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Old May 8th, 2015, 07:19 AM   #21
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Apart from the book...
I've listened to Jeff Wayne's musical version of The War of the Worlds with Richard Burton narrating.
OOOOH--LAAAAAAAA!

nb-
The episode with the Thunder Child was very eerie and powerful, paraphrased: "the ship with a great WHOOOOSH of spray swung about and bears down on the Martians... it cuts one of them down and people begin to cheer..." but then as it closes they other Martian machines close and melt the ship's decks with the death ray... it's described as the loss of hope and very melancholy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Wa..._of_the_Worlds

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Old May 8th, 2015, 07:29 AM   #22

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Here we are Coll;

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-reAahY1GCE[/ame]
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Old May 8th, 2015, 07:38 AM   #23
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Thanks Tri,

I was struggling to copy in any worthwhile link... the second link didn't take it seems!

I bought the book a few years ago when Penguin released his novels as Classics.

I suddenly realised that despite all of the films and that musical I'd never actually read the original.


The Cone
was a favourite Wells short story, I first read it as a child and then polished off every short story he wrote, he was the first serious author I probasbly read and I thought his imagination was brilliant, unique and kind of... and made a devastating impression.

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Old May 8th, 2015, 07:45 AM   #24
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I both read it and listened to it last year in the original. I think it holds up very well! It has a modern feel in some ways.

It is well worth reading because it has so many modern treatments and spin-offs in movies and fiction. Golly, that moment when Tom Cruise throws a grenade at the tripod to attract its attention so he can get up to where it's holding his daughter --- it whirls and crouches so fast, like a big cat, a panther: very catlike, great film making as you fully see the malevolence of the aliens. I've seen the War of the Worlds movie over and over.
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Old May 11th, 2015, 04:33 AM   #25

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Collingwood View Post
Thanks Tri,

The Cone was a favourite Wells short story, I first read it as a child and then polished off every short story he wrote, he was the first serious author I probasbly read and I thought his imagination was brilliant, unique and kind of... and made a devastating impression.
Coll, there is a short story by Wells called The Crystal Egg, which is a sort of prequel to WOTW.

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I've seen the War of the Worlds movie over and over.
I enjoy it as well, Phebe It has a few gripping scenes, like Tim Robbins losing his mind when he realises the aliens are using humans as fertiliser for the Red Weed, in a sort of reverse terra-forming.
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Old May 11th, 2015, 05:45 AM   #26
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I remember the title of The Crystal Egg and The Argonauts of the Air amongst many others.

The Cone may have dated, now, but that story is still very powerful I suspect, the man of indusry, a smelting works manager, who takes his wife's lover for a tour or tense stroll to view the foundry site he oversees... and a special experience, the cone of the title awaits. It's a sort of massive iron plug dropped into a the top of a blast furnace to seal it up, they can lower and raise the cones, the surface temperature of the cone reaches thousands of degrees, an extremely high temperatures and glows orange.

The site manager or husband/foreman describes how you can see intense effects of light and magic at night as gases escape from around the cone's edge, the rainbow colours of hot gases... a cone is used so that they can syphon off escaping gases that would be lost otherwise.

I won't include a spoiler as to the true and ominous significance of the cone .... but there is contrast I think that Wells uses here in what must be one of his small masterpieces, the wife's lover is an educated gentlemen and the husband, described by the lovers as a foundry brute. At one point and when discussing whether he knows they are having an affiar, but for whom the colours and sound of the foundry are poetic, so even without an education he appreciates the beauty of these industrial processes and it his domain.

Wells seems to do the polar opposite of William Blake, he sees the beauty through this character, the foreman, in the industrial revolution. Not just the slag and soot and dirt and scorched land around the site of the blast furnaces and smelting works but the poetry of the processes and colours.

By chance because of where I live, the industrial revolution, well... began here so we'd already been on school trips to heritage smelting works and old industrial sites, so that imagery was already familiar i suppose, ideal before a childhood read.
Never really thought about that aspect before, if I was from the south of England, then maybe that would be less familiar.

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Old May 11th, 2015, 06:08 AM   #27

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I'll need to read The Cone. I have read it in the past, but so long ago I've forgotten what happens.

My own personal favourite of Wells short stories is The Sea Raiders, once again the hostile life-forms are cephalopods, not unlike WOTW.

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Old May 11th, 2015, 06:18 AM   #28
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I think I remember it because it was the first childhood classic I read and was thriilled by, not a childhood story, just part of my first serious reading if you follow, my father was very into H G Wells, and so described it to me with glee.

BTW: I didn't really then go on to read general SF like a lot of kdis do, but recently I've enjoyed some of the SF Masterworks reprinted classics series, I recently grabbed a copy of Brian Aldiss' Heliconia, from the library, but it's very selective, my SF reading,

H G Wells is in a different class, I see him as more literary-SF, so he's very special in that sense. A one off.
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Old May 12th, 2015, 05:11 AM   #29

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Read "The Cone" last night, and then "The Purple Pileus" as a complete contrast.

.................................................. ......................................

Back to WOTW.

Wells' novel is part of type of story called by the French Guerre Imaginaire, which was very popular in the late 19th/early 20th centuries (still is, going by the books of Dale Brown and Harold Coyle) which featured a variety of war stories involving various combinations of Britain, France, Germany Russia and the USA pitted against each other. The first in this field, Chesney's Battle of Dorking dates from 1871 and has much the same territory getting a going over as WOTW except this time the invaders are Germans.
Wells would later write The War in the Air and The World Set Free, which would feature atomic weapons.

WOTW has remained in print since it first appeared, while the great majority of those works by other authors have been forgotten.

Nothing can match a Martian invasion;

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Old May 12th, 2015, 05:47 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Triceratops View Post
Coll, there is a short story by Wells called The Crystal Egg, which is a sort of prequel to WOTW.



I enjoy it as well, Phebe It has a few gripping scenes, like Tim Robbins losing his mind when he realises the aliens are using humans as fertiliser for the Red Weed, in a sort of reverse terra-forming.

Okay, thanx, The Cone, and a WOTW prequel, The Crystal Egg. I have a complete H.G. Wells in my digital library ---- so many of these classics are free now, might as well! I marked those stories.

I just this minute before coming here acquired H.G. Wells' "Danger," because it was a story about submarines causing England to surrender by sinking everything afloat --- written in late 1913, but published in July 1914! It turned out to be accurate in every respect to what actually happened when the war started. Except that England didn't surrender, of course.

Nobody believed the Germans would do any such thing, of course. Just far-fetched sci-fi.

While I was at it I got Wells' Lost World. I have an excuse: the newest Jurassic Park is coming out this summer!! Great excitement here.
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