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Old October 3rd, 2017, 07:58 AM   #1
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Obsolete place names


Now and then I run into names of places that I can’t locate by googling, simply because the names have been changed through history. I hope this thread can help me and others locating “forgotten” places.
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Old October 3rd, 2017, 07:59 AM   #2
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Privateering and Piracy in the Colonial Period Illustrative Documents by John Franklin Jameson page 310:
“… who took the said ship about twenty Leagues off of Sabia and Carried us to the Island of Blanco…”


Where is Sabia and Island of Blanco? Obviously, this is somewhere in or close to the Caribbean. The text is from the year 1717.
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Old October 3rd, 2017, 10:18 AM   #3

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I believe that "Sabia" might be in reference to the Dutch island of "Saba", as it fits descriptions elsewhere of Sabia being in the Lesser Antilles.

The "Island of Blanco" seems to be Venezuela's, "Isla la Blanquilla."
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Old October 3rd, 2017, 12:13 PM   #4

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I think that the actual Island of Saba is the one named San Cristobal by Columbus, it is related with the Queen of Sheba (Saba in Castilian), so it can be different from “Sabia”:

https://books.google.pt/books?id=5pQ...C3%B3n&f=false, page 162

There are many White Islands, “near” the "Isla la Blanquilla" that Wolfpaw mentioned there is a Isla Blanca (Venezuela): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isla_Blanca_(Venezuela)

It is never easy to make the connection between old names and new ones, especially in areas that had many changes. Some islands were lost and rediscovered. That is quite common in history.

The book is available online: https://archive.org/details/privateeringandp24882gut, but I confess that I didn’t read it, or investigate if it only talks about the Caribbean.

Apparently the ship “St. Michael” was in a route between Bristol and Jamaica.
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Old October 3rd, 2017, 02:23 PM   #5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulius View Post
I think that the actual Island of Saba is the one named San Cristobal by Columbus, it is related with the Queen of Sheba (Saba in Castilian), so it can be different from “Sabia”:

https://books.google.pt/books?id=5pQ...C3%B3n&f=false, page 162

There are many White Islands, “near” the "Isla la Blanquilla" that Wolfpaw mentioned there is a Isla Blanca (Venezuela): https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isla_Blanca_(Venezuela)

It is never easy to make the connection between old names and new ones, especially in areas that had many changes. Some islands were lost and rediscovered. That is quite common in history.

The book is available online: https://archive.org/details/privateeringandp24882gut, but I confess that I didn’t read it, or investigate if it only talks about the Caribbean.

Apparently the ship “St. Michael” was in a route between Bristol and Jamaica.
I found some old sources as I was snooping; to me, the trick is that these are English sources writing down the then-contemporary English names for these places.

"Sabia" is referenced alongside Antigua, Martinique, and "Barbadoes" by one Captain Affleck writing from Antigua in 1755 as having recently been savaged by a hurricane. (Saba being so close to the Antilles suggests that it is the "Sabia" mentioned.) (Link)

The "Island of Blanco" I figured was Isla La Blanquilla based on the snippet attached to this post from The Real Pirates of the Caribbean - Complete Edition: Volume 1&2 by Captain Charles Johnson.

Clues: Near latitude of 11 degrees, 50 minutes North; about 30 leagues from the Spanish mainland; between the islands of Margarita and Rocas; not far from Isla la Tortuga; island about two leagues in circumference and uninhabited.
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Last edited by Wolfpaw; October 3rd, 2017 at 02:25 PM.
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Old October 4th, 2017, 06:09 AM   #6

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfpaw View Post
I found some old sources as I was snooping; to me, the trick is that these are English sources writing down the then-contemporary English names for these places.

"Sabia" is referenced alongside Antigua, Martinique, and "Barbadoes" by one Captain Affleck writing from Antigua in 1755 as having recently been savaged by a hurricane. (Saba being so close to the Antilles suggests that it is the "Sabia" mentioned.) (Link)

The "Island of Blanco" I figured was Isla La Blanquilla based on the snippet attached to this post from The Real Pirates of the Caribbean - Complete Edition: Volume 1&2 by Captain Charles Johnson.

Clues: Near latitude of 11 degrees, 50 minutes North; about 30 leagues from the Spanish mainland; between the islands of Margarita and Rocas; not far from Isla la Tortuga; island about two leagues in circumference and uninhabited.
Quite possible. In the first link that you posted the author of the book even doubts the correction of the name “Sabia”, as we see in the comment [sic], in the second the proximity with he latitude makes it a possibility.
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Old October 4th, 2017, 11:08 AM   #7
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All the places named "Crestview" where there is no crest and no view. All the places whose name includes "Springs" where there are no springs anymore. All the places named "Longview" where there is no long view. All the places named "Springfield" where there's no spring and no field within the city limits. Etc.
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Old October 4th, 2017, 11:24 AM   #8
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Great responses! I admire your energy in this matter!


Ironically the answer was just in front of my eyes. In another chapter there were notes from the editor stating:


“Sabia or Saba
A small Dutch island, east of St. Croix, and between St. Martin and St. Eustatius.”


“Island of Blanco
An islet among the Virgin Islands, east of St. John, and not far from the Dead Man's Chest. The Windward Passage lies between Haiti and Cuba. Jesuits' bark is cinchona, from which quinine is made.”

Saba is an island in the Caribbean, located precisely where he says.


Wikipedia says that a place today called Bellamy Cay in those days was called Blanco:
“Bellamy Cay, now home to the popular restaurant/bar "The Last Resort", is named after "Black Sam" Bellamy, a noted pirate who captured over 50 vessels in just over a year. During much of his short career, he used this islet (then named Blanco Islet) as his base of operations”

This fits well in with the description that ship was bound for Jamaica. And that it was captured by Bellamy.
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File Type: jpg Blanco2.jpg (18.1 KB, 3 views)
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