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Old July 27th, 2014, 05:36 PM   #21
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Ancientgeezer--My old amigo. -When I first read ''OUR ARMY AT WAR'' in the early 1950's the ''Sergeant Rock ''character did not figure in this comic title-that came later .
Also another 10 cents comic that I read -when available-was ''GI. Combat'' which started with various war stories before switching in around 1955 to stories featuring a Sherman tank crew who were protected and guided in combat by a ghostly vision of Confederate cavalry leader, JEB Stuart, on horseback.
Even sillier was the character in the British produced 'Wizard'' comic where a Brtish tank commander 'Sergeant Blake'' extricated himself and his tank crew from numerous scrapes with the Nazis by showing thm a book containg the rules of cricket published upside down in Portugese.Before Sgt Blake came on the scene around 1954 ''The Wizard'' featured Von Reich and the ''Deathless Men '' .
''The Deathless Men'' were all escapees from Nazi concentration camps who bore the scars of their torture but they all wore grey felt hats;grey felt masks and and crepe grey shoes and they went around vigilante like bumping off sadistic Nazis. VON REICH THEiR SECRET LEADER WAS A BIGWIG N THE NAZI PARTY HIERARCHY who covered their tracks.
But my favourite was Bomber Command ace pilot Sgt Matt Braddock V.C. whose great exploits were described by his faithful navigator George BOURNE who was a kind of Boswell figure to Braddock's DR Johnson..
''I FLEW WITH BRADDOCK'' appeared weekly in ''The Rover'' COMIC which we eagerly awaited arriving at our newsagents every Thursday.price three pence.
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Old July 28th, 2014, 04:40 AM   #22

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Ah! What nostaligia. I remember "Braddock" well. We were also Eagle, Lion and Tiger types at our house, so we got:-

Wing Commander Robert Hereward "Battler" Britton

Click the image to open in full size.

Squadron leader Paddy Payne

Click the image to open in full size.

and a British equivalent to the American "Sgt.Rock", but ours was a full Captain--Captain Dan "Rocky" Rock who led a team of LRDG desperados who defeated the Afrika Corps single-handedly--can't find a graphic though, but I recall he was built like the Incredible Hulk.

It seems that, thanks to comic book publishers, WW2 was kept going at least into the 1970s. I wonder if there was an export market to Germany?
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Old July 28th, 2014, 05:04 AM   #23

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ancientgeezer View Post
It seems that, thanks to comic book publishers, WW2 was kept going at least into the 1970s. I wonder if there was an export market to Germany?
Click the image to open in full size.

It seems Warlord kept going until 1986
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Old July 28th, 2014, 05:43 AM   #24

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The Classics Illustrated series which used comic books to introduce children to classic novels;

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Old July 28th, 2014, 11:20 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by okamido View Post
It was all the EC comics that set off the furor.
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2,000 years ago, the parents were all aghast over new fangled philosophies that the kids were learning, and 1,000 years ago, parents were freaking out about that violent 'chess' game, that everyone was into.

Each time period/ generation has its own "boogey men" that corrupt the children.
Some time ago there was a thread here about the effect of pornography. In 1950 the same question was asked about comic books. 1948 a dr. F. Wertham wrote his book "the seduction of the innocent that said that comic books were a cause of the sudden jump in juvenile crime. In the mid 1940s comic books became popular. a million a year were being sold . Comic as dectect crime had covers of decapitation of women wearing skimpy dresses and drawn in vivid colors. Sen. e. Kafauver had an Senate investigation of the effect of comic books. The industry was forced to develop a Code that included these statements.
General standards—Part A

(1) Crimes shall never be presented in such a way as to create sympathy for the criminal, to promote distrust of the forces of law and justice, or to inspire others with a desire to imitate criminals.

(2) No comics shall explicitly present the unique details and methods of a crime.

(3) Policemen, judges, Government officials and respected institutions shall never be presented in such a way as to create disrespect for established authority.

(4) If crime is depicted it shall be as a sordid and unpleasant activity.

