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Old November 21st, 2012, 05:23 AM   #101

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That baseball was ''founded'' by Abner Doubleday in Cooperstown, New York, U.S.A. in 1837.
In fact, a full set of rules of the game of baseball was published in 1733 in London, England, and can be seen in the British Museum, London, England.
We have in germany a similar game, called Schlagball. The first rules are from the end of the 18th century. So it seems to have been a common game in old europe or at least in parts of it.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 06:08 AM   #102

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Mythconception: Britain won at Dunkirk. They merely managed a well manner retreat.
I have never heard of anyone who ever thought that Dunkirk was a victory. Churchill stated that in a radio speech the day following the evacuation.
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Mythconception: Germany planned to occupy the whole of Great Britain. "Opperation Sealion", the book of this, was written by Peter Fleming (brother to Ian Fleming) who was working for the Intrepid Organization (British Intelligence).
Unternehmen Seelöwe was a plan for the Invasion of Great Britain drawn up by the German High Command following Hitler's Führer Directive No. 16 on 16 July 1940. Plans previously developed in the Kriegsmarine in 1939 by Kapitan Hans Jürgen Reinicke and the Wehrmacht in Case Nordwest were incorporated. Goering had flatly rejected any invasion of Britain in 1939 and early 1940 and reluctantly ordered the planning of Unternehmen Adlerangriff . Original copies of the German planning documents and correspondence are available at the British Archive and the US Library of Congress, including the orders from Heydrich to SS General Six to set up the Einsatzgruppen in Britain.
Peter Fleming was in the Grenadier Guards in 1940 and was still in Norway in May. He was seconded to Col. Colin Gubbins (as was his brother) to set up the "Auxiliary units"--the stay-behind British resistance. He then moved to Greece in 1941 as a military intelligence officer and in 1942 to the Far East where his skills in oriental languages were put to use developing deception plans against the Japanese both for SEAC and for the Chinese Army.
There was no such thing as "The Intrepid Organisation"; there was an organisation called "British Security Co-ordination" (BSC) run by Sir William Stephenson, jokingly referred to by WS Churchill as "Our Man Intrepid" at a dinner party after an Edwardian Boys Adventure story. The author of "Our Man Intrepid", a highly speculative account of BSC's activities, thought that Intrepid was Stephenson's code name. It wasn't. BSC worked exclusively in the Americas, principally the USA churning out propaganda, bumping off Germans and pro-German Americans and secretly training friends of Bill Donavan to become future OSS officers.

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Mythconception: Rudolf Hess flew to Britain. Someone flew to Britain who resembled Hess, but both the serial number of the crashed number of the plane crashed in England was wrong, and the man captured as 'hess' did not have scarrs which Hess recieved in WWI.
There are as many conspiracies about Hess as there are about Kennedy. It is possible, even likely that Hess flew to Britain by invitation, but the man who arrived, stood trial and died in Spandau was definitely Hess and the claims of conspiracy seekers unproven. We can find out in 2045 when the fils are opened.
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Mythconception: Briain was never occupied during WWII. The Channel Islands are a part of Britain. They were occupied by Germany during the war, ergo part of Britain was occupied during the war.
No, the Channel Islands are part of the Duchy of Normandy, not part of Britain.

Last edited by Ancientgeezer; November 21st, 2012 at 06:24 AM.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 06:59 AM   #103

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Admiral Nelson did not say 'kiss me hardy' just before he died.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 09:18 PM   #104

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That the flag raising on Mt. Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima was staged, and that the Marines were posed by the photographer.

In fact there was video taken of the flag being raised at the same time that Joe Rosenthal snapped his now famous photograph, proving that it wasn't staged. The myth lived on however because the video footage was not as well known, and because of a misunderstanding of a comment made by Rosenthal to other reporters.


