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Old December 19th, 2010, 03:14 PM   #11

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Re: Shelley, Frankenstein


Pedro, wonderful stuff!

I had to read Frankenstein in high school and it was one of the few books that I had as an assignment that I actually enjoyed.

All that I can contribute is a clip from the Young Frankenstein by Mel Brooks.

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pu1DMSqTLyk&feature=related"]YouTube - do not open this door![/ame]
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Old December 20th, 2010, 10:42 AM   #12

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Re: Shelley, Frankenstein


This is a pretty interesting one. From 1910 made by Edison film a very early Frankenstein film. Interestingly even though it's fixed camera and there seems to be only on camera angle as well as the fact that it's everything you'd expect from a 1910 picture it shows a surprising amount of cinematographic saavy, see the use of the mirror in later scenes.
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Old December 20th, 2010, 10:54 AM   #13

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Re: Shelley, Frankenstein


THE FIRST FRANKENSTEIN MOVIE

This is the introduction to the Wiki article
Frankenstein is a 1910 film made by Edison Studios that was written and directed by J. Searle Dawley. It was the first motion picture adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. The unbilled cast included Augustus Phillips as Dr. Frankenstein, Charles Ogle as the Monster, and Mary Fuller as the doctor's fiancée.
Shot in three days, it was filmed at the Edison Studios in the Bronx, New York City. Although some sources credit Thomas Edison as the producer, he in fact played no direct part in the activities of the motion picture company that bore his name.

For the rest of the article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankenstein_%281910_film%29


[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcLxsOJK9bs"]YouTube - Frankenstein (1910) - Full Movie[/ame]


Thanks for pointing that out. No film buff should be with out this one.

Cicero: I love that movie. Never thought to check out YouTube. I never know what to make of Brooks but that film always has me rolling in the aisle.

Last edited by Pedro; January 2nd, 2011 at 05:33 PM.
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Old December 20th, 2010, 10:57 AM   #14

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Re: Shelley, Frankenstein


oooh yer i forgot to add the link to the Edison video, thanks for picking up my slack Pedro. Also forgot to comment on the book, which I shall do in due course.
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Old December 20th, 2010, 06:37 PM   #15

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Re: Shelley, Frankenstein


There's' also an interesting book by Peter Ackroyd:

"The Casebook Of Victor Frankenstein" (2008) Out of print I think. Should be available at a decent library.
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Old December 20th, 2010, 08:58 PM   #16

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Re: Shelley, Frankenstein


Quote:
Originally Posted by Cicero View Post
I had to read Frankenstein in high school
I read it in college.
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Old December 20th, 2010, 09:27 PM   #17

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Re: Shelley, Frankenstein


Read it in a USO library in Thailand.
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Old December 21st, 2010, 04:55 AM   #18
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Re: Shelley, Frankenstein


Wow. Pedro, that's great. This must be the most eloquent introduction in the history of book discussions on the internet!

I had been a Frankenstein virgin up until this point , hadn't even watched the movie, so a lot of what you wrote back there has helped me understand the context well.

As far as the book itself is concerned, my mind's not yet made up about it. I'm very ambivalent about the treatment of the topic. A lot of it is highly unsatisfactory, and language pretty pedestrian by the standards of the day. But it does raise quite a number of moral dilemmas and I guess where the book really scores is that there are no clear cut answers.

"The monsters acquisition of language is one of the most interesting scenes in the book."

It's also the most unconvincing part of the story, second only to his conception. There isn't much of a difference between the hero and the villain here so to call one a "monster" and the other his victim is very unjust. They are both each other's victims, they both did monstrous things to each other, and they both brought each other's downfall. I also think the least Frankenstein could have done is give his creation a name. To dismiss him as a "wretch" or a "daemon" is very very callous. We all know what happened the last time a Creator disowned his creation.
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Old December 21st, 2010, 06:19 AM   #19

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Re: Shelley, Frankenstein


Quote:
Originally Posted by tjadams View Post
I read it in college.
Did you like it? What did you think?

Did Thomas Jefferson ever read the novel? Since he died in 1826 it is possible. Putting him and the novel together is a challenge I’ll leave to T.J. However here is one link (tenuous) to an event that I would like to have attended.

Here is the headline and the lead paragraph from the University newsletter:

Frankenstein Exhibition Opens April 27 in University of Virginia's Rotunda

April 25, 2008 — Frankenstein's monster may not be the first thing that comes to mind when one thinks about Thomas Jefferson's Rotunda at the University of Virginia.

You'll have an opportunity to change your thinking starting Sunday, April 27, with the opening of a new exhibition in the Dome Room of the Rotunda called "The Monster Among Us: 'Frankenstein' from Mary Shelley to Mel Brooks." The exhibition traces the evolution of the novel from its anonymous London publication in 1818 to its present position as a symbol of the potential — and dangers — of modern science.


The rest of the story of the exhibit is here:
http://www.virginia.edu/uvatoday/new...se.php?id=5019
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Old March 14th, 2011, 01:45 PM   #20
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Just came across this interesting article about Frankenstein:

Quote:
Frankenstein: 10 possible meanings

...Nearly 200 years after that sunless summer, the novel is considered a landmark work and every decade brings a new interpretation. Here is a selection - some include plot details.

1. Science can go too far.

2. Actions have consequences.

3. Don't play God.

4. A warning about freed slaves.

5. Shelley's maternal guilt.

6. Post-natal depression.

"It was on a dreary night of November, that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils... It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs. How can I describe my emotions at this catastrophe, or how delineate the wretch whom with such infinite pains and care I had endeavoured to form?" (Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Chapter five)"

7. Monsters are not born monsters.

8. Differences should be celebrated.

9. Viva la revolution.

Frankenstein's creature has been interpreted as symbolic of the revolutionary thought which had swept through Europe in the 1790s, but had largely petered out by the time Shelley wrote the novel.

Critics said the creature's failure to prosper and the havoc unleashed was evidence that Shelley was anti-revolution, unlike her radical parents and husband, and supportive of the old order.

10. Christian allegory.
BBC News - Frankenstein: 10 possible meanings
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