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Old June 24th, 2011, 10:46 AM   #1

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Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment


Join us on June 3rd for a discussion on Dostoevsky's,

Crime and Punishment

(hosted by Historum's own, Blacksmit049)

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Old July 3rd, 2011, 08:17 AM   #2

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open sesame!
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Old July 3rd, 2011, 08:44 AM   #3

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i have never read the book but it does certainly look like one of those books that just have to be read in your life, to those who have read it how did you find it. i have heard in review of other books like war and peace that its very overwhelming at first and hard to keep track of whats going on, is it the same thing with this where you might struggle to follow it
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Old July 3rd, 2011, 08:21 PM   #4

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The book of Dostoyevsky was a haunting novel about a man whose dreams of becoming an audacious Napoelon based on his radical and justifiable theory to escape poverty from the 19th century Russia. A fascinating story for the mind, a genre for justification of crime and one of the best books ever published.

Character Introduction:

The book rumbles in the beginning by Dostoyevsky's description of the 19th century condition in St. Petersburg. Here lives a taunting and poor man, he is called Raskolnikov. He was an ex-student in a university and was living under the tutelage of his landlady in an apartment. Raskolnikov was living in a gloomy condition, no food to eat, no other clothes to wear and always weary on his thoughts. The early chapters gave us a brief but mysterious background of Raskolnikoff, his plans were not yet revealed in clarity but nonetheless contempt surrounds his countenance. His family circle composed of his mother and sister which lives in the early part of the story, in a near province. His family communicates by sending letters to Rodion alongside with the money and later will establish a part of novel that will justify his nihilism. Pulcheria, the loving and hopeless mother of Raskolnikov, was an old woman whose weariness always has the cause of worriness in his only son. Dounia, the well-spirited and brave sister, that sincerely helps Raskolnikov in his thoughts and problems encountered. The mother and sister are very compatible since they helped each other and the one will lean on the other as one will have rather a unique weakness than the other. Opposite to this, Raskolnikov could be sometimes nihilistic while the two will always love him unconditionally no matter what happens (Dounia learns that Raskolnikov murdered Alena and Elizabeth)

Alena Ivanovna, an old hag pawnbroker, the target of Raskolnikov's hideous action and the way to escape his present situation, was a woman without consideration on her poor customers. She lives in an old helpless room, where dust lives without limitation and few furniture are there to be displayed. Her sister Elizabeth, a friend of Sonia, and an innocent victim of Raskolnikoff's crime when she slips in killing Alena. Elizabeth was the opposite of Alena, Alena is merciless while Elizabeth was a god-fearing woman, who was a comapanion for Sonia.

Raskolnikov has acquianted with Marmeladoff, a drunk serviceman in the city whose ideals of pleasure and suffering has fascinated Raskolnikov which helped the drunkard to go back to his deplorable cell of apartment where his family lives. His wife, Catherine was a hard-pressing woman, previously of noble birth, but was stuck into poverty because his husband's folly. She always reminisce her glorious past, when she fancies her daughter's clothes or anything she sees that was pretty to her eyes and instincts. Her daughter Sonia was a thin, pale woman whose despair is very overwhelming for such a human character. Her sorrow makes her skin look pale which vividly shows her hunger for food and hope. Her eyes are very deeply dug in unconditional love for her family and the suffering of others. She suffer being a prostitute just for her family to live, she lives in a separate apartment apart from her family. Her characteristic is the opposite of Raskolnikov's presence in many situations which he will realize at the end of the novel.

His friend Razoumikhin was a precarious, loving and intelligent man, a companion of Raskolnikov during his stay and study in the university. Razoumikhin was a polite, faithful and trustworthy friend of Raskolnikov although he refuses all the help he can get from his friend. When Razoumikhin found Raskolnikov in his apartment he immediately helped his friend from his sickness and delirium which supposes to be an opposite for Raskolnikov's thoughts of ignorance for others. Later in the novel, Razoumikhin fell in love with Dounia to which it turns out as a compatible couple.

Pophyrius Petrovich was the weird detective in charged of the investigation in the murder of Alena and Elizabeth. He specializes in an unorthodox type of interrogation which he was famed to do. His first interrogation of Raskolnikov was when two men approach Pophyrius for the item that he loans to Alena. After being obssesively sick about the murder, he became careful of words. He also became weary of Pophyrius suspicion of his crime for he also read an old article written by Raskolnikov during his stay in the university. This event gave us a brief background of "why does he do this?".

