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Old December 2nd, 2016, 01:50 PM   #1
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Anachronism - what do you do?


I have a pet peeve. Students using false geography terms in history work bugs me to no end.

There is no Saudi Arabia in Muhammad's day.
There was no Turkey during the Greek or Roman hey day.
Julius Caesar did not conquer the French. Etc.

It is not the fault of the students much of the time.

What do you do to correct this bad habit?
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Old December 2nd, 2016, 02:23 PM   #2

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For the most part, it is an indication of a lack of knowledge. Encouraging students to learn history - including name and places, and correcting them when they use current terms for past places, is a start.
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Old December 2nd, 2016, 03:17 PM   #3

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A foundation course in the evolution of polities?
The nation vs. the state?
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Old December 2nd, 2016, 03:30 PM   #4

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Utah Jay View Post
I have a pet peeve. Students using false geography terms in history work bugs me to no end.

There is no Saudi Arabia in Muhammad's day.
There was no Turkey during the Greek or Roman hey day.
Julius Caesar did not conquer the French. Etc.

It is not the fault of the students much of the time.

What do you do to correct this bad habit?
I must say that sometimes I use today’s countries as a reference, for instance, speaking of territories that today belong/are part of Saudi Arabia/Turkey/France.

In this way we can say that Julius Caesar in his campaigns against the Gauls conquered territories that today belong to France.

For many people it is easier to visualize the territories with today’s countries, besides there are names and geographical concepts that change of place during the centuries and are missleading.
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Old December 2nd, 2016, 07:34 PM   #5
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I make sure I tell the students about these differences. It kind of blows some of their minds. I try to fix the stuff that screwed ME up in school.
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Old December 2nd, 2016, 07:35 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Ancientgeezer View Post
A foundation course in the evolution of polities?
The nation vs. the state?
The AP book had about 100 words on William Duke of Normandy which is insane...no way HS has time for that. Great idea though.
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Old December 2nd, 2016, 08:18 PM   #7

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Just out of curiosity, are the students qualifying it with the word modern?

For example, "During the Gallic Wars Julius Caesar conquered much of what is now modern France & Belgium."

I am not a teacher, but would think that should pass muster. It indicates that the student understands that ancient Gaul was not modern France and Belgium, but that it encompassed territory that now forms those modern countries.
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Old December 2nd, 2016, 08:40 PM   #8
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They still tend to think in modern terms, and that is if they can even find the modern country on a map.

I want to write a political geography book for HS and college students.
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Old December 2nd, 2016, 11:11 PM   #9

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scaeva View Post
Just out of curiosity, are the students qualifying it with the word modern?

For example, "During the Gallic Wars Julius Caesar conquered much of what is now modern France & Belgium."

I am not a teacher, but would think that should pass muster. It indicates that the student understands that ancient Gaul was not modern France and Belgium, but that it encompassed territory that now forms those modern countries.
I didn’t use the term “Modern”, it can be an ambiguous term. For instance it has a different meaning in Portuguese/French/Spanish if we compare it with its meaning in English. In those languages, for the historiography, the Modern Period begins with the Renaissance/Discoveries/Fall of Constantinople and ends with the French Revolution, when in English the Modern period is pretty stretched.
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Old December 7th, 2016, 08:30 PM   #10
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Using terms like Saudi Arabia, France, and Turkey helps one to understand what is being discussed. It would be better to qualify them with "modern" though.
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