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Old December 4th, 2012, 10:29 AM   #1

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books on evolutionary history


I read Guns , Germs and steel and it was very interesting .
The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution is next in my list .
So can anyone suggest some other similar books ?
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Old December 4th, 2012, 10:53 AM   #2

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If you are not only interested in human evolution, you could try:

- The Ancestor’s Tale: A Pilgrimage to the Dawn of Life. - Richard Dawkins
Ancestors_tale Ancestors_tale


- Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History - Stephen Jay Gould
Wonderful Life (book) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Both are really great.
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Old December 4th, 2012, 11:22 AM   #3

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1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created: Charles C. Mann: Amazon.com: Kindle Store
1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created: Charles C. Mann: Amazon.com: Kindle Store


Quote:
More than 200 million years ago, geological forces split apart the continents. Isolated from each other, the two halves of the world developed radically different suites of plants and animals. When Christopher Columbus set foot in the Americas, he ended that separation at a stroke. Driven by the economic goal of establishing trade with China, he accidentally set off an ecological convulsion as European vessels carried thousands of species to new homes across the oceans.

The Columbian Exchange, as researchers call it, is the reason there are tomatoes in Italy, oranges in Florida, chocolates in Switzerland, and chili peppers in Thailand. More important, creatures the colonists knew nothing about hitched along for the ride. Earthworms, mosquitoes, and cockroaches; honeybees, dandelions, and African grasses; bacteria, fungi, and viruses; rats of every description—all of them rushed like eager tourists into lands that had never seen their like before, changing lives and landscapes across the planet.

Eight decades after Columbus, a Spaniard named Legazpi succeeded where Columbus had failed. He sailed west to establish continual trade with China, then the richest, most powerful country in the world. In Manila, a city Legazpi founded, silver from the Americas, mined by African and Indian slaves, was sold to Asians in return for silk for Europeans. It was the first time that goods and people from every corner of the globe were connected in a single worldwide exchange. Much as Columbus created a new world biologically, Legazpi and the Spanish empire he served created a new world economically.

As Charles C. Mann shows, the Columbian Exchange underlies much of subsequent human history. Presenting the latest research by ecologists, anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians, Mann shows how the creation of this worldwide network of ecological and economic exchange fostered the rise of Europe, devastated imperial China, convulsed Africa, and for two centuries made Mexico City—where Asia, Europe, and the new frontier of the Americas dynamically interacted—the center of the world. In such encounters, he uncovers the germ of today’s fiercest political disputes, from immigration to trade policy to culture wars.

In 1493, Charles Mann gives us an eye-opening scientific interpretation of our past, unequaled in its authority and fascination.
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Old December 4th, 2012, 11:25 AM   #4

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Quote:
Originally Posted by manas teja View Post
I read Guns , Germs and steel and it was very interesting .
The 10,000 Year Explosion: How Civilization Accelerated Human Evolution is next in my list .
So can anyone suggest some other similar books ?
Somewhere I should have a very large list of book with some titles of relevance in it...I suspect.
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Old December 4th, 2012, 01:50 PM   #5

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Here are two works strictly on human evolution: Richard Leakey/Roger Lewan's Origins. The newer edition of Chris Stringer/Peter Andrews' The Complete World of Human Evolution was also pretty good, though it focused a bit heavy on the evolution of great ape lineages going back to the 14 million year old primate ancestors.

One I haven't read, but plan to:

The Dawn of Human Culture: Richard G. Klein: 9780471252528: Amazon.com: Books
The Dawn of Human Culture: Richard G. Klein: 9780471252528: Amazon.com: Books


Last edited by Star; December 4th, 2012 at 01:58 PM.
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Old December 4th, 2012, 04:35 PM   #6

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamWeaver View Post
Somewhere I should have a very large list of book with some titles of relevance in it...I suspect.
then please put their names here , I'd be happy to know them !
Thanks in advance
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Old December 4th, 2012, 04:37 PM   #7

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Thank you History Chick , Omar Giggle , star of Genoa . I appreciate it
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Old December 11th, 2012, 08:46 AM   #9

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Originally Posted by Mike McClure View Post
nope ..... but now I know ...thank you
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