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Medieval and Byzantine History Medieval and Byzantine History Forum - Period of History between classical antiquity and modern times, roughly the 5th through 16th Centuries


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Old December 3rd, 2010, 11:47 AM   #1201

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Re: Byzantium and its languages


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Originally Posted by beorna View Post
orange=Slavs; green=greek population
Click the image to open in full size.

Do you considers Albanians as slav?
Avars are not also slav.
Ethnicityof Anatolia is also discussible.
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Old December 3rd, 2010, 11:25 PM   #1202

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Re: Byzantium and its languages


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you continue not to understand what humour means...
should we apologise because the slavic loanwords in Greek are not 1000...2000... 3000... ??.000 like in Romanian....? ...da?
take it easy, pal! it was about the ideea that greeks few centuries ago would had the same adversity against slavs, and slavic words,like today, as you sugested. this is ridiculous! in fact they didn't care if the word would came from north, east, or west. if they all had an adversity, this was turks, and turkish-but even this is debatable.
in fact i have no ideea how many slavic words are in greek, and i don't care.
romanian vocabulary is, indeed(da, da, da, da), about 15% slavic, you're right. i'll think about the ideea to commit suicide latter. on the other hand, you're not alone-italians suffer by same desease like you, as I know. It is a mediteraneean complex: una facia, una razza. it means that everything touched by non-mediteraneeans, sucks. with slavs worked:many slav countries are still weak developped(never speaking about relative recent Hitler theory towards slavs). anyway, in Greece, I think the politic factor was, and is, not at all negligible.
we, romanians have our own adversity against slavs-but from other nature. better speaking slavs have adversity against romanians-we mainly respond. this doesn't means there are not brainwashed romanians as well.

Last edited by Perix; December 3rd, 2010 at 11:55 PM.
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Old December 4th, 2010, 12:47 AM   #1203

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Re: Byzantium and its languages


Quote:
Originally Posted by Efendi View Post
Do you considers Albanians as slav?
Avars are not also slav.
Ethnicityof Anatolia is also discussible.
Avars coexisted with the slavs. Slavs were part of the Avar Khaganate, in the very same way they were part of Bulgaria in 681.
Slavs were numerous, many sources indicate so.
Here is a map of there tribes:
Click the image to open in full size.
You can see which tribes lived where. And you can see how the Avars are called "Avaro-slav Khaganate".
Consisted of Panonian slavs, Abordites, in a few years after 700 AD, the Braniches and Timochans will join the Avars, and when the Kgahanate is destroyed, they will join Bulgaria.
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Old December 4th, 2010, 01:08 AM   #1204

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Re: Byzantium and its languages


strum, do you happen to know from where names of those tribes on the map come?
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Old December 4th, 2010, 01:18 AM   #1205

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Re: Byzantium and its languages


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strum, do you happen to know from where names of those tribes on the map come?
Some of the names come from geographical areas.
For example, the name Timochans come from the name of river Timok. Braniches, comes from the name of the town Branichevo in todays Serbia.
Strymanoi comes from the river Struma (or as the greeks call it Strymonas), which is in todays Bulgaria and Greece.
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Old December 4th, 2010, 03:13 AM   #1206

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Re: Byzantium and its languages


So are they kind of reverse engineered? There are some names in sources but those names on map seems bit suspicious to me for 700.
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Old December 4th, 2010, 03:57 AM   #1207

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Re: Byzantium and its languages


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So are they kind of reverse engineered? There are some names in sources but those names on map seems bit suspicious to me for 700.
Which are suspicious ?
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Old December 4th, 2010, 05:57 AM   #1208

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Re: Byzantium and its languages


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Which are suspicious ?
There weren't any tribe called "Zagorcenians" as far as I know.

And the Milinges and Ezerites which in the map are positioned in northern Peloponnesos and north in Phokida are totally false.
Milinges and Ezerites are recorded to live in the slopes of northern Taygetos mountain, each tribe in each slope, and they are recorded to live almost isolated in the same spot even till the 15th century, in the "Drogos of Meligou" of the Chronicle of Moreas.
Noted that these two Slavic tribes together paid much less "pactos"(a kind of taxation) than their neighbouring also rebellious pagan
Maniots Maniots
, indicative of their population.
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Old December 4th, 2010, 10:05 PM   #1209
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Re: Byzantium and its languages


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I think it is sad if people try to cut off parts of their history, because these parts are dominated or influenced by different ethnic groups.
I totally agree Beorna. It is really sad for people, if not pathetic, trying to chop parts of their own roots.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beorna View Post
Slav history in Greece is not in opposite to Greek history, it makes it richer.
Absolutely!


Quote:
Originally Posted by beorna View Post
Well, purification as a cleaning act may be agreeable and nothing bad. We have such thing in Islandic too. Of course it could be as well seen as cultural discrimination of the Greek Slavs. I had such theme with some others about German and Polish history. It's a very hot theme.
I agree and second that.
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Old December 4th, 2010, 11:25 PM   #1210

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Re: Byzantium and its languages


Quote:
Originally Posted by Psellos View Post
There weren't any tribe called "Zagorcenians" as far as I know.

And the Milinges and Ezerites which in the map are positioned in northern Peloponnesos and north in Phokida are totally false.
Milinges and Ezerites are recorded to live in the slopes of northern Taygetos mountain, each tribe in each slope, and they are recorded to live almost isolated in the same spot even till the 15th century, in the "Drogos of Meligou" of the Chronicle of Moreas.
Noted that these two Slavic tribes together paid much less "pactos"(a kind of taxation) than their neighbouring also rebellious pagan Maniates, indicative of their population.
Maybe you have met Zagorcenians under a different name.
I have tried to find information about them on google, but i just found another map, showing them exactly at the position they are meant to be according the map i posted here.
About Milinges and Ezerites, they are suppose to be on Southern Peloponnesos. Every historical map is somewhat accurate somewhat not accurate.
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