The other myth surrounding the flag raising is that it occured at the end of the battle. It actually occured early on in the battle, and the seizure of Mt. Suribachi was just one of several of the invasion's objectives. Of the six Marines captured in Rosenthal's photograph, three would later be killed in action on Iwo Jima.
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Old November 22nd, 2012, 02:13 AM   #105

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That the flag raising on Mt. Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima was staged, and that the Marines were posed by the photographer.

In fact there was video taken of the flag being raised at the same time that Joe Rosenthal snapped his now famous photograph, proving that it wasn't staged. The myth lived on however because the video footage was not as well known, and because of a misunderstanding of a comment made by Rosenthal to other reporters.

Video footage of the flag raising

The other myth surrounding the flag raising is that it occured at the end of the battle. It actually occured early on in the battle, and the seizure of Mt. Suribachi was just one of several of the invasion's objectives. Of the six Marines captured in Rosenthal's photograph, three would later be killed in action on Iwo Jima.
I am afraid that you have got yourself totally mixed up.
You can check your facts here
Raising_the_Flag_on_Iwo_Jima Raising_the_Flag_on_Iwo_Jima
The iconic flag raising was the SECOND flag raising of the day. The supression of the first flag raising photographs by Lowery has been a matter of contention and has led to the accusations of the staging of the second raising by Rosenthal.
There was no such thing as video in 1945, but the action was captured on 16mm film by Sgt. Bill Genaust, a marine cameraman.


First flag raised on Mt Suribachi. Picture by s/sgt Louis Lowery.
Click the image to open in full size.
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Old November 22nd, 2012, 05:36 AM   #106
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Napoleon being a small man. Yes for current standards, but at that time he had the average height.

Click the image to open in full size.
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Old November 22nd, 2012, 10:51 AM   #107

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Originally Posted by Ancientgeezer View Post
I am afraid that you have got yourself totally mixed up.
You can check your facts here Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The iconic flag raising was the SECOND flag raising of the day. The supression of the first flag raising photographs by Lowery has been a matter of contention and has led to the accusations of the staging of the second raising by Rosenthal.
There was no such thing as video in 1945, but the action was captured on 16mm film by Sgt. Bill Genaust, a marine cameraman.


First flag raised on Mt Suribachi. Picture by s/sgt Louis Lowery.
I was aware that the more famous flag raising that was captured in Rosenthal's photograph was the second, and that the flag from Rosenthal's photograph was simply replacing the first flag, which was smaller. In fact there was another photograph taken with both the first flag that had been taken down and the second flag being raised in the same shot.

The myth however had little connection to the order in which the flags were raised, as the general American public (and many in the media) had no idea that there was more than one flag raising. It was assumed that Rosenthal's photograph was staged because of a misunderstanding of a quote he made to other reporters before he had seen his photograph, and because the positions he captured the Marines in seemed far too dramatic to have just been captured by pure dumb luck.
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Old November 22nd, 2012, 11:11 AM   #108

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That the RAF destroyed the Luftwarfe during the battle of Britain.
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Old November 22nd, 2012, 02:26 PM   #109
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Napoleon being a small man. Yes for current standards, but at that time he had the average height.
I believe part of this misconception is Napoleon's own fault. From what I have read his personal guard were all very tall. So by comparison to hs personal guard, he looked very short indeed, especially from far away or if there were paintings of him next to his guard.
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Old November 22nd, 2012, 05:02 PM   #110

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That the RAF destroyed the Luftwarfe during the battle of Britain.
Another is that if the UK had lost the battle of Britain, that short of Britain throwing in the towel, it would have been invaded by Nazi Germany.

Operation Sea Lion from the start was a complete and utter farce. Germany did not possess the ability to wrest control of the seas away from the Royal Navy, all but dooming any attempt at invading Britain, even *if* Germany possessed enough to troop transports and mercant ships to successfully transport and support an invasion. And it didn't.

Had Operation Sea Lion actually been launched it would have benefited the Allies, as Germany would have been crushed at sea and on the beaches. It would have been a military disaster.

Last edited by Scaeva; November 22nd, 2012 at 05:10 PM.
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