(5) Criminals shall not be presented so as to be rendered glamorous or to occupy a position which creates a desire for emulation.

(6) In every instance good shall triumph over evil and the criminal punished for his misdeeds.

(7) Scenes of excessive violence shall be prohibited. Scenes of brutal torture, excessive and unnecessary knife and gun play, physical agony, gory and gruesome crime shall be eliminated.

Costumes: nudity in any form is prohibited, as is indecent or undue exposure.

(9) Suggestive and salacious illustration or suggestive posture is unacceptable.

(10) All characters shall be depicted in dress reasonably acceptable to society.

(11) Females shall be drawn realistically without exaggeration of any physical qualities
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Old July 28th, 2014, 11:21 AM   #26
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Good post Tricearatops!-I read quite a few of the classics first in the classics American comic series but we had our own British Classics comics .That's where I first read ''Macbeth'' and Dickens ''Barnaby Rudge'
From that British classics rendering of ''BaranabyRudge'' I first learned of the 18th century anti-Roman Catholic ''Gordon Riots''-not in a history text book..
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Old July 30th, 2014, 05:25 AM   #27

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And the two greats from DC Thomson, the Beezer and the Topper.

This is from the Beezer;

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Old July 30th, 2014, 06:06 AM   #28

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Aaah comic books, although I was a 90s child I was an avid fan of the Beano and Asterix. Asterix was where I first learnt things about Roman legionnaires, Caesar, druids and Gaul.

Unfortunately the Beano has been hit by the PC brigade. Dennis the Menace no longer goes around with a catapult and peashooter as they're seen as violent weapons and he can't bully Walter the softy anymore cos that's encouraging social violence.

My uncle used to read the Eagle with Dan Dare, I wonder if that's still going?

Curiously comics nowadays are almost universally Japanese Anime style, personally I can't stand that sort of art work with the wide-eyed school girls, I much prefer western styled art. My favourite is probably the Asterix artwork comics by Hodder & Stoughton/Goscinny & Uderzo, I also used to have one by them called Two-Scalp about a British redcoat and a Native American during the American Indian War, it may have gone some way to encouraging my interest in History.

It's worth mentioning that comics may trace their way back to the ghastly little short stories, the 'Penny Dreadful' during the Victorian era. They also had overly patriotic ones too.

[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penny_dreadful]Penny dreadful - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
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Old July 30th, 2014, 06:06 AM   #29

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Aaah comic books, although I was a 90s child I was an avid fan of the Beano and Asterix. Asterix was where I first learnt things about Roman legionnaires, Caesar, druids and Gaul.

Unfortunately the Beano has been hit by the PC brigade. Dennis the Menace no longer goes around with a catapult and peashooter as they're seen as violent weapons and he can't bully Walter the softy anymore cos that's encouraging social violence.

My uncle used to read the Eagle with Dan Dare, I wonder if that's still going?

Curiously comics nowadays are almost universally Japanese Anime style, personally I can't stand that sort of art work with the wide-eyed school girls, I much prefer western styled art. My favourite is probably the Asterix artwork comics by Hodder & Stoughton/Goscinny & Uderzo, I also used to have one by them called Two-Scalp about a British redcoat and a Native American during the American Indian War, it may have gone some way to encouraging my interest in History.

It's worth mentioning that comics may trace their way back to the ghastly little short stories, the 'Penny Dreadful' during the Victorian era. They also had overly patriotic ones too.

[ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penny_dreadful]Penny dreadful - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]
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Old July 30th, 2014, 07:09 AM   #30

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl_of_Rochester View Post
My uncle used to read the Eagle with Dan Dare, I wonder if that's still going?
Dan Dare seemed to have received an American-Style upgrade in the 1970s. He certainly didn't get muscles like that on 1950s National health orange juice and free milk.


1950s

Click the image to open in full size.

1970s

Click the image to open in full size.

Looks a bit poufy in the 1980s

Click the image to open in full size.

Richard Branson bought the Dan dare rights in 2006 and his artists produced this.

The latest (2010) Dan Dare--I wouldn't recognise him!

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