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Medieval and Byzantine History Medieval and Byzantine History Forum - Period of History between classical antiquity and modern times, roughly the 5th through 16th Centuries


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Old December 30th, 2010, 11:33 AM   #1

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Byzantium and its culture(s)


In the ongoing and rather tiresome thread "Byzantium and its languages" it has been posited numerous times that Byzantine culture was "Greek". Before making any sort of wild jump to such conclusions, we need to determine just what Byzantine culture actually was. So, what is Byzantine culture? Can we say that there was a Byzantine worldview? Do the changes to urban structures that we see happening most rapidly at the end of antiquity (7th c.) herald the beginning of a "Byzantine" culture that can be considered separate from that of the Late Antique Roman East?
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Old December 30th, 2010, 02:45 PM   #2

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Originally Posted by Kirialax View Post
In the ongoing and rather tiresome thread "Byzantium and its languages" it has been posited numerous times that Byzantine culture was "Greek". Before making any sort of wild jump to such conclusions, we need to determine just what Byzantine culture actually was. So, what is Byzantine culture? Can we say that there was a Byzantine worldview? Do the changes to urban structures that we see happening most rapidly at the end of antiquity (7th c.) herald the beginning of a "Byzantine" culture that can be considered separate from that of the Late Antique Roman East?
I would like to point to this particular website provided by Paul Halsall and the Fordham University historical staff:

Byzantium: The Byzantine Studies Page

As you pointed out Kiralax, the question of what Byzantine culture actually is a matter of debate. I think Halsall does a fine job of explaining what Byzantine culture was like.

Last edited by Comet; December 30th, 2010 at 03:28 PM.
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Old December 30th, 2010, 03:23 PM   #3

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The above link is a good for some general knowledge on Byzantion.
Especially Dumbarton Oaks is a diamond for medieval Greek studies.

This is my favourite site, the offspring and the essence of a millennium of culture in our monitors! British Library Digitised Manuscripts

And some very interesting articles and various texts about Byzantion,in english and several other languages : http://www.myriobiblos.gr/texts/english/index_en.html

Last edited by Psellos; December 30th, 2010 at 03:29 PM.
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Old December 30th, 2010, 04:04 PM   #4
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Contrary to Classical texts, in my own experience the availability of online translated Roman Medieval sources has always been limited at best.

Any such kind of sources would be greatly welcomed.
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Old December 30th, 2010, 04:15 PM   #5

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Contrary to Classical texts, in my own experience the availability of online translated Roman Medieval sources has always been limited at best.
You're not likely to find much. This is a field where major works in well-studied periods have never even been translated into English (although I do not know what other modern languages you read), so finding them online is very difficult or impossible. A fairly up-to-date selection of what is available can be found in Jonathan Shephard's SMOOTHING THE WAY AND SHORT-CUTS TO BYZANTIUM: TEXTS IN TRANSLATION in the Cambridge History of the Byzantine Empire. It is missing some of the newest stuff, like the English translation of Leo's Taktika, Ioannes Skylitzes and some of Psellos' letters, but it remains a valuable resource. I have a .pdf, if you want it.
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Old December 30th, 2010, 04:56 PM   #6

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Contrary to Classical texts, in my own experience the availability of online translated Roman Medieval sources has always been limited at best.
Roman Medieval sources? translated from latin?

Come on sylla...your bias has no limits...
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Old December 30th, 2010, 05:34 PM   #7

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Originally Posted by Kirialax View Post
You're not likely to find much. This is a field where major works in well-studied periods have never even been translated into English (although I do not know what other modern languages you read), so finding them online is very difficult or impossible. A fairly up-to-date selection of what is available can be found in Jonathan Shephard's SMOOTHING THE WAY AND SHORT-CUTS TO BYZANTIUM: TEXTS IN TRANSLATION in the Cambridge History of the Byzantine Empire. It is missing some of the newest stuff, like the English translation of Leo's Taktika, Ioannes Skylitzes and some of Psellos' letters, but it remains a valuable resource. I have a .pdf, if you want it.
Send that pdf to me when you get the time Kiralax. If you need my email to send it let me know and I will give it to you via PM
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Old December 30th, 2010, 05:39 PM   #8

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirialax View Post
You're not likely to find much. This is a field where major works in well-studied periods have never even been translated into English (although I do not know what other modern languages you read), so finding them online is very difficult or impossible. A fairly up-to-date selection of what is available can be found in Jonathan Shephard's SMOOTHING THE WAY AND SHORT-CUTS TO BYZANTIUM: TEXTS IN TRANSLATION in the Cambridge History of the Byzantine Empire. It is missing some of the newest stuff, like the English translation of Leo's Taktika, Ioannes Skylitzes and some of Psellos' letters, but it remains a valuable resource. I have a .pdf, if you want it.
is that possible to pass it and over here?
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Old December 31st, 2010, 04:36 AM   #9
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Byzantine without Constantine (Religion, marrige & family, politics, military, language, food & drink) is as Helenism withour Alexender.
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