Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > World History Forum > General History
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

General History General History Forum - General history questions and discussions


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old November 19th, 2012, 04:25 PM   #21
Supended myself
 
Joined: Sep 2012
From: Valles Marineris, Mars
Posts: 4,829

Wu Zetian: Women Regent of China(Tang) expanded the Tang Empire, bought stability to China

Click the image to open in full size.
Gorge123 is offline  
Remove Ads
Old November 19th, 2012, 07:49 PM   #22

Sankari's Avatar
What we have, we hold
 
Joined: Mar 2011
From: 6th Century Constantinople
Posts: 3,334
Blog Entries: 1
Thumbs up


Edith Cowan, an Australian legend:

Quote:
Cowan became concerned with social issues and injustices in the legal system, especially with respect to women and children. In 1894 she helped found the Karrakatta Club, a group where women "educated themselves for the kind of life they believed they ought to be able to take".

In time she became the club's president. The Karrakatta Club became involved in the campaign for women's suffrage, successfully gaining the vote for women in 1899.

After the turn of the century Cowan turned her eye to welfare issues. She was particularly concerned with women's health and the welfare of disadvantaged groups, such as disadvantaged children and prostitutes. She became extraordinarily active in women's organisations and welfare organisations, serving on numerous committees.

The building of Perth's King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women in 1916 was largely a result of her efforts. She helped form the Women's Service Guilds in 1909 and was a co-founder of the Western Australia's National Council of Women, serving as president from 1913 to 1921 and vice-president until her death.

In 1916 Cowan became Freemason, admitted to the Australian federation of Droit Humain.

Cowan believed that children should not be tried as adults and, accordingly, founded the Children's Protection Society. The society had a major role in the subsequent introduction of children's courts. In 1915 she was appointed to the bench of the new court and continued on in this position for eighteen years.

In 1920 Cowan became one of the first female Justices of the Peace. Her great great nephew David Malcolm followed in her footsteps, by becoming Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Western Australia in 1988.

During World War I Cowan collected food and clothing for soldiers at the front and coordinated efforts to care for returned soldiers. She became chairperson of the Red Cross Appeal Committee and was rewarded when, in 1920, she was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE).

In 1920 Western Australia passed legislation allowing women to stand for parliament. At the age of 59 Cowan stood as the Nationalist candidate for the Legislative Assembly seat of West Perth because she felt that domestic and social issues were not being given enough attention.

She won a surprise victory, ironically defeating the Attorney General, Thomas Draper, who had introduced the legislation that enabled her to stand. She championed women's rights in parliament, pushing through legislation which allowed women to be involved in the legal profession.

She succeeded in placing mothers in an equal position with fathers when their children died without having made a will, and was one of the first to promote sex education in schools. However, she lost her seat at the 1924 election and failed to regain it in 1927.

In her final years she was an Australian delegate to the 1925 International Conference of Women held in the United States. She helped to found the Royal Western Australian Historical Society in 1926 and assisted in the planning of Western Australia's 1929 Centenary celebrations.

Though she remained involved in social issues, illness forced her to withdraw somewhat from public life in later years. Cowan died in 1932, at the age of 70, and was buried in Karrakatta Cemetery.

...

Cowan's portrait was featured on an Australian postage stamp in 1975, as part of a six-part "Australian Women" series. During the WAY 1979 sesquicentennial celebrations, a plaque was laid in St Georges Terrace in her honour.

In 1984 the federal Division of Cowan was created and named after her, and in January 1991 the Western Australian College of Advanced Education was renamed Edith Cowan University (ECU).

Her portrait appears on the Australian fifty dollar note, a polymer banknote that was first issued in October 1995. In 1996 a plaque honouring her was placed in St George's Cathedral.

There are references to her in a public art installation in Kings Park that was unveiled in November 1999 to commemorate the centenary of women's suffrage, and in a tapestry that was hung in King Edward Memorial Hospital in 2000 to honour women involved in the hospital.
Sankari is offline  
Old November 19th, 2012, 08:05 PM   #23

Spartacuss's Avatar
If I'm lyin' I'm dyin'...
 
Joined: Jul 2010
From: Georgia, USA
Posts: 6,343

Jeanette Rankin is a favorite of mine in the history of politics in America. As congresswoman she voted against the declaration of war against Germany in 1917 and was voted out of office. She regained her seat, voted against the declaration of war against Japan in 1941, and was voted out of office again. I admire her greatly for her staying true to her personal convictions against war, but I also have to say she was not there to represent her personal feelings. It was the wishes of her constituency she failed to represent. Still, I admire her courage in those votes.
Spartacuss is online now  
Old November 20th, 2012, 05:47 AM   #24

antonina's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2011
From: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 5,406

