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Medieval and Byzantine History Medieval and Byzantine History Forum - Period of History between classical antiquity and modern times, roughly the 5th through 16th Centuries


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Old February 10th, 2018, 08:21 AM   #11
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But should we see the crusades as a so well-defined partt of history?
I am not so sure the wars in the "Holy land" and surrounding parts of the eastern Meditteranean were so completely different from christian muslim conflicts elsewhere (especially Spain, Portugal, Sicily) or wars against the "heathens" (especially in the Baltics) or even, perhaps, campaigns against "heretics".
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Old February 10th, 2018, 09:22 AM   #12
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I am not sure if this is true about crusades to Holy land, but crusades against Balts mostly were shams of German orders. Their true goals were not religious at all, they wanted to create their own country or countries and fact that inhabitants were pagans gave them excuse.
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Old February 10th, 2018, 09:32 AM   #13

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Originally Posted by Fantasus View Post
But should we see the crusades as a so well-defined partt of history?
I am not so sure the wars in the "Holy land" and surrounding parts of the eastern Meditteranean were so completely different from christian muslim conflicts elsewhere (especially Spain, Portugal, Sicily) or wars against the "heathens" (especially in the Baltics) or even, perhaps, campaigns against "heretics".
Although traditionally not considered crusades by the historiography, there were papal bulls of crusades in the Iberian Peninsula, during and after the Reconquista.
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Old February 10th, 2018, 12:30 PM   #14

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I think one inquiry worthy of note would be the net effect of the crusades on the relationship between the medieval Church and secular authorities throughout (predominantly Western) Europe. By the time the last bastion of crusaders were expelled from Acre in 1291, Church calls for nationwide funding programs for endeavors to the Holy Land fell on more and more skeptical ears. In some cases, they were ignored completely. It's not to say that religious fervor had dwindled to an unsatisfactory level among the masses, as wars of faith continued to take place in Iberia and Eastern Europe long after the turn of the millennium. I do mean to remark, however, that this "net effect" was to erode trust, respect, and reverence for the Church at the level of nobles, kings, and other lay officials (essentially those the Church needed most as allies). Such attitude could very possibly have sown more seeds for the religious upheavals in the 16th century.
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Old February 11th, 2018, 12:30 PM   #15

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Originally Posted by a123 View Post
Need help on an open response, and also just interested to see the responses.
I think some of the important impacts are:
1. Trade increasing
2. Merchants and artisan classes emerging
3.Growth of towns and cities through charters
4.Deaths of many peasants causing the supply of them go down; demand stays the same. This results in the peasants no longer being the poorest of the poor.
5.Lots of nobility dies; more land/power to king
6.Feudalism and Manorialism breaks down.
7.Classic Texts such as the works of Aristotle are brought back to Europe; people start asking questions.
8. New architecture such as stone castles
9.Scholarship increases, charter universities founded.
10.Plague devastates Europe;thought to have been caused by trade and rats.
This is only what I learned in school, any other information would be helpful.

- Number 1 definitively. After the 1st crusade, the Europeans set up crusader states (Edessa, Antioch, Tripoli and Jerusalem), had expanded their trade network to the Middle East allowing Europe to receive new items such as fruits, spices, cotton etc...

- Number 8. Yes, after seeing more advanced fortifications in the Middle East, European Nobles decided to make improvements to their own castles, making the reinforced medieval castles we see today.

- Number 5. Not really since at the start of a crusade, very few nobles would actually go on crusade and send the soldiers working for them instead, that was enough for a noble to fulfil their crusading vow. The only nobles I know of who go on crusade are mainly the leaders.

- Number 10. Their probably was decease, but it has never been a major factor throughout any of the crusades as far as I'm aware, definitively not spreading to Europe. The biggest plague to ever hit Europe as you may know as the Black Death was brought to Europe much later after the period of the crusades.

Furthermore, modern ideas of banking were developed through the Templars who introduced the system of cheques.
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Old February 12th, 2018, 04:32 AM   #16

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Although traditionally not considered crusades by the historiography, there were papal bulls of crusades in the Iberian Peninsula, during and after the Reconquista.
Only to try and get recruits

And money.

And settlers.
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Old February 12th, 2018, 08:37 AM   #17

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The first three are more causes of the Crusades than results: By the late 11th Century, Europe was just "getting back on its feet" economically and politically, which led to the preaching of the First Crusade. Prior to that, there would not have been the monetary wherewithal to support a crusade, and the upper ranks of society would have been too concerned about losing what they had to those remaining at home to undertake a risky expedition to reconquer the Holy Land.
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Old February 12th, 2018, 11:27 AM   #18

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The greatest "impact" of the crusades was to break the advance of Islam, giving to Western Christianity the time to develop the techs and the social organization to start the age of exploration and the colonization of a wide part of this planet ... no problem if Ottomans conquered the Eastern Roman Empire ... it was irrelevant.
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Old February 12th, 2018, 12:52 PM   #19

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The greatest "impact" of the crusades was to break the advance of Islam (...)
Wasn't that symbolically attributed to the Franks in the 732 Battle of Tours?
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Old February 12th, 2018, 01:06 PM   #20
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The greatest "impact" of the crusades was to break the advance of Islam, giving to Western Christianity the time to develop the techs and the social organization to start the age of exploration and the colonization of a wide part of this planet ... no problem if Ottomans conquered the Eastern Roman Empire ... it was irrelevant.
Islam wasn't advancing at all at the time. the Crusades arguably lead to re resurgence and unification of squabbling states leading to Islam regrouping and beginning to advance again.
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