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Old January 1st, 2011, 06:50 AM   #1

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Similarities between the "Iliad" and the "Aeneid"


Hello chaps,

For my next term at university, I'm going to be studying Vergil's Aeneid, and my tutor suggested I read both the Aeneid and the Iliad over the holidays as background reading. Unfortunately I probably won't have time to read all of the Iliad, so I was wondering if any of you could direct me to the Books of the Iliad which are referenced most in the Aeneid, so that I can target my reading appropriately? Best wishes, FM.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 09:48 AM   #2

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Why am I reminded of the scholar in Barklay's translation of The Ship of Fools?

I am the firste fole of all the hole nauy
To kepe the pompe, the helme and eke the sayle
For this is my mynde, this one pleassoure haue I
Of bokes to haue grete plenty and aparayle
I take no wysdome by them: nor yet auayle
Nor them preceyue nat: And then I them despyse
Thus am I a fole and all that sewe that guyse.


If you just want to just read enough to "prove" you''ve read it, then you "takee no wysdome by" it. I would suggest you read the whole poem once through to get a good understanding of the story and style. Your professor didn't suggest you study it, but rather to get some background for it.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 11:27 AM   #3

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As an afterthought, the Iliad is the mythological ancestry of the Greeks and the Aeneid is the mythological ancestry of the Romans. IMO therein lies the key to comparisons.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 11:30 AM   #4

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patito de Hule View Post
As an afterthought, the Iliad is the mythological ancestry of the Greeks and the Aeneid is the mythological ancestry of the Romans. IMO therein lies the key to comparisons.
Indeed. Also, I think that Virgil inspired himself extensively from Homer's work when he wrote his.
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Old January 1st, 2011, 01:58 PM   #5

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Is it for literary comparison? In which case I would think the Odyssey would be more relavent, but if its just for more historical/narratological setting then I can see why.

Virgil is better, he has actual and better character development unlike cardboard keanu reeves stylisation of homer.
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 02:06 PM   #6

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Quote:
I would suggest you read the whole poem once through to get a good understanding of the story and style.
I'd like to do so; unfortunately, as I mentioned in my post, I don't have time to read the whole Iliad and do all the other work I was set, so I figured that I'd be able to take more wisdom from it if I read the parts which were most relevant to Aeneid comparisons, rather than read parts which, whilst undoubtedly good to know, wouldn't be as useful as others.
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 02:11 PM   #7

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Short cuts, best thing is to just read it since it is all to some lesser or greater extent comparable.
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Old March 25th, 2013, 11:44 AM   #8
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I think that you have to read Illiad first then move onto Aeneid. If time restraints are a problem I suggest browsing a chapter summary writen in easy to understand formate before reading each chapter of the real text, that way you aren't missing or misunderstanding what is going on. A good site for easy to understand, (sometimes too easy) is shmoop.com. I used this technique of reviewing a chapter summary inorder to read and understand Dante's Inferno.
Hope this helps
www.descriptivephrases.com
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