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Old December 11th, 2012, 04:20 PM   #41
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I like the French Revolution because I find guillotines and chaos interesting, especially when it is followed by the incredible career of Napoleon. His era was exceptional to me.
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Old December 11th, 2012, 04:35 PM   #42

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I like the French Revolution because I find guillotines and chaos interesting, especially when it is followed by the incredible career of Napoleon. His era was exceptional to me.
Interestingly enough, the guillotine was not created by it's namesake, but rather in England.

Yes, the period is fascinating.
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Old December 11th, 2012, 06:17 PM   #43

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Maccabean Revolt. It's as interesting as the Jewish Revolt of 66, but with the side of righteousness winning!
Indeed. It is interesting to note that the Seleucid army turned back over internal problems following the death of Antiochus IV, while the Romans did not.
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Old December 11th, 2012, 06:25 PM   #44

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Silva's solution to the problem of reaching Masada was typical Roman ingenuity at its best. I believe there were two survivors though, a mother and her child. She could not bring herself to kill them both.
I've read about that and my memory is a little fuzzy. The survivors & i could be absolutely wrong about this, but weren't they slaves?

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The Judean wars were brutal affairs, and I remember when I first read the commentaries of the war by Josephus, and thinking how graphic an illustratio of warfare it was.
I guess most people are introduced to the graphic nature of Roman warfare by the works of Josephus. In fact and unless the matter has been settled, some historians think Josephus was a bit biased in favor of the Romans, regardless of him being Jewish. Has this matter been settled?
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Old December 12th, 2012, 05:37 AM   #45
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Interestingly enough, the guillotine was not created by it's namesake, but rather in England.

Yes, the period is fascinating.
Yep.

The first guillotine was the Halifax Gibbet, which was used in the town of Halifax, Yorkshire (now West Yorkshire).

It was probably installed some time during the 16th century as an alternative to beheading by axe or sword. Halifax was once part of the Manor of Wakefield, where ancient custom and law gave the Lord of the Manor the authority to execute summarily by decapitation any thief caught with stolen goods to the value of 13d or more, or who confessed to having stolen goods of at least that value. Decapitation was a fairly common method of execution in England, but Halifax was unusual in two respects: it employed a guillotine-like machine that appears to have been unique in the country, and it continued to decapitate petty criminals until the mid-17th century.

A replica of the Halifax Gibbet stands on its original site in the town.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old December 12th, 2012, 06:11 AM   #46

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Yep.

The first guillotine was the HalifaxGibbet, which was used in the town of Halifax, Yorkshire (now West Yorkshire)...
Didn't know that, thanks.
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Old December 12th, 2012, 06:33 AM   #47

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Maratha war of independence vs mughals.
Turkish war of independence under ataturk
vietnamese wars of independence first under trang hang dao vs mongols and then against french/colonial which spelled over into conflict with america and finally ended with the bloody repulse of the chinese invasion.
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Old December 12th, 2012, 06:56 AM   #48

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I guess most people are introduced to the graphic nature of Roman warfare by the works of Josephus. In fact and unless the matter has been settled, some historians think Josephus was a bit biased in favor of the Romans, regardless of him being Jewish. Has this matter been settled?
No, but I'll be settling it when I start writing my doctoral dissertation, as this is the precise topic I'll be looking at!
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Old December 12th, 2012, 07:01 AM   #49

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(And also, he may have been Jewish but he was also Roman. Titus Flavius Josephus, the "Jewish" historian, has just as much right to be described as a "Roman historian" as Publius Cornelius Tacitus, who was knocking around at the same time as him. But he never is called that - he's always Josephus, "the Jewish historian"!)
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Old December 12th, 2012, 07:04 AM   #50
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(And also, he may have been Jewish but he was also Roman. Titus Flavius Josephus, the "Jewish" historian, has just as much right to be described as a "Roman historian" as Publius Cornelius Tacitus, who was knocking around at the same time as him. But he never is called that - he's always Josephus, "the Jewish historian"!)
As the shameless collaborationist that he never pretended to disguise to be, Titus Flavius Josephus proudly called himself by his unmistakable citizen Roman tria nomina.
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