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Old October 22nd, 2017, 01:09 PM   #11

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It was beautiful to watch, but rubbish; particularly with regard to the nature of her relationship with Lord Melbourne. I agree, her story was as good as any fiction anyhow, so why on earth did they have to mess around with it in that way?
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Old October 22nd, 2017, 02:29 PM   #12
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stevev,

Thanks for the info.
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Old October 25th, 2017, 12:04 PM   #13
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It was beautiful to watch, but rubbish; particularly with regard to the nature of her relationship with Lord Melbourne. I agree, her story was as good as any fiction anyhow, so why on earth did they have to mess around with it in that way?
Ratings. I've read that "Vicborne" was very popular with a certain segment of the audience who were not much interested in historical fidelity. When I watched the cringe worthy scene, I didn't hear anything about marriage. It sounded more like a proposition than a proposal. Naughty girl!

Not only was V's life dramatic, it was probably the best documented of any prominant historic figure: 140 volumes of her diaries alone (although many destroyed), plus official and private correspondance all totaling some 60 million words. The Berlin post office asked her to stop sending so many letters to her daughter "Vickie", the Crown Princess of Prussia.

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Old November 16th, 2017, 03:49 PM   #14
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This 1975 British drama seems ro respect history more than itv Victoria. It's in 13 episodes, each with two parts, but "Bertie" doesn't get to be king Edward VII until episode 10. I chose episode 6 because it features most of the interesting characters in the series. It takes place a few years after Prince Albert's death from around 1867 to 1871. The characters are well played IMO. It doesn't match "Victoria's" production quality and has less "drama" it but has more humor and better actors.


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Old January 7th, 2018, 11:33 PM   #15
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Did Queen Victoria really save Prince Albert from a frozen lake? ITV, PBS Masterpiece in the US, BBC First in Australia, TV NZ1 - Radio Times

Apparently Victoria did really rescue Albert after he fell through the ice as depicted in the Season 2 Christmas episode. In real life Victoria linked herself with her lady Ms Murray after quickly calming her down and pulled Albert out. He was not under the ice as depicted in the drama. It was described in V's diary.
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Old January 8th, 2018, 12:06 AM   #16

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The Berlin post office asked her to stop sending so many letters to her daughter "Vickie", the Crown Princess of Prussia.
Really ?
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Old January 8th, 2018, 12:19 AM   #17

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Then Albert goes and dies on her and she goes into the deepest, longest, most morbid mourning the world has ever seen! Of course she finds time for a certain Mr Brown and later for an East Indian servant while in her 70's.

This is all reality! Why the fiction??
When Albert died she noted in her diary "No one will ever call me Victoria again" which to me illustrates the depth of her despair at her loss.
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Old January 8th, 2018, 02:21 PM   #18
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I had trouble with the rescue from the ice scene because of the lead-up. Albert was missing, there's a palace full of servants, but Victoria goes running around looking by herself, calling in obvious fear. And still, nobody follows her or looks for Albert?

I also had problems with the notion that Victoria would adopt a child and attempt to raise her the same as her own children. Provide for her, yes. Make arrangements for her care and education, yes. But make her equivalent to the royal children of Britain? Seems a Christmas heart-warming stretch.
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Old January 8th, 2018, 03:41 PM   #19
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I had trouble with the rescue from the ice scene because of the lead-up. Albert was missing, there's a palace full of servants, but Victoria goes running around looking by herself, calling in obvious fear. And still, nobody follows her or looks for Albert?
According to the link (post 15 above) both wanted to be alone and eluded their "minders". They had had an arguement and I guess wanted to make up. Instead of privacy, the story ended up in the Times. V did the right thing by acting immediately instead of looking for more help.

"He had not been on the ice more than two or three minutes, when, as he was proceeding at a rapid rate towards the spot where the Queen was standing, and had reached between three or four feet on the water’s edge, the ice suddenly broke, and, instantaneously he was immersed, head over ears, in the water.

“His Royal Highness immediately rose to the surface, when Her Majesty, with great presence of mind, joined her hand to that of the Hon Miss Murray (telling her to stand firm, and to betray no fear), and, extending her right hand to the Prince, dragged him to the shore. Her Majesty manifested the greatest courage upon the occasion, and acted with the most intrepid coolness. As soon as the Prince was safe on dry land, the Queen gave way to the natural emotions of joy and thankfulness at his providential escape.” (Times)

Quote:
I also had problems with the notion that Victoria would adopt a child and attempt to raise her the same as her own children. Provide for her, yes. Make arrangements for her care and education, yes. But make her equivalent to the royal children of Britain? Seems a Christmas heart-warming stretch.
I don't know much about that. The Christmas Special probably will not be shown here until next Christmas. The accident happened just before their first anniversary whereas it was later, I believe, in the drama.

Last edited by stevev; January 8th, 2018 at 05:10 PM.
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Old January 8th, 2018, 10:58 PM   #20
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When Albert died she noted in her diary "No one will ever call me Victoria again" which to me illustrates the depth of her despair at her loss.
I didn't get that at first, but I think you mean Albert and her mother were the only people that could address her as "Victoria" and now they were both gone, having died in 1861. Her uncle Leopold died in 1865 so if she wrote this after that, it would be true, unless Mr Brown called her that. I think he just called her "woman" when they were both "under the influence". He died in 1883. She outlived all but the last two of her 10 prime ministers, three of her nine children and nine of her 42 grandchildren. Her firstborn Vickie survived her by a year.

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