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Old October 19th, 2017, 11:30 AM   #11

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The russian James Bond fought the nazis, his name was Stierlitz



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stierlitz
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Old October 22nd, 2017, 04:39 AM   #12

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I just found out that polish television had too a spy tv series in the 1960s called Stawka większa niż życie (A stake larger than life) in which the main character fights against Nazi Germany in WW2.
It seems that everybody prefered to fight Nazi Germany than americans.
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 11:31 AM   #13
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Soviet films tended to be more motivational.


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Old November 22nd, 2017, 05:15 PM   #14

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The name's Stierlitz. Otto von Stierlitz. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stierlitz

Star of print and picture show, Vsevelod Vladimirovich Vladimirov, alias Maxim Maximovich Isaуev, code name "Stierlitz", was quite the rage in Soviet popular culture, and has retained quite a lot of popularity in today's Russia, as one can read here: Was the Soviet James Bond Vladimir Putin's role model? - BBC News

Fourteen novels written by Yulian Semyonov between 1963 and 1988, six movies between 1967 and 1980, with a seventh in 2009, on top of the twelve-part 1972 television series Seventeen Moments of Spring being a hallmark of Soviet spy cinema.
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Old November 22nd, 2017, 07:39 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TupSum View Post
The russian James Bond fought the nazis, his name was Stierlitz

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Old November 23rd, 2017, 12:57 AM   #16
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The difference between these two is obvious. Bond is cold war agent. He captures red agents, skins them alive and then eats the bastards (has sexual intercourse with female ones before skinning process). Better dead and red. Stierlitz character is WWII agent, a very hot war & soviets were allies to Great Britain back then.

EDIT: There is no second world's counterpart of James Bond.

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Old November 23rd, 2017, 01:20 AM   #17

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The difference between these two is obvious. Bond is cold war agent. He captures red agents, skins them alive and then eats the bastards (has sexual intercourse with female ones before skinning process). Better dead and red. Stierlitz character is WWII agent, a very hot war & soviets were allies to Great Britain back then.

EDIT: There is no second world's counterpart of James Bond.
I agree. There was no soviet James Bond in the USSR cinematography.
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Old November 29th, 2017, 09:03 AM   #18
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Another chime in from bulgaria here.
We sorta had a James Bond type of character. And it was a pretty close parallel too. There were a couple of books and at least one movie. But it was way back in the 60s or the 70s, and I guess that genre didn't take off.
From memory, I think I rather liked the books, but I don't remember the movie; it was so long ago tho.

So, the bulgarian James Bond's name was Emil Boev.
He went on missions to the west, there were safe houses, guns, networks of agents, recruiting of agents, blackmailing, I think there were gadgets. But it wasn't so hyperbolic, and it was gloomy and darker overall. I think it was closer to Bourne in tone, without the superhuman stuff. Kinda like the earlier Bourne books.

Here's a link to the movie on IMDB:
Nyama nishto po-hubavo ot loshoto vreme (1971) - IMDb - in translation it means: There's nothing better than the bad weather. - it's based on one of the books in the series
Here it is on youtube, but it's in bulgarian:


P.S.
I guess they made all the books into movies
The IMDB of the writer:Bogomil Raynov - IMDb

P.P.S.
a couple of more links
http://www.bpb.de/gesellschaft/kultu...an-bad-weather
https://www.goodreads.com/author/sho...Bogomil_Rainov - I guess there were translations into other languages, and the books were popular in the USSR too.

Last edited by kln; November 29th, 2017 at 09:14 AM.
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Old November 29th, 2017, 11:22 AM   #19

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I guess they made all the books into movies
Once very popular author here - i've got all 4 volume collection of his works

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Old November 29th, 2017, 02:40 PM   #20
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We all know the James Bond british movies or american spy movies with western heroes defending "The Free World" from evil communist spies.
I wonder if the countries from communist block had spy movies with heroes that fought against the evil capitalists.
I only know that East Germany made some series called ''Das Unsichtbare Visier'' (1973-1979) about an est german spy that fought against american CIA and the West German secret services that wanted to destroy East Germany.
Did USSR,Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland,Czecoslovakia,Yugoslavia had James Bond style movies or tv series?
From my country,Romania, I only know about one movie:Sapte zile {Seven Days}(1973).
Soviet movies were not so pulp and stupid than average Hollywood. I've seen lots from both productions and my conclusion is that Soviet production was more mature in average. Soviets were worse in action sequences but less black and white in scripts and were not explaining everything to a viewer with words. As I grow older I find depicting realism as more important than shiny effects.
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