Quote:
Originally Posted by M.E.T.H.O.D. View Post
Caterina Sforza, Countess of Forlì and Lady of Imola, "The Lioness of Romagna"(1463-1509)
Click the image to open in full size.
Daughter of the Duke of Milan, Galeazzo Maria Sforza(assassinated in 1476) and wife of Girolamo Riario(assassinated in 1488), a great patron of musicians, poets, philosophers, admired as one of the most fashionable and educated women of the Renaissance.
Caterina also proved to be a very strong(she had a fine political and military know-how, she personally commanded the militia of Forlì to a staunch defence against the forces of Cesare Borgia) and sometimes(here it comes the awful point) an extremely violent woman( after the death of her husband and later of her son Ottaviano, Caterina ordered the indiscriminate execution of women, children and other innocent, simply guilty of being related with the perpetrators)
I recall reading some speculations about this lady being the origin for Mona Lisa... here, I've located the article:

Mona Lisa revealed as adventurous beauty | World news | guardian.co.uk
antonina is offline  
Old November 20th, 2012, 05:56 AM   #25

antonina's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2011
From: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 5,406

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank81 View Post
In Spain Agustina de Aragón - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia , inspired adoration and legends among the Spaniards. During the first siege of Saragossa, when she found herself on the war devastation, she walked among the death on the streets and handled alone a cannon, in front of the French troops, firing it. This led to men around to come back again to battle

Goya, Los Desastres de la Guerra - Qué Valor (What a brave!)

Click the image to open in full size.
Interesting information Frank, I've had a book of these Goya etchings for years and didn't realise there war a real-life model for this particular one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank81 View Post
Rosalía de Castro - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia was one of the best Spanish writers belonging to Romanticism movement. Her works are some like Jane Austen had finished in a sad way all of her stories She was enough brave to vindicate Gallician language, in an age that writing in "minor dialects" was badly considered
Is Galician a dialect of Spanish, then? I've always thought there was just one Galicia - the one my family hails from
antonina is offline  
Old November 20th, 2012, 06:04 AM   #26

antonina's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2011
From: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 5,406

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sankari View Post
Click the image to open in full size.



Mind - married at 17 and five children (clear indicator children don't hinder a woman's progress!) She seems to have experienced terrible family tragedy as a teenager and turned it for the good.
antonina is offline  
Old November 20th, 2012, 06:06 AM   #27

srb7677's Avatar
Liberal Crusader
 
Joined: Dec 2010
From: Plymouth,UK
Posts: 2,340

Quote:
Originally Posted by antonina View Post
Is Galician a dialect of Spanish, then? I've always thought there was just one Galicia - the one my family hails from
Yes, there are two Galicias - the one in southern Poland and the one in Spain. No doubt they are both pronounced differently.

There are also two Georgias, the one in the Caucasus and the one in the USA.
srb7677 is offline  
Old November 20th, 2012, 06:11 AM   #28

srb7677's Avatar
Liberal Crusader
 
Joined: Dec 2010
From: Plymouth,UK
Posts: 2,340

Margaret Thatcher - great, fascinating, and awful all rolled into one.
srb7677 is offline  
Old November 20th, 2012, 06:17 AM   #29

Frank81's Avatar
Guanarteme
 
Joined: Feb 2010
From: Canary Islands-Spain
Posts: 2,523

Quote:
Originally Posted by antonina View Post


Is Galician a dialect of Spanish, then? I've always thought there was just one Galicia - the one my family hails from

Galicia is the most northwestern region of Spain, is a region with a very strong personality. They speak Galician, which is very close to Portuguese. So close, that authors usually don't split them. So, Galician is not a dialect but a language. However, time ago it was wrongly considered to be a "minor dialect" of Spanish

I remember years ago when I learnt about a "Galitzia" on the other side of Europe, very curious for me . I found the region to be just totally opposite to what Spanish Galicia is, but fascinating whatever the case.
Frank81 is online now  
Old November 20th, 2012, 06:28 AM   #30

antonina's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: Mar 2011
From: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 5,406

Quote:
Originally Posted by srb7677 View Post
Yes, there are two Galicias - the one in southern Poland and the one in Spain. No doubt they are both pronounced differently.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank81 View Post
Galicia is the most northwestern region of Spain, is a region with a very strong personality. They speak Galician, which is very close to Portuguese. So close, that authors usually don't split them. So, Galician is not a dialect but a language. However, time ago it was wrongly considered to be a "minor dialect" of Spanish
Thanks a lot guys and sorry about my ignorance Frank.

Quote:
Originally Posted by srb7677 View Post
I remember years ago when I learnt about a "Galitzia" on the other side of Europe, very curious for me . I found the region to be just totally opposite to what Spanish Galicia is, but fascinating whatever the case.
Yes, our Galicja was a curious region, Norman Davies describes it wonderfully in "Vanished Kingdoms".
antonina is offline  
Reply

  Historum > World History Forum > General History

Tags
awful, fascinating, simply, women


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Where the German soldiers of WWII aware of the awful doings of Adolf? Currahee War and Military History 101 June 18th, 2013 02:56 AM
Interracial war rapes of white women, asian women, black women by other race in 20th KingButler War and Military History 31 October 13th, 2012 10:41 AM
Bad & Awful Books tjadams History Book Reviews 48 September 19th, 2011 06:08 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.