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Old July 3rd, 2009, 04:47 AM   #1

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What is the best method of requiring sources?


Several of us have talked about internet sources for projects in class. One of the issues is hard copy sources v. Internet sources. How do you deal with "internet books and magazines"? Do you consider them an internet source? How do you go about requiring sources for a project? I tend to require more real books and magazines and limit internet sources.
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Old July 3rd, 2009, 08:45 AM   #2

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Re: What is the best method of requiring sources?


Well it really depends on the source.

Most magazines/journals etc are all available online, sometimes for free, sometimes with a subscription, and even lots of books can be found in their entirety, also often for free. There is no reason that online sources, as long as they are credible, can be used.

Most of the time these are virtually a carbon copy that is put online, sometimes they are ven just scanned right from the source, in those cases you don't even have to site that it was on the internet, so is it an 'internet source'? Tough question, I mean you get it from the internet so I suppose, but on the other hand it's the exact same thing you would find in the hard-copy, so I don't see any problem with that.

It really mainly depends on credibility and that it is in fact a scholarly source, the internet can be great for finding copies of 'hardcopy' sources that would otherwise be difficult to find, but students just have to be careful of what they get online.

Search engines like JSTOR (Journal Storage) are absolutely amazing for finding all sorts of scholarly journal articles online, and there are also lots of free sites like the 'perseus digital library' that stores tons of the ancient sources and links to relevant, scholarly, secondary sources. As long as those sources say who translated it, that's suffiicent and I think should be just as credible and acceptable as any hardcopy version of the same source.
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Old July 7th, 2009, 03:42 PM   #3

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Re: What is the best method of requiring sources?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex III View Post
Well it really depends on the source.

Most magazines/journals etc are all available online, sometimes for free, sometimes with a subscription, and even lots of books can be found in their entirety, also often for free. There is no reason that online sources, as long as they are credible, can be used.

Most of the time these are virtually a carbon copy that is put online, sometimes they are ven just scanned right from the source, in those cases you don't even have to site that it was on the internet, so is it an 'internet source'? Tough question, I mean you get it from the internet so I suppose, but on the other hand it's the exact same thing you would find in the hard-copy, so I don't see any problem with that.

It really mainly depends on credibility and that it is in fact a scholarly source, the internet can be great for finding copies of 'hardcopy' sources that would otherwise be difficult to find, but students just have to be careful of what they get online.

Search engines like JSTOR (Journal Storage) are absolutely amazing for finding all sorts of scholarly journal articles online, and there are also lots of free sites like the 'perseus digital library' that stores tons of the ancient sources and links to relevant, scholarly, secondary sources. As long as those sources say who translated it, that's suffiicent and I think should be just as credible and acceptable as any hardcopy version of the same source.
Not only does it depend on the source, but it depends on the age level. For instance, I wouldn't expect my intermediate students to be able to research in depth. If they find one or two good sources, I'll be lucky...it's more about teaching them to find each source they wish to use. If they learn to verify their sources that's a bonus.
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