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Old February 24th, 2015, 04:27 PM   #21

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Originally Posted by Nemowork View Post
Early Sharpe books were good but then they turned into formula and paying the rent.

Thats probably why Cornwell ditched them, the Harlequin/grail quest books were fairly good.

He does suffer from revisitning Sharlpe in all his heroes but hes doing his best.
I enjoyed the early Sharpe books but stopped reading them when he started prequels etc.

His Arthur trilogy was very enjoyable
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Old February 24th, 2015, 05:49 PM   #22

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I enjoyed the early Sharpe books but stopped reading them when he started prequels etc.

His Arthur trilogy was very enjoyable
Yeah, the point is that Sharpe is kind of a 19th century superhero, the trouble is he was kind of shoehorning the later era superhero sharpe into an early timeperiod when he was supposed to be just a normal guy and it didnt work.

Sharpes Trafalgar was ridiculous mainly because he had to find a way to get to a famous battle for marketing purposes but there was no actual reason why he would be there and he basically spent the entire book killing time, twiddling his thumbs and doing very little.

Anything written before 1998 is probably good.

but i have to agree on the Aurthur books.
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Old February 24th, 2015, 10:03 PM   #23

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Check out Christian Cameron, and be entertained.
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Amen. What I said! Cameron is the best writer of historical fiction out there today, for my money.
Christian Cameron is awesome, so I third this. His tyrant series is epic, especially storm of arrows and funeral games.

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Originally Posted by rvsakhadeo View Post
' Death to the French ' is by C.S. Forester, another great writer on the Napoleonic days.
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If you are looking for generally military type, Horatio Hornblower series by CS Forester is a true classic series, and very fun to read. It's what inspired Mr. Cornwell to write his Sharpe series.

If you are looking for general historical fiction, I strongly suggest:

Edward Rutherford's Sarum and The Forest. Two epic collections of historical short stories and novellas involving the descendants of five or fictional families. He begins in say 10,000BC and creates three families, and then each successive story includes the descendants of each of these families dealing within certain time frames and making note of earlier stories.

I also highly prize The Physician, by Noah Gordon, one of a series of a family saga. The Physician follos a young barber-surgeon's apprentice across medieval England and on into Europe, leading him to Isfahan and beyond.

I also enjoy mystery series and there are some great historical ones, Paul Doherty's The Sorrowful Mysteries of Brother Athelstan, the Hugh Corbett medieval mysteries, and the Canterbury Tales of Mystery and Murder, are all very good. They're very much set to a standard formula for mysteries but the ones I've read have each been very good.

If you want to read a fantasy series that has the feel of historical fiction, the Song of Ice and Fire by GRR Martin is very well written
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Don't just read the "Hornblower" stuff - the other Forester stuff is well worth a read - The Gun, The African Queen, Brown on Resolution etc.
For naval battles of the Napoleonic wars, CS Forester is one of the best. Apart from O'Brian and Forester I would strongly recommend Dudley Pope, who's Lord Ramage series is equally as good as the former two (as I love both Forester and Pope, it's hard for me to decide which I prefer more) and most of his novels are based upon real events, some obscure, so it's educational in a sense too.


I also like and recommend Stephen Baxter's "Time's Tapestry" series, which covers a wide range of history and "Roma" by Steven Saylor which is an epic generational story focusing on two Roman families.

Last edited by Mangekyou; February 24th, 2015 at 10:12 PM.
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Old April 13th, 2016, 02:12 PM   #24
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I enjoyed the Fort

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Fort-Novel-Revolutionary-War/dp/0062010875/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1460581861&sr=8-1&keywords=the+fort+bernard+cornwell"]Amazon.com: The Fort: A Novel of the Revolutionary War (9780062010872): Bernard Cornwell: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51tKb6YA7tL.@@AMEPARAM@@51tKb6YA7tL[/ame]

His Saxon books were fun to read but like all series books (sharp) they get old and tired.
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Old April 13th, 2016, 02:39 PM   #25

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I enjoyed the Fort

Amazon.com: The Fort: A Novel of the Revolutionary War (9780062010872): Bernard Cornwell: Books

His Saxon books were fun to read but like all series books (sharp) they get old and tired.
That's interesting, The Fort is one of his lowest rated books.
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Old April 14th, 2016, 05:51 AM   #26

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Steven Pressfield's Gates of Fire is brilliant (the only book I think I've ever read more than twice... about four or five times):

[ame="http://www.amazon.co.uk/Gates-Of-Fire-Battle-Thermopylae/dp/0553812165"]Gates Of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae: Amazon.co.uk: Steven Pressfield: 9780553812169: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51R1335GKWL.@@AMEPARAM@@51R1335GKWL[/ame]
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Old April 14th, 2016, 06:20 AM   #27

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Just don't read his Waterloo. Too biased, he obviously dislikes the Dutch-Belgians and openly hates the Prince of Orange. The book reads well, but his views in it are almost as old as the battle and outdated. I don't know how his other works are, I see he wrote a lot of different stuff, but he sure isn't my cup of tea. I didn't know it when I bought the book (Waterloo), but when I learned that it's the guy who wrote Sharpe ...
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Old April 14th, 2016, 09:14 AM   #28
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I see he wrote a lot of different stuff, but he sure isn't my cup of tea.
Me neither. I know he's quite popular, but does anyone else think he sometimes gets a bit too over the top with the sex/violence? I'm all for authenticity in historical fiction, and his books tend to be set in harsh times, but sometimes it just feels like he overdoes it a bit for shock value.

In one of his books (title I can't remember, it was just a year like 13-hundred something) there's a scene where a woman is getting interrogated and her shirt gets ripped, which is followed by a couple lines of meaningless dialogue from some goon in the background remarking how he likes t**s. Completely pointless bit of writing that just broke the suspense of the scene. I think he throws in stuff like that a bit too often, and rather than making it feel more authentic it just makes you roll your eyes and want to skip through.

Last edited by Wodz Mikolaj; April 14th, 2016 at 09:17 AM.
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Old April 14th, 2016, 10:29 AM   #29
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Griff Hosker is worth trying - his Dragonheart series is Viking orientated, his Anarchy series are set, literally, in the anarchy between Stephen and Maud/Matilda and the years leading up to it.
Mike
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Old April 16th, 2016, 05:32 AM   #30
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Griff Hosker is worth trying - his Dragonheart series is Viking orientated, his Anarchy series are set, literally, in the anarchy between Stephen and Maud/Matilda and the years leading up to it.
Mike
Just finished reading the viking series, a fun easy read between real history books. I think Cornwell intertwines a bit more real history. I also like his WW2 books.

Last edited by yakmatt; April 16th, 2016 at 05:38 AM.
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