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Old May 14th, 2016, 02:58 AM   #11

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'The 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica contained almost twice as many articles as the last significant edition before it, but it contained only 15 or 16 percent more words...'

'The first encyclopaedia makers had no doubts concerning their ability to compile their works single-handedly. Cassiodorus, Honorius Inclusus (or Solitarius)...'

'John Harris an English theologian and scientist, may have been one of the first to enlist the aid of experts, such as the naturalist John Ray and Sir Isaac Newton, Technical Lexicon 1704...'

'The French Encyclopédie, the largest encyclopaedia issued at that time, inevitably had many contributors...also Bandini’s Fons memorabilium universi...'

'The problem of the encyclopaedist has always been to strike the right mean between too learned and too simplified an approach. The American editor Franklin H Hooper, undaunted by his own lack of scholarship, took a notable part in ensuring that the articles of the 11th edition of Encyclopædia Britannica were kept within the mental range of the average reader...'

'Gregor Reisch managed to cover the whole university course of the day in his brief Margarita Philosophica, which correctly interpreted the taste of the younger generation at the end of the 15th century...'

'Some of the leading encyclopaedias offered additional services during the second half of the 20th century that provided the reader with the expert guidance necessary to get the best from a modern encyclopaedia’s complex contents...'

'In using a reputable encyclopaedia, the reader is inclined to accept the authenticity of any article he or she happens to read. Subconsciously the reader is aware that the highly organized staff of scholars credited for the work must inevitably have ensured the scrutiny of all material. Nevertheless, over the course of the 20th century, editors of encyclopaedias tended more and more to commission signed articles by well-known experts. For its 1922 supplement, Britannica commissioned articles from some of the most famous men and women of the day...There is in fact a difference in the treatment of a subject written by a politician and by an academic historian of distinction. Each writer has something important to offer, and the results will be very different...'

'Encyclopaedia writing requires teamwork in which each article is edited in relation to others closely connected by subject. If a writer makes a statement that is partly qualified or totally contradicted in another article, the contributions of both writers must be scrutinized by the editorial staff, whose job it is to effect some kind of eventual agreement. Truth can be viewed from many standpoints, and references to any controversy may produce problems demanding all the skill and tact of the editors to resolve, particularly when the reputation of the writer is at stake in a signed article...'

'Throughout the years, most major encyclopaedias have been accused of reflecting bias in one or more of their articles. In the Encyclopédie the lack of neutrality was intentional and apparent. Various editions of Encyclopædia Britannica, almost from the beginning, were accused of bias as well. The practice of relying on outside specialists for articles, a practice now followed by most serious encyclopaedias, has increased the likelihood that bias will be worked into an article. Many critics have felt that the reader is protected in such cases by the fact that the identity of the contributor is not hidden. It has also been argued that the presence of slanted opinions in an article gave to older encyclopaedias a colour and sense of conviction that is lacking in most modern works. Modern editors of major encyclopaedias nevertheless make every effort to eliminate any hint of bias in their products, but the task is a difficult one. For example, an account of the Korean War might vary according to whether it was written by a North or South Korean, a Chinese, or an American writer...'
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Old May 18th, 2016, 06:40 PM   #12
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Woah, I'm very thankful for so many great replies!

I forgot to mention that I'm only looking for an encyclopedia that's available digitally. I want an encyclopedia or "a source of knowledge" I can read on my tablet device.

My question is: Would Britannica's app be the best thing for me?

EDIT:
I don't want something like physical books of an encyclopedia to store in my study.

Last edited by Andy123; May 18th, 2016 at 07:28 PM.
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Old May 18th, 2016, 08:05 PM   #13

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Since childhood, I've always used The Lincoln Library of Essential Information, at least at home. The physical book purchase includes a 1-year license to the online database, providing students with unlimited online access from school or from home, and 20% more content than would fit between the covers. Intended mostly for middle school, high school and college students.

