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Old August 13th, 2014, 03:09 PM   #51

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But if he was a soldier and he was short for a solider, could he not still have developed an inferiority complex over it, theoretically? I'm not saying he did have an inferiority complex, I don't know enough about him to know whether he did or not, but I'm just saying that I can see how a soldier's height was judged against other soldiers and how this could be the basis of the whole "Napoleon Complex" idea. Especially when soldiers are no strangers to bullying.
His inferiority complex was developed when he was a child. Although he came from a line of nobles, his family was very impoverished, and at school, a lot of his peers harassed him. He wasn't just bullied in the army; he had a rough upbringing.
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Old August 13th, 2014, 03:17 PM   #52

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Ninjas are Japanese warriors/fighters with cool (and probably black/dark-colored) outfits.

That's pretty much all I know about ninjas without any additional research. Yes, I know, ignorant me.
Ninjas were Japanese spies and sometimes assassins. They disguised themselves as ordinary people and never wore the black outfits.
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Old August 13th, 2014, 03:23 PM   #53
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Tall Vikings. Skeletal examinations across what was then the Scandinavian world (i.e. including England and northern Scotland) have shown they averaged out at around 5'8 or 5'9, the same as other European peoples or a bit shorter.
Do skeletons not shrink with age?
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Old August 13th, 2014, 03:27 PM   #54

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His inferiority complex was developed when he was a child. Although he came from a line of nobles, his family was very impoverished, and at school, a lot of his peers harassed him. He wasn't just bullied in the army; he had a rough upbringing.
I'm not surprised but I was just speaking hypothetically, that a soldier could develop an inferior complex from being significantly shorter than his fellow soldiers, especially if harassed about it, regardless of whether he height is actually average within normal society.
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Old August 13th, 2014, 03:49 PM   #55

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The claim that Nazi Germany was defeated primarily because of USA's contribution to the war.
Or that the Soviet Union won the Second World War, ignoring that the Second World War also includes the Asia-Pacific theater, where about 32,000,000 people died, making it one of the bloodiest conflicts of all time even were not part of the Second World War. Beyond the border conflict at Khalkin Gol, the Soviets only played an active part in the last few weeks.

Last edited by Scaeva; August 13th, 2014 at 03:51 PM.
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Old August 13th, 2014, 03:55 PM   #56
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Or that the Soviet Union won the Second World War, ignoring that the Second World War also includes the Asia-Pacific theater, where about 32,000,000 people died, making it one of the bloodiest conflicts of all time even were not part of the Second World War. Beyond the border conflict at Khalkin Gol, the Soviets only played an active part in the last few weeks.
But those "last few weeks" were rather important. The Soviet entry in the Asia-Pacific part of the war played a significant--perhaps even decisive--role in Japan's decision to surrender when it did.
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Old August 13th, 2014, 04:12 PM   #57

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Napoleon's height was a product of British (and Royalist propaganda), he was portrayed as a pipsqueak upstart almost form the start.
Although American Presidents are chosen for their height rather than their abilities or intellect, Napoleon's exact contemporary, James Madison was 5' 4" and Horatio Nelson was 5' 6". Judging by his uniforms still on display the Duke of Wellington was about 5' 8", an inch more than Nappy and he was portrayed as a tall man in his day.

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Old August 13th, 2014, 05:05 PM   #58

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But those "last few weeks" were rather important. The Soviet entry in the Asia-Pacific part of the war played a significant--perhaps even decisive--role in Japan's decision to surrender when it did.

When the Soviets crossed into Manchuria Japan's navy had already been destroyed, it's army and naval aviation bled white, many of its best combat formations had been annihilated or rotated back to the Japanese home islands, it had suffered millions of casualties, its cities and industry were being reduced to ash and rubble in massive air raids, the economy was teetering on collapse, and ships bringing oil, troops, weapons, and ammunition to and from Japan and the Asian mainland, had to run a gauntlet between American submarine and air attacks.

To say that the Soviets played the decisive role in the Pacific theater would be quite a stretch, particularly considering that Japan was first and foremost a naval power, and that the naval and air forces that were so vital to the success of the Japanese Empire had already been effectively destroyed. Those naval and air forces had largely been bled white by the United States, with Britain and the Commonwealth nations playing a lesser but significant role. Additionally millions of tons of Japanese merchant shipping had been sent to the bottom, having devastating effects (along with the air raids) on the Japanese economy, and helping to degrade the combat effectiveness of combat formations still posted on the Asian mainland.

At best the Soviet contribution was in making Japan's position more hopeless than it already was, and along with the atomic bombings in bringing a swifter conclusion. It was not decisive however in determining that theater's outcome. Japan had already lost the war, and the unconditional surrender on September 2nd merely spared Japan the horrors of invasion and conquest.

Of all the major powers that fought Japan the Soviets played the smallest role, behind (in ascending order) China, the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth nations, and the United States.

Last edited by Scaeva; August 13th, 2014 at 05:08 PM.
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Old August 13th, 2014, 05:08 PM   #59

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merely spared Japan the horrors of invasion and conquest.
Or possibly the horrors of getting nuked even more times than it actually was.
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Old August 13th, 2014, 05:24 PM   #60
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To say that the Soviets played the decisive role in the Pacific theater would be quite a stretch
You're setting up a straw man here. I didn't say that the Soviet contribution to the outcome of the Asia/Pacific theater was decisive. Japan would have eventually surrendered regardless. I said that it's role in Japan surrendering when it did may well have indeed been decisive. And considering the large number of additional casualties many believed (and continue to believe today) would have resulted if the war in Asia and the Pacific had gone on significantly longer, this is no small thing, and not something to downplay and treat as insignificant.
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