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Old November 21st, 2012, 12:19 AM   #11

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Thanks for all the help.
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Old November 21st, 2012, 10:19 AM   #12

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mandate of Heaven View Post
A very brutal (the very fact the brutality is very realistic and likely made the book that much more brutal) book.
Brutal? The book basically descibes a sunday afternoon picnic.
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Old December 7th, 2012, 09:34 AM   #13
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Killer of Men by Christian Cameron
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Old December 7th, 2012, 03:13 PM   #14

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Well this is the only Greek historical fiction I've read, found it somewhat enjoyable.

The Lost Army: Amazon.co.uk: Valerio Massimo Manfredi: Books
The Lost Army: Amazon.co.uk: Valerio Massimo Manfredi: Books

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Old January 18th, 2013, 11:00 AM   #15

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You will enjoy Colleen McCullough, she has five or six books written about Ancient Rome, "First man in Rome" (Marius), "October Horse" (Sulla), "Caesar", etc, etc... they end with Caesar's death but then there is also a couple about Marc Anthony and Cleopathra. Not some thrash, very well-written. Details, including insulas and dwellings, food, armament, army habits, she did a great job. She also has own illustrations, of faces, Marius, Caesar, his daughter, etc. For those who do not know her, she is the author of "The Thorn Birds", an internationally acclaimed bestseller, and a real writer, not just someone writing about history.

Mary Renault - pretty good, but I like her Britain-based "the Charioteer" more than her Greek fiction.

Paul Doherty writes interesting mystery historical fiction. His hero, a physician in Alexander the Great's army, is also a detective and solves many murders. Fun!

And of course, some of Agatha Christie's mysteries were based in Ancient Egypt.

And my favorite Maurice Druon, "The Accursed Kings", based in the time of Philip IV le Bel of France, and till the beginning of the Hundred-Years war.
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Old January 21st, 2013, 03:14 PM   #16
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I very much enjoyed Victor Hanson Davis' The End of Sparta .

The professor put a life time of learning and thinking about life in aincient Greece . Not just the combat but the farms the culture, a way of life that was hard but also had meaning.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 10:04 PM   #18
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I heard that the books by Christian Cameron aren't too bad either.

God of War: Christian Cameron: 9781409132677: Amazon.com: Books
God of War: Christian Cameron: 9781409132677: Amazon.com: Books

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Old March 9th, 2013, 10:13 PM   #19

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Mary Renault is perhaps one of the finest authors of historical fiction set in Greece, and she deserves praise for trying to make the "legends" believable (Theseus and Athenians go to Crete to participate in bull-leaping rather than killing the Minotaur, for example). And she unflinchingly engages the mores and culture of Ancient Greece, in all of its raunchy and unsettling glory.

"The Last of the Wine" (1956)--set in Athens during the Peloponnesian War, the narrator is a student of Socrates.
"The King Must Die" (1958)--the story of mythical Theseus up to his father's death.
"The Bull from the Sea" (1962)--the remainder of Theseus's life.
"The Mask of Apollo" (1966)--an actor at the time of Plato and Dionysius the Younger
"Fire from Heaven" (1969)--Alexander the Great from the age of four to his father's death
"The Persian Boy" (1972)--Alexander after the conquest of Persia, told from the perspective of Bagoas
"The Praise Singer" (1978)--about Simonedes of Keos
"Funeral Games" (1981)--the Wars of the Diadochi

Last edited by Wolfpaw; March 9th, 2013 at 10:17 PM.
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Old April 6th, 2013, 11:16 AM   #20

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I love Bernard Cornwell. Great action, adventure author. His Viking series about Uhtred starting with The Last Kingdom and his King Arthur series starting with The Winter King are great reads.

My favorite historical novel about ancient Greece is Whom the Gods Would Destroy by Richard Powell. The title comes from a quote by Euripides, "Whom the gods would destroy, they first make mad." Don't judge the book by its cover. The story brings the Trojan War epic to life. If you enjoyed characters like Achilles, Odysseus and Hector in the movie 'Troy' you haven't seen anything till you've read Powell's book. His version of the characters puts the movie version to shame.

Whom the Gods Would Destroy: richard powell: Amazon.com: Books
Whom the Gods Would Destroy: richard powell: Amazon.com: Books

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