The second interrogation was entirely a catastrophic event for Raskolnikov's mind. The events followed show that he spoke something out of consciousness because of Pophyrius psychological tricks in an interview about the murder and other things that he could connect to the hideous crime. The event almost made him a real culprit, not just for the intervention of Nikola who told them that he was a murderer. Surprisingly this was different from his view, but nonetheless he saved himself.

The third interrogation is the final and the most remembered events in the story. It is an event where Raskolnikov was actually called a murderer with proofs and basis, and there lies an agreement that he should admit his crimes. It was the very climax of the story, where redemption, punishment and resurrection would occur deep in his thoughts, a very statement of the novel until the end.

Luzhin, a good lawyer and politician, but his folly made him ashamed to everyone in the family of Raskolnikov. A competitor of Razoumikhin and a previous lover of Dounia which has plans for marriage. In the middle Luzhin became very demanding and has an attribute that is very weak, he spoke of consistency and rudeness to other people.(expand further)

Svidrigailov was a destitute man, a pursuer of Dounia while still holding a ring to Petrovna. Raskolnikov and Svidrigailov are very the same in terms of desire(escaping something) and work to charity(giving money to others) but the difference was the ending. Svidrigailov commits suicide, while Raskolnikov went and confess his crime. Although the novel doesn't tell us whether he kills his wife, but it is rather obvious that when Raskolnikov enter his apartment, the reader could tell that two has the same spirit of crime in their hands. Svidrigailov also confront Dounia in St. Petersburg, after attempting to convince Dounia to kill him or loving him.
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Old July 3rd, 2011, 08:34 PM   #5

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Raskolnikov had a dream while in sleep. His childhood dream about a horse (mare) that was tortured and eventually killed during a people's rage against it. The dream was actually cost a chapter in a book so I think that the dream is very significant to the actual killing. Elizabeth was the mare in the dream (if I remember it correctly, somewhere I've read it.) she was innocent and also a victim from a kill. She was a victim of selfishness of Raskolnikov to escape his poor life. This apparition to Raskolnikov was very haunting at first because the dream came before the plan, but it was enlightening to the reader after he do the murder.

The death of Elizabeth became a significant factor for Raskolnikov's consciousness and state, because he always feels nervous and fear envelops his nature. So what if Elizabeth didn't showed up in Alena's room when the murder is happening, would Raskolnikov not suffer the volition of fear or would Raskolnikov have no fever at all and escape St. Petersburg with the money attain?
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Old July 3rd, 2011, 08:37 PM   #6

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Quote:
Originally Posted by irishcrusader95 View Post
i have never read the book but it does certainly look like one of those books that just have to be read in your life, to those who have read it how did you find it. i have heard in review of other books like war and peace that its very overwhelming at first and hard to keep track of whats going on, is it the same thing with this where you might struggle to follow it
Very boring at first IMO, but the pacing keeps you reading it. I remember the night I've read 6 or more chapters consecutively (climax of the novel) because it was very entertaining and my curiosity keeps me pushing until I've finished the novel.
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Old July 4th, 2011, 06:30 AM   #7

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Quote:
Originally Posted by blacksmit049 View Post
Very boring at first IMO, but the pacing keeps you reading it. I remember the night I've read 6 or more chapters consecutively (climax of the novel) because it was very entertaining and my curiosity keeps me pushing until I've finished the novel.
thanks, i do hope to read it and many of the other greats some time
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Old July 4th, 2011, 06:55 AM   #8

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Apologies in advance but.......I much preferred The Idiot
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Old July 4th, 2011, 07:00 AM   #9
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blacksmith049,

That's a brilliant write-up. Many thanks for your time and effort. It was a pleasure reading the whole thing especially since so much of it was so different than my perspective. When I say different, I don't really mean different in the understanding of it but in the description of it. You gave me a fresh look into a jaded (to me) story. One can go on and on about this novel but you have captured the essence of the main themes and characters very well. Well done!
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Old July 4th, 2011, 08:03 AM   #10

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosi View Post
blacksmith049,

That's a brilliant write-up. Many thanks for your time and effort. It was a pleasure reading the whole thing especially since so much of it was so different than my perspective. When I say different, I don't really mean different in the understanding of it but in the description of it. You gave me a fresh look into a jaded (to me) story. One can go on and on about this novel but you have captured the essence of the main themes and characters very well. Well done!
Great thanks! I'm currently reading about the author, so I will post about his background on writing the book.

Can you also post your perspective about the characters or any information about the novel? I would gladly read it!
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