Historum - History Forums  

Go Back   Historum - History Forums > Themes in History > History Book Reviews > Historum Book Discussion
Register Forums Blogs Social Groups Mark Forums Read

Historum Book Discussion History Book Discussion Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old January 20th, 2013, 02:11 PM   #21
Lecturer
 
Joined: Sep 2011
Posts: 412
Nausea


Quote:
Originally Posted by BRIAN GOWER View Post
Anyone who has taken LSD can easily relate to Nausea.
Not worth the effort eh ? You know thats advice I will take, haven't read The Rebel in years .
McGrunt is offline  
Remove Ads
Old January 20th, 2013, 02:23 PM   #22
Suspended indefinitely
 
Joined: Feb 2008
From: trapped inside a hominid skull
Posts: 6,041

What I got from "Nausea " is that existence precedes essense. When Roquentin experiences reality without the catagories of predicates,universals,reality is seen as a mush that creates nausea. In many ways similar to vertigo. I think of it as premature enlightenment (all is one,etc).
wittgenstein is offline  
Old January 20th, 2013, 10:31 PM   #23

BRIAN GOWER's Avatar
Glo Caled
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Gwendraeth Valley, Carmarthenshire, Wales.
Posts: 2,848

Quote:
Originally Posted by McGrunt View Post
Not worth the effort eh ? You know thats advice I will take, haven't read The Rebel in years .
I still think it's worth reading just for the perspective.
BRIAN GOWER is offline  
Old January 20th, 2013, 10:32 PM   #24

BRIAN GOWER's Avatar
Glo Caled
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Gwendraeth Valley, Carmarthenshire, Wales.
Posts: 2,848

Quote:
Originally Posted by wittgenstein View Post
What I got from "Nausea " is that existence precedes essense. When Roquentin experiences reality without the catagories of predicates,universals,reality is seen as a mush that creates nausea. In many ways similar to vertigo. I think of it as premature enlightenment (all is one,etc).
Sums it up perfectly.
BRIAN GOWER is offline  
Old January 21st, 2013, 12:16 AM   #25

Sicknero's Avatar
Historian
 
Joined: May 2012
From: Here to Eternity
Posts: 4,382

Never got around to reading this, just downloading it now. I quite like Satre's idea of bad faith and existentialism as a reaction to absolute idealism.
Sicknero is offline  
Old February 1st, 2013, 08:40 AM   #26

Patito de Hule's Avatar
Quack
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 3,319
Blog Entries: 9

Quote:
Originally Posted by BRIAN GOWER View Post
I still think it's worth reading just for the perspective.
When I read, it is often to try to understand the author's perspective. I got more out of reading Camus' critique of the novel than the novel itself, and have paraphrased his first two sentences many times in critiquing a novel that overdoes the "lecturing."

Quote:
A novel is never anything but a philosophy expressed in images. And in a good novel the philosophy has disappeared into the images. But the philosophy need only spill over into the characters and action for it to stick out like a sore thumb, the plot to lose its authenticity, and the novel its life.
Patito de Hule is offline  
Old February 1st, 2013, 09:29 AM   #27

BRIAN GOWER's Avatar
Glo Caled
 
Joined: Oct 2011
From: Gwendraeth Valley, Carmarthenshire, Wales.
Posts: 2,848

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patito de Hule View Post
When I read, it is often to try to understand the author's perspective. I got more out of reading Camus' critique of the novel than the novel itself, and have paraphrased his first two sentences many times in critiquing a novel that overdoes the "lecturing."
Thank you: Yes...I see what you are saying but Sartre, for me, is convincing in conveying the awful strangeness of existence. LSD does help to understand Nausea but not recommended even for philosophical let alone mystical insight.
BRIAN GOWER is offline  
Old February 1st, 2013, 10:04 AM   #28
Lecturer
 
Joined: Jan 2013
From: Minas Tirith
Posts: 300

You could always switch over to Friedrich Nietzsche
DS1967 is offline  
Old February 1st, 2013, 10:33 AM   #29

Patito de Hule's Avatar
Quack
 
Joined: Jan 2009
From: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 3,319
Blog Entries: 9

Yes, Nietzsche is probably better than LSD, but I've never tried either. Nihilism just doesn't do anything for me.

As I recollect, Nietzche enjoyed a resurgence of popularity at the same time as LSD made it's public appearance. He is surely one of the most misquoted (or quoted out of context) philosopher in the canon.

A resurgence of popularity apparently isn't the only thing Nietzsche "enjoyed" since, as I understand, he went mad and died from syphilis.
Patito de Hule is offline  
Old February 1st, 2013, 10:35 AM   #30
Lecturer
 
Joined: Jan 2013
From: Minas Tirith
Posts: 300

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patito de Hule View Post
Yes, Nietzsche is probably better than LSD, but I've never tried either. Nihilism just doesn't do anything for me.

As I recollect, Nietzche enjoyed a resurgence of popularity at the same time as LSD made it's public appearance. He is surely one of the most misquoted (or quoted out of context) philosopher in the canon.

A resurgence of popularity apparently isn't the only thing Nietzsche "enjoyed" since, as I understand, he went mad and died from syphilis.

Yeah the Nazis loved to claim Him
DS1967 is offline  
Reply

  Historum > Themes in History > History Book Reviews > Historum Book Discussion

Tags
nausea, sartre


Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sartre and Nietzsche wittgenstein Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology 0 December 30th, 2009 06:32 PM

Copyright © 2006-2013 Historum. All rights reserved.