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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:21 AM   #1
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Titanic!


Just a wild speculation. What happened to the ice berg that sank the Titanic? * The berg was four times larger then the Titanic. The ship did not have enough life boats. If the crew had thought outside the box could they have deposited survivors on the berg? Perhaps saving many more people?
* Yes, I know that it eventually melted.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:24 AM   #2

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Just a wild speculation. What happened to the ice berg that sank the Titanic? The berg was four times larger then the Titanic. The ship did not have enough life boats. If the crew had thought outside the box could they have deposited survivors on the berg? Perhaps saving many more people?
How the fek do you ferry people onto a floating berg of ice in the middle of the Atlantic?

It was an Ice berg not a nice floating sheet like you'd get in the arctic or antarctic but a big lump of ice broken of a glacier.

They should of course just hit the thing and not tried to avoid it-- expensive embarrassing but alive.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:33 AM   #3
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You are absolutely sure that there wasn't any flat areas? True, icebergs can get tall but to say that at water's edge it is always a 90 degree vertical, seems unlikely. But I suppose you must be an iceberg expert. I am not. I admire your passion (fek)
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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:35 AM   #4
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Just a wild speculation. What happened to the ice berg that sank the Titanic? * The berg was four times larger then the Titanic. The ship did not have enough life boats. If the crew had thought outside the box could they have deposited survivors on the berg? Perhaps saving many more people?
* Yes, I know that it eventually melted.
It must have taken the Titanic Captain & engineer some time before they knew the ship was going to sink. How far from the iceberg was the Titanic when this certainty of sinking became known? You then have to steer the ship around and locate the iceberg in the pitch black. All that before you even get to the problems Kevinmeath mentions.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:39 AM   #5
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I think that (considering that the life boats were not full) it is obvious that the crew was not thinking,out of the box or otherwise. Understandable, considering the panic.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:40 AM   #6

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...........................

............................. I admire your passion (fek)
Fek is an 'Irish' word ,that does not replace F~#*k in anyway of course!, and is used by mainstream society often-- I've heared the Nuns use it in 'daily' conversation!! it makes you stop first couple of times!
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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:43 AM   #7
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I have no idea how far the berg was from the ship after the collision. I don't even know if the berg shattered. As I said in the OP, just speculating.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 02:17 PM   #8

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A ship the size of the Titanic would probably take at least several miles to stop, even if a collision with an iceberg was involved. Somewhere in the region of 10 miles to heave to completely. At sea level, the horizon is around 4 miles away, so they may have been able to still see the berg, but it was dark by the time the lifeboats were lowered and you'd not be able to see far from one of those.

The sea is very disorientating at the best of times, more so in a small boat like a lifeboat. And their main concern would be with getting as far away as possible before she went down. Any small boats nearby would almost certainly get sucked down with her.

My guess is that she was a fair distance from the berg when it became apparent that evacuation was needed. Some believed her to be very hard to sink, remember.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 08:43 PM   #9

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I think that (considering that the life boats were not full) it is obvious that the crew was not thinking,out of the box or otherwise. Understandable, considering the panic.
lack of panic caused many of the boats to be lowered half empty. Most people were reluctant to get into the boats, because they were expecting another ship to come along and rescue them, and prefered to wait until it appeared. This is what was supposed to happen, and it seems there is still some uncertainty about why it didn't. Shipping lanes were busy in those days, and there appears to have been ships within reach. If it had been possible to land people on the iceberg, it was probably too late by the time they realised that no ship was going to come in time.

in 'Titanic Survivor' Violet Jessop, who was a stewardess on the Titanic, described the scene vividly:

'Reluctantly, slowly, people started up the companions, still inclined to chat by the way, some joking and quite unhurried, taking their time about it. From above, officers' anxious faces peered down, loathe to give undue alarm but wishing people would besyir themselves. To those few who showed concern, a reassuring answer was forthcoming "there are plenty of boats in the vicinity; they'll be with us any moment now.". Those dear youngsters in the cabink opposite us thought it was all a "grand show".

Out on deck, the first arguments started over who would and who wouldn't go into the boats which appeared to be suspended miles abovd the yawning blackness below.

Nobody was anxious to move; Titanic seemed to steady. To justify their reluctance, some pointed to a light on the horizon; another ship's lights! People were reassured, content to bide their time.

One boat was already being lowered with very few people in it. When this was pointed out as a shining example by the officer near me, he got a rather alarming responsr as the crowd surged forward to embark. The boat was lowered very full, almost too full this time; and so on. Always some held back in need of coaxing while a few were too eager.

Glancing forward I caught my breath as a white rocket shot up, then another. Distress rockets! They went very high with great noise. The lights on the horizon seemed to come nearer. That cheered uo the group about us, who had slowly started to fill a boat. Young officers urged them to greater speed, showing unlimited patience, I thought.'

Last edited by Louise C; March 8th, 2013 at 09:03 PM.
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Old March 8th, 2013, 10:01 PM   #10

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A ship the size of the Titanic would probably take at least several miles to stop, even if a collision with an iceberg was involved. Somewhere in the region of 10 miles to heave to completely. At sea level, the horizon is around 4 miles away, so they may have been able to still see the berg, but it was dark by the time the lifeboats were lowered and you'd not be able to see far from one of those.

The sea is very disorientating at the best of times, more so in a small boat like a lifeboat. And their main concern would be with getting as far away as possible before she went down. Any small boats nearby would almost certainly get sucked down with her.

My guess is that she was a fair distance from the berg when it became apparent that evacuation was needed. Some believed her to be very hard to sink, remember.
^This. Plus, i would add that it would have been a pointless exercise. Probably by the time she had turned around and made it's way to the berg her bow would likely be under water and any orderly transfer, not even a chaotic one, would have been out of the question. The same numerical amount of people would still have been lost, if not more. And if they were to ferry people to and from the berg using the life boats, it still wouldn't have made a difference. By the time any one single boat made a first successful return trip to the ship, the Titanic would have already disappeared beneath the waves and half the people in the water would already be dead and the other nearly succumbing to hypothermia.
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