are many more instances of such deliberate misinformation in order to be entertaining, but I forget the details.
There is no deliberate misinformation on QI. Any mistakes are just that - genuine mistakes.

In fact, QI fans regularly contact the show to correct information.

The error that has attracted the most complaints to date (probably from the typical easily-angered mad Welshmen of the type of Iolo or Llewellyn from the BBC's The Green Green Grass) was made in Series B, when it was claimed that the Welsh language has no word for blue. In fact it is glas. The error was explained on the "Banter" section of the series B DVD as a mistake on the part of producer John Lloyd himself.

Another episode in Series B claimed that the language spoken by children's TV characters Bill and Ben was called "Flobbadob" and was named after the onomatopoeic phrase that creator Hilda Brabban's younger brothers (after whom the characters were named) gave to their bath farts during their early childhood. However, in Series D, Fry read out a letter written by Silas Hawkins, the son of veteran voice-over talent Peter Hawkins, who provided the original voices of the characters:
The fart-in-the-bath story was trotted out last year in an episode of Stephen Fry's otherwise admirable quiz show QI. It (the story) first appeared some twenty years ago in a newspaper article, to which my father immediately wrote a rebuttal. This was obviously ferreted out by some BBC researcher. It may be quite interesting, but in this case, it simply isn't true.
Fry then apologised and corrected the error, saying, "Their language is called 'Oddle poddle'. 'Flobbadob' means 'Flowerpot' in Oddle poddle." He then convulsed in disbelief at the authoritativeness in which he had read that statement out.

In Series A, in an episode about animals, the show claimed that the longest animal in the world was the lion's mane jellyfish, but this was later corrected in Series C, saying that the longest animal in the world is the bootlace worm.

QI's makers have also pointed out the error they made about Cruithne in an episode of the first series Series A. The episode was about astronomy.

But, when you consider all the questions they have had on QI in nine years, then mistakes on the show are rare.
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Old November 10th, 2012, 05:46 AM   #30
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Aye although the Americans usually make their own versions which are rarely as good imho. The American office isn't as good as the original and their version of The Inbetweeners sucks in comparison.

I wish we'd make a British version of Fraser though.
I've heard that the Americans want to make their own version of Only Fools and Horses, too, but David Jason has said he would think an American version would be rubbish compared to the British one as Americans just cannot "do" British humour.
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