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Crystal Rainbow January 5th, 2013 10:30 AM

Philippa Gregory
 
I have heard that Philippa Gregory was just written a book about Anne Neville, called 'The King Maker's daughter' has anyone read this book?
I have read her other books on the Tudor stories out of the library and they seem romantic historical dramas, and easy enough to read.
I have not read any of her books on Elizabeth Woodville or anything else before the Tudors took the throne. Has anyone read any of them?
Philippa Gregory - Official Website of Best Selling Author

History Chick January 5th, 2013 01:36 PM

No, I read The Other Boleyn Girl and was not hugely impressed. I found her characters rather flat and one dimensional.

The Kingmaker's Daughter has been out since August and is the fourth book in the Cousins' War series.

Crystal Rainbow January 5th, 2013 02:09 PM

That was one of those books that I have read, it was all right and easy to read.
I have not read those books on the Cousin's war yet, I was just wondering if they was any historical inaccuracies in those books.:)

princessX January 5th, 2013 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by History Chick (Post 1309263)
No, I read The Other Boleyn Girl and was not hugely impressed. I found her characters rather flat and one dimensional.

I read this a few years back and can't say that it particularly impressed me either. I'm not sure why I actually read it because I find the Tudors a bore. Also, I read one of her Wideacre books and found it...........weird I suppose (for want of a better word).

Crystal Rainbow January 5th, 2013 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by princessX (Post 1309478)
I read this a few years back and can't say that it particularly impressed me either. I'm not sure why I actually read it because I find the Tudors a bore. Also, I read one of her Wideacre books and found it...........weird I suppose (for want of a better word).

From what I have read about the Tudors, from fact as well as fiction is conflicting. Whatever Philippa Gregory has written about the Plantagenet's and the Yorkist Cause is what I am interested in. Does anyone rate her work in this field.

Thibault January 5th, 2013 11:02 PM

I gather her next book The White Princess (about Elizabeth of York) will say that she and her uncle Richard III were lovers.

She seems to like 'incest' as a story line and it was a plank of her Anne Boleyn novel.

Generally speaking, she is a novelist wishing to sell a lot of books and tries to make them appealing to a wide readership. She is not a historian. Her books are not history books and therefore she tends to be rather 'free' with facts, only choosing what is helpful to her story.

There is nothing wrong with this as long as her readership understand she is writing a story not a true and factual account of historical events.

History Chick January 6th, 2013 02:58 AM

She definitely makes use of the wildest speculations - which, in my opinion, she shouldn't have to do if she could write interesting characters to begin with.

I tried to give her another chance and read the sample of "The White Queen" but it was written in pretense tense, which I find pretentious, and it had all this mystic witch-craft mumbo-jumbo in it that put me off. Again... perhaps if she could write characters with more depth, she wouldn't need to resort to that kind of thing.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thibault (Post 1309777)
I gather her next book The White Princess (about Elizabeth of York) will say that she and her uncle Richard III were lovers.

She seems to like 'incest' as a story line and it was a plank of her Anne Boleyn novel.

Generally speaking, she is a novelist wishing to sell a lot of books and tries to make them appealing to a wide readership. She is not a historian. Her books are not history books and therefore she tends to be rather 'free' with facts, only choosing what is helpful to her story.

There is nothing wrong with this as long as her readership understand she is writing a story not a true and factual account of historical events.

She has actually written (collaborated on) one non-fiction work - The Women of the Cousins' War. But yes, when it comes to her novels, definitely best not to take them as historically accurate.

Interestingly, her non-fiction hasn't gotten the best reviews. It gets an average rating on Amazon of 3.6, which is somewhat low for Amazon. What's funny though is that most of the one star ratings seem to be people who were expecting another novel - some don't even seem to understand that what they read was non-fiction! LOL. Shows how intelligent some of her fans are! But even on Goodreads, where that doesn't seem to be a problem, it only gets 3.56.

Ricardian January 6th, 2013 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crystal Rainbow (Post 1309009)
I have heard that Philippa Gregory was just written a book about Anne Neville, called 'The King Maker's daughter' has anyone read this book?
I have read her other books on the Tudor stories out of the library and they seem romantic historical dramas, and easy enough to read.
I have not read any of her books on Elizabeth Woodville or anything else before the Tudors took the throne. Has anyone read any of them?
Philippa Gregory - Official Website of Best Selling Author


Yes, I did read it, and and it took me an effort to finish. It was the first book by this author, and is very likely the last that I'll ever read. For me it is not Historical Fiction, but fiction that uses history as a background.

I've read lots and lots of Ricardian novels, which do a much better job to figure out what the events might have been.

Have you read any other books about the time?

Crystal Rainbow January 6th, 2013 01:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ricardian (Post 1310311)
Yes, I did read it, and and it took me an effort to finish. It was the first book by this author, and is very likely the last that I'll ever read. For me it is not Historical Fiction, but fiction that uses history as a background.

I've read lots and lots of Ricardian novels, which do a much better job to figure out what the events might have been.

Have you read any other books about the time?

I had read, The Reluctant Queen, by Jean Plaidy. It was years ago when I had read it, and I had enjoyed a lot of her other books. I think she was quite realistic when she had wrote about all those different royal families.

I have heard that Philippa Gregory likes to spice things up about their sex lives, is it true that she has written something about Richard having a affair with Elizabeth of York.
If so then it is indeed rubbish.

Ricardian January 6th, 2013 02:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crystal Rainbow (Post 1310347)
I had read, The Reluctant Queen, by Jean Plaidy. It was years ago when I had read it, and I had enjoyed a lot of her other books. I think she was quite realistic when she had wrote about all those different royal families.

I have heard that Philippa Gregory likes to spice things up about their sex lives, is it true that she has written something about Richard having a affair with Elizabeth of York.
If so then it is indeed rubbish.

I don't remember much sex in this book. Come to think of it, I can't remember anything at all. Must have left a deep impression. :rolleyes:

Plaidy's Reluctant Queen isn't one of my favourites either. I nicknamed it for myself "The Drag Queen" :D, because a) it dragged, and b), the cover of my edition shows an individual which looks very much like a boy in women's clothes.

If you are looking for something from the point of view of Anne Neville,
you could also try Anne O'Brien's Virgin Queen (another of my not-favs :)). Obviously she set out to write romance with historical background, and that's what she did. At times Anne sounds and acts a bit like a modern teenager, but it is quite entertaining, with a bit of sex.

Presently I'm reading The White Queen by Leslie Nickell. It is well written, with a very touching love story. Only setback is that Anne is intensely unhappy, frightened and sickly most of the time.

But, if you haven't read it yet, I recommend highly The Sunne in Spendour by Sharon Kay Penman. A fat volume, meticulously researched, historically accurate, and still in print! I think the vast majority of all Ricardians agree that it the best of all novels, a classic. Have a look at the a'zon reviews... ;-)

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/The-Sunne-In-Splendour-Richard/dp/031237593X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357511215&sr=8-1&keywords=sunne+in+splendour"]The Sunne In Splendour: A Novel of Richard III: Sharon Kay Penman: 9780312375935: Amazon.com: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51WA7F5Je7L.@@AMEPARAM@@51WA7F5Je7L[/ame].

(...and why does the software insist to show the full bookcover? Oh well, never mind.)


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