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Old March 10th, 2013, 07:27 PM   #31
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What's wrong with the series historically? I saw the first two episodes and didn't see anything "unhistorical", besides the disputed sunstone and wood board way of navigation. Other than that the lifestyle of the Scandinavians and the sacking of the first monastery in Britain seemed accurate.
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Old March 10th, 2013, 08:01 PM   #32

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What's wrong with the series historically? I saw the first two episodes and didn't see anything "unhistorical", besides the disputed sunstone and wood board way of navigation. Other than that the lifestyle of the Scandinavians and the sacking of the first monastery in Britain seemed accurate.
Krystian, did you see the recent discovery where they believe they found an actual sunstone in a shipwreck? Just this past week.
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Old March 10th, 2013, 08:24 PM   #33
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Krystian, did you see the recent discovery where they believe they found an actual sunstone in a shipwreck? Just this past week.
From Wiki:

" In order to sail in ocean waters, the Vikings needed to develop methods of relatively precise navigation. Most commonly, a ship was piloted using ancestral knowledge. Essentially, the Vikings simply used prior familiarity with tides, sailing times, and .landmarks in order to route courses. In fact, scholars contend that the mere position of a whale allowed the Vikings to determine their direction. Whales feed in highly nutritious waters, commonly found in regions where landmasses have pushed deep-water currents towards shallower areas. The sighting of a whale consequently functioned as a signal land was near. However, some academics also argue that the Vikings developed more tangible means of navigation. Many claim the Vikings used a sun compass to show their direction. A wooden half-disc found on the shores of Narsarsuaq, Greenland seems to initially lend credibility to this belief. However, upon investigation of the object, scholars found that the slits circumnavigating the disc are disproportionately spaced, casting severe doubts about its role as an accurate compass. Many now hold that the instrument is a “confession disc,” used by priests to count the number of confessions in their parish.[8] In a similar sense, researchers and historians continually debate the use of sunstone in Viking navigation. Recent studies identify the sunstone, with its ability to polarize light, as a plausible method for determining direction. The sunstone effectively has the potential to show the positioning of the sun, even if obscured by clouds, by showing which direction light waves are oscillating. The stone will become a certain color based on the direction of the waves, but the process is only possible if the object is held in an area with direct sunlight. Thus, most scholars debate the reliability and the plausibility of using a navigational tool that can only determine direction in such limited conditions.[9]
Viking sagas routinely tells of voyages where vikings suffer from being "hafvilla" (bewildered): voyages beset by fog or bad weather where they completely lost their sense of direction. This description suggests they did not use a sunstone to aid them when the sun was obscured. Also, they would experience hafvilla when the wind died, implying they relied on prevailing winds to navigate, further supporting the use of ancestral knowledge for piloting."
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Old March 10th, 2013, 08:28 PM   #34

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I'm watching the new one in half an hour
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Old March 10th, 2013, 08:39 PM   #35

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Originally Posted by Krystian View Post
From Wiki:

" In order to sail in ocean waters, the Vikings needed to develop methods of relatively precise navigation. Most commonly, a ship was piloted using ancestral knowledge. Essentially, the Vikings simply used prior familiarity with tides, sailing times, and .landmarks in order to route courses. In fact, scholars contend that the mere position of a whale allowed the Vikings to determine their direction. Whales feed in highly nutritious waters, commonly found in regions where landmasses have pushed deep-water currents towards shallower areas. The sighting of a whale consequently functioned as a signal land was near. However, some academics also argue that the Vikings developed more tangible means of navigation. Many claim the Vikings used a sun compass to show their direction. A wooden half-disc found on the shores of Narsarsuaq, Greenland seems to initially lend credibility to this belief. However, upon investigation of the object, scholars found that the slits circumnavigating the disc are disproportionately spaced, casting severe doubts about its role as an accurate compass. Many now hold that the instrument is a “confession disc,” used by priests to count the number of confessions in their parish.[8] In a similar sense, researchers and historians continually debate the use of sunstone in Viking navigation. Recent studies identify the sunstone, with its ability to polarize light, as a plausible method for determining direction. The sunstone effectively has the potential to show the positioning of the sun, even if obscured by clouds, by showing which direction light waves are oscillating. The stone will become a certain color based on the direction of the waves, but the process is only possible if the object is held in an area with direct sunlight. Thus, most scholars debate the reliability and the plausibility of using a navigational tool that can only determine direction in such limited conditions.[9]
Viking sagas routinely tells of voyages where vikings suffer from being "hafvilla" (bewildered): voyages beset by fog or bad weather where they completely lost their sense of direction. This description suggests they did not use a sunstone to aid them when the sun was obscured. Also, they would experience hafvilla when the wind died, implying they relied on prevailing winds to navigate, further supporting the use of ancestral knowledge for piloting."
Don't exactly know why the Wiki article..just thought you might be interested.
ScienceShot: Sunstone Unearthed From Shipwreck - ScienceNOW
Click the image to open in full size.
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Old March 11th, 2013, 06:26 AM   #36
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What's wrong with the series historically? I saw the first two episodes and didn't see anything "unhistorical", besides the disputed sunstone and wood board way of navigation. Other than that the lifestyle of the Scandinavians and the sacking of the first monastery in Britain seemed accurate.
The expected hollywood clichés in every scene makes me puke
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Old March 11th, 2013, 06:38 AM   #37
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The expected hollywood clichés in every scene makes me puke
What's an "expected hollywood cliche"? There is a "bad" guy? There is a "good" guy? There is an intrigue between the good guy, his wife and his brother? All of these "cliches" are not something hollywood came up with - those are the very basic pillars of fictional storytelling and have been there since people have written fiction. Read any of the classical authors - you will find the same. It is necessary to have this in order to tell a fiction story - and that's precisely what this is - FICTION, not docummentary. If you take all of these "cliches" out you get just another narrative docummentary, and there's plenty of these about the vikings. I want to see something new - a fiction series about the vikings that's made as accurate as possible. And that's how the series is up until now - fiction (because it has those "cliches" of storytelling", but made quite historically accurate.
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Old March 11th, 2013, 11:45 PM   #38
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I have seen 2 episodes and i like it pretty much.
More of such series!
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Old March 11th, 2013, 11:47 PM   #39

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It is a serious improvement over the programming that the History channel has been offering lately.
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Old March 16th, 2013, 04:11 AM   #40

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I am sorry I could not understand why their was references about hollywood and I was looking though some youtube and it seems very much geared to drama.
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