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Old December 7th, 2017, 01:21 PM   #41
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Why does the presence of non-white actors in Sci Fi film even need to be rationalized or explained?
Because the Disney cast represents a considerable deviation from the original Star Wars episodes, while otherwise the plot remains unoriginal to the point of being a self-plagiarism. The inference is that the casting was done with a view to satisfy a multicultural agenda which is injected into the story.

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Do we need to rationalize or explain the presence of white characters in Sci Fi? If not, then why do we need to do that with minorities?
What do you mean with "minorities"? Aren't Africans and African descendants more numerous than Europeans and European descendants?
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Old December 7th, 2017, 01:27 PM   #42

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Well, we can't just have all films be nice wholesome ethnically pure like this, can we, even if that's the sort of thing you prefer to see.



Given that George Lucas put a Rastafarian alien in Episode 1, and he wrote the original movies, he can damn well put whatever type of people he wants in his ethnically diverse galactic empire.
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Old December 7th, 2017, 01:34 PM   #43
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You said that if we are going multicultural, then it's only fair that it goes both ways.
Yes, but I don't see that it goes both ways equally.

In Thor, for example, a Norse god is depicted as a black man.

Artistic license one may say.

Ok, fine. But the same people would cry "cultural appropriation" when a Bantu goddess would be played by a blonde Swede.

There is a double standard.


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On the other hand, the Star Wats setting is supposed to be diverse.
Who says it is supposed to be "diverse"? Have you even watched the original series?
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Old December 7th, 2017, 01:40 PM   #44
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Hollywood never cared about historical accuracy, and frankly, I'm surprised to still see people whining about it.
There is nothing happening by chance in a multi-million dollar production. Everything follows an agenda and Hollywood is liberal to the core (the last conservative studio was Walt Disney's which was sold after his death).
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Old December 7th, 2017, 02:11 PM   #45

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Originally Posted by Aetius View Post
Yes, but I don't see that it goes both ways equally.

In Thor, for example, a Norse god is depicted as a black man.

Artistic license one may say.

Ok, fine. But the same people would cry "cultural appropriation" when a Bantu goddess would be played by a blonde Swede.

There is a double standard.




Who says it is supposed to be "diverse"? Have you even watched the original series?
The Thor movie didn't make the plot about how a black protagonist have to win the respect of his or her fellow Gods due to racism. The black god is neither a primary character nor is his character essential to the plot line. Unlike the 47 Ronin, the story remained true to the superhero genre instead of changing it to one about some black god winning against racism. Race was irrelevant to the Thor plot line, as it should be.

Don't know what you mean by the Bantu goddess, please specify.

The original Star Wars setting had all types of aliens of all shapes and sizes. There are giant fat slug aliens, tiny skinny aliens, giant teddy bear aliens, miniature teddy bear aliens, little green men, etc... It is obvious that the director wanted to paint a diverse setting. The fact that humans were depicted as largely homogeneous is thus probably more due to lack of actor choices of the time. Otherwise the setting wouldn't make sense, for humans to be so homogeneous in a galaxy so diverse. Including more diversity stays true to the Star Wars setting, or perhaps even fixed the setting.

Last edited by HackneyedScribe; December 7th, 2017 at 04:10 PM.
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Old December 7th, 2017, 04:21 PM   #46

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Originally Posted by Aetius View Post
Because the Disney cast represents a considerable deviation from the original Star Wars episodes, while otherwise the plot remains unoriginal to the point of being a self-plagiarism. The inference is that the casting was done with a view to satisfy a multicultural agenda which is injected into the story.
How is it a deviation? Because it includes more actors that aren't white? I wasn't aware that films needed to meet a certain quota of white people in the cast. The irony is that you're guilty of the race-driven agenda you've accusing the filmmakers of possessing.


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What do you mean with "minorities"? Aren't Africans and African descendants more numerous than Europeans and European descendants?
Stop being pedantic. Star Wars is an American film and in the United States people who aren't white are minorities.
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Old December 8th, 2017, 02:17 AM   #47

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Stop being pedantic. Star Wars is an American film and in the United States people who aren't white are minorities.
Although apparently, all the evil Imperials are Engiish...
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Old December 8th, 2017, 03:16 AM   #48

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Originally Posted by Aetius View Post
Because the Disney cast represents a considerable deviation from the original Star Wars episodes, while otherwise the plot remains unoriginal to the point of being a self-plagiarism. The inference is that the casting was done with a view to satisfy a multicultural agenda which is injected into the story.
Star Wars is a sci-fi movie franchise with many different kind of Aliens that appear on the movies, what's the problem to infer a more multicultural cast to such kind of artificial universe?

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What do you mean with "minorities"? Aren't Africans and African descendants more numerous than Europeans and European descendants?
No, actually they are not.
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Old December 8th, 2017, 07:19 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by Aetius View Post
There is nothing happening by chance in a multi-million dollar production. Everything follows an agenda and Hollywood is liberal to the core (the last conservative studio was Walt Disney's which was sold after his death).
Producers aren't adding minorities to their casts out of the kindness of their liberal hearts. Their research showed them that people are more likely to go watch a movie if it has someone in it who looks like them. In diverse markets like US/EU it means having minority characters. Most main characters are white anyway, because they have to appeal to a white majority.

Personally, I don't care if they make black vikings or white samurai movies. Cultural appropriation is bs, and stifles creativity and "outside the box" thinking.
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Old December 17th, 2017, 07:36 AM   #50

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Very few historical movies are accurate.

It's inevitable that more Asians will appear in the American movies. The Asian market has grown to the point that it can't be ignored. The older American movies come from a time when the economy of Asia was much smaller than it is now. China's was not only smaller, there was a lack of contact due to the Cold War. And the increase of travel between the two continents and the availability of the internet is making the two more aware of each other.

Although George Lucas didn't have any Asians in his earlier Star Wars films, he was influenced by Akira Kurosawa. So was Steven Spielberg. I think the reason why Lucas didn't have any Asians in his Star Wars films was that there were less Asians in the US when he was growing up, and the Asian market was much less significant at that time. I think he was just expressing his own world, and there weren't enough Asian acquaintances (if any) to influence his characters. Kurosawa's films were just fascinating and exotic ideas from a far away land that he used in his films. In a way, the Asian influence on the American cinema began a long time ago, but it happened very slowly.

What we won't be seeing in a long time is a movie that depicts China, especially the Chinese government in a negative way. Not even on North Korea after what happened to Sony Pictures.

Last edited by Blue; December 17th, 2017 at 08:08 AM.
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