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Old May 19th, 2016, 01:38 AM   #1
BML
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What to read on Islamic History?


I recently decided that I should try to understand Islamic history and its involvement in terrorism but found the books that I bought very disappointing due to blatant bias so I decided to read the reviews before I bought anything else and I came across, "Hagarism: The Making of the Islamic World" Patricia Crow. Although it was written nearly 40 years ago it is offered for sale at around £200.00 which is outside my reach so can anyone suggest the sort of book I should be looking for as I attempt to understand what is a much more complex matter than it first appears?
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Old May 19th, 2016, 02:04 AM   #2

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I am no expert but I quite enjoyed DESTINY DISRUPTED.
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Old May 20th, 2016, 02:06 AM   #3
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After the last terrorists attacks in Europe I thought I should try to understand why they had occurred. To a certain extent I believed that the imposition of the Sykes–Picot Agreement, the Balfour Declaration and any number of other agreements made in the west and imposed upon the Middle East followed by American lead invasions on trumped up charges had alienated the Muslim world but then I considered that this was a simplistic approach.
I opened up a couple of forums on Islamic history but discovered that they were religiously based so I started to look for books that might help my search to find an effective way to look at Islam.
I soon discovered that there is a growing industry in the production of books relating to Islam and terrorism and many of them are suspect when it comes bias and scholarship so I started to look at the reviews before I bought any more books.
“Understanding Islamic Terrorism” Patrick Sookhdeo
Written by an Islamic apostate makes the book for me suspect and one sided.
“The Missing Martyrs” Charles Kurzam. States none are terrorists.
This used a form of logic based on the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims never having committed an act of terror or facilitating a terrorist act. Therefore it must be true that not only are most Muslims peaceful, but almost every Muslim alive bears no direct culpability for terrorist acts.
“Lost Islamic History” Firas Alkhateeb.
By the time I had come to this book I had woken up to the use of short cuts in considering how biased a book may me and my short cut was to look at the reviews although this may be a dangerous path to tread as one will only read what suites them. I could find nothing in the standard sources such as the Guardian and the London Review of books and the only reviews I could find were by blatantly biased.
“Heretic” Ayaan Hirsi Ali.
This book has more reviews than I have pimples so I can only assume that she had a great publicity manager. I was disappointed to find that there was no index and my thoughts were if she couldn’t bother with an index I couldn’t bother with reading the book. Ayaan Hirsi Ali is obviously on the side of the argument that states terrorism is firmly based within Islam.
Fields of Blood Karen Armstrong. “The National Arts & Life”
I found the following review of Karen Armstrong’s “Fields of Blood” in a web page called; “The National Arts & Life” It’s the best of the critical reviews.
The review started with the words; “Wishful thinking: Karen Armstrong continues her quest to absolve religion from playing any role in violence.”
“Modern society has made a scapegoat of faith,” she argues in the book’s introduction, and then uses the rest of Fields of Blood to debunk the notion that religion is exclusively or excessively responsible for the world’s ills.
“The Early Islamic Conquests” Fred Donner.
By then I had come across a mention of Fred Donner’s possibly in Wikipedia that stated, “The Early Islamic Conquests” (1981) has been described as "magisterial" and "a major contribution to the understanding of early Islamic history so I intend to buy that.
Hagarism: The Making of the Islamic World. Patricia Crone
The reviews on this looked good and I was impressed until I saw that it was being offered at the nonsensical price of £200.00 plus but what really killed it was the most vindictive and simplistic review I have ever read based on her dislike for Fred Donners attitude to Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians.
She wrote, “Fred Donner, a signer of collective denunciations of Israel, and for years a "scholar of Islam" who loyally accepted the Received Version of Islam has come to realize that he's missed the boat, missed all kinds of boats.” It carried on in the same twisted way a little longer before I switched it off.
“Destiny Disrupted”. Tamim Ansary
This looks good and the reviews give me a feeling of optimism so thank you for pointing it my way and I hope that other recommendations on this subject comes my way.
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Old May 20th, 2016, 07:55 AM   #4
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Start from the founder.

http://www.amazon.com/Ar-Raheeq-Al-M...ews/1591440718
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Old May 20th, 2016, 10:48 AM   #5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BML View Post
I recently decided that I should try to understand Islamic history and its involvement in terrorism but found the books that I bought very disappointing due to blatant bias so I decided to read the reviews before I bought anything else and I came across, "Hagarism: The Making of the Islamic World" Patricia Crow. Although it was written nearly 40 years ago it is offered for sale at around £200.00 which is outside my reach so can anyone suggest the sort of book I should be looking for as I attempt to understand what is a much more complex matter than it first appears?
Here is a visual presentation of the History of Islam,

[ame]www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiozExuqYDA[/ame]
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Old June 29th, 2016, 04:06 PM   #6

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Arabs_in_History

Best book I know to understand Islam (in a Historical perspective, not theological or doctrinal) from the begin to the XX century.
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Old June 30th, 2016, 01:32 AM   #7
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Many thanks.
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Old June 30th, 2016, 06:43 AM   #8
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The violence and intolerance that plague the Islamic world have deep roots and are based on the life and deeds of Mohammed. So a rational understanding of how he lived and founded and preached Islam is important. Here is such a book:
https://www.amazon.com/Twenty-Three-...words=23+years
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Old June 30th, 2016, 07:41 AM   #9
BML
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Many many thanks. I have started reading some of the books I have found and it is a most complex story if it not insulting to call history by such a title.
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