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The Lincoln Library of Essential Information has been a trusted reference work since 1924. Millions of users have relied on its authoritative articles to enrich their knowledge of the world and locate essential facts and figures. Now in its 44th edition, it remains one of the most comprehensive sources of research information for today’s middle school, high school, and college student.

The easiest way to jump start any research project or satisfy personal curiosity, Essential Information eliminates the frustration of being bombarded by thousands of search engines hits. And while its core articles, written by more than 80 world-renowned experts, provide a quick and comprehensive introduction to the subject, they are complemented by carefully-selected sources for further study (web sites, books, periodicals) that help point the way to more in-depth study.
I have my grandfather's 1935 edition in my library. This book is like a family tradition, I guess!

https://omnigraphics.com/shop/essent...d/#description
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Old May 18th, 2016, 08:31 PM   #14

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You may find help at ARBAonline in locating the perfect reference works for your purposes: Welcome to ARBAonline

ARBAonline-the most comprehensive, authoritative database for quality reviews of print and electronic reference works-was launched in response to popular demand from library professionals. ARBA = American Reference Books Annual.


ARBAonline Fact Sheet

19,000+ reviews (1400 new each year)
900+ CD-ROMs and Websites reviewed
400+ publishers featured
500+ expert reviewers from the United States and Canada
Resources featured:
8,000 Encyclopedias and Dictionaries
6,000 Handbooks and Guidebooks
3,000 Directories
600 Indexes
400 Almanacs
350 Yearbooks
400 Atlases (geographical, historical)

Subject Areas

General Reference 700+ titles
Social Sciences 7,500+ titles
800+ in Economics and Business
350+ professional resources reviewed for library & information science professionals
Humanities 5,000 titles
1200+ in Literature
1000+ in History
Science and Technology in General 1,900 titles
750+ covering Health and Medicine
400+ covering Physical Sciences and Math

Last edited by Karpivna; May 18th, 2016 at 08:33 PM.
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Old May 18th, 2016, 08:41 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Oda Nobunaga View Post
Wikipedia is the most useful I think but try and check the sources at the bottom of the page to see if it seems to clear out. Or if you can find the source makes sure to check if it is true and if the information cited is within the proper context or interpreted accurately.
Thanks, but it seems like a bad idea for me to gain most of my knowledge so I'm trying to stop using Wikipedia and use an online encyclopedia(like Britannica) that contains information that's been verified.
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Old May 18th, 2016, 10:33 PM   #16

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There is also the very useful World Digital Library hosted by the US government's Library of Congress.

https://www.wdl.org/en/
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Old May 18th, 2016, 11:25 PM   #17
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The most concerning part of finding a new resource to replace Wikipedia was that the new resource's information had been verified as accurate.

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Originally Posted by Karpivna View Post
There is also the very useful World Digital Library hosted by the US government's Library of Congress.

https://www.wdl.org/en/
Wow, this is the first time I've heard of this website. I assume all of the information contained within www.wdl.org/en/ has been verified as being accurate?

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Old May 19th, 2016, 03:09 AM   #18
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Sorry to be posting again, but I forgot to mention that I'm only looking for digital resources of information that contain verified and accurate information that I can read on my PC and not physical books.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Megas Basileus View Post
I hope this helps:
- use multiple encyclopedia's and compare the information you find in each of them.
- check if the lemma is signed by an author. Quickly google the author, in best case he/she is an expert on your topic.
- It is better to use a 'specialized' encyclopedia than a general one. If you're into the crusades for example, use Encyclopedia of the Crusades instead of the Brittanica.
- an extensive bibliography might indicate a better lemma, but this isn't necesarily the case.
I'd LOVE to view a list of encyclopedias or general digital resources that have had their information verified to contain accurate information...!

EDIT: I was just thinking if there was an online community for Britannica that I could have a look at and ask them questions?

Last edited by Andy123; May 19th, 2016 at 04:58 AM.
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Old May 26th, 2016, 06:48 AM   #19
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Any advice from the knowledgeable folks here? I'd be highly thankful!
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