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Medieval and Byzantine History Medieval and Byzantine History Forum - Period of History between classical antiquity and modern times, roughly the 5th through 16th Centuries


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Old January 12th, 2013, 05:46 AM   #51
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Poor old Ethelred wasn't really Unready. The word Unrede really means "bad counsel", in that his advisers were pretty rubbish.
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Old January 12th, 2013, 06:00 AM   #52

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Poor old Ethelred wasn't really Unready. The word Unrede really means "bad counsel", in that his advisers were pretty rubbish.
Especially this one.

Eadric_Streona Eadric_Streona

A Mercian hard man who rose from obscurity.


William of Malmesbury described him as "the refuse of mankind and a reproach unto the English"
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Old January 13th, 2013, 11:02 AM   #53
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Oh, yes! He really was as twisty-turny as a twisty-turny thing!
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Old January 14th, 2013, 08:20 PM   #54

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I was doing a little researching updating among my Ancestry.com research trees recently. And i saw one guy was named Ethelred. It looks like they knew their family tree, since that name is not a normal modern or near-modern given name.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 12:14 AM   #55

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I don't want to start a new thread to mention this tidbit, so I'll tell it here. I was just watching a TV program (forget the name, but it is a series on possible European contacts in North America before Columbus). In this episode, the bottom line was that an Englishman named "Rough" Peter Hurech from Staffordshire was buried in the Arizona desert around 1200 A.D. They showed a gravestone with Runes chiseled into it, which translated to Rough Hurech burried here in this cave (behind the stone). Then the author flew to England at a town in south Staffordshire and found that the name Hurech disappeared from the records after 1200. That name looks to me somewhat Welsh, and he may have been a Briton, rather than a Saxon.

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Old January 16th, 2013, 01:05 PM   #56
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Runes, eh? Which no-one from Staffordshire at the time would have used or been able to read.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 02:39 PM   #57

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I don't want to start a new thread to mention this tidbit, so I'll tell it here. I was just watching a TV program (forget the name, but it is a series on possible European contacts in North America before Columbus). In this episode, the bottom line was that an Englishman named "Rough" Peter Hurech from Staffordshire was buried in the Arizona desert around 1200 A.D. They showed a gravestone with Runes chiseled into it, which translated to Rough Hurech burried here in this cave (behind the stone). Then the author flew to England at a town in south Staffordshire and found that the name Hurech disappeared from the records after 1200. That name looks to me somewhat Welsh, and he may have been a Briton, rather than a Saxon.
Perhaps this is a competiting narrative to the Scottish Sinclair
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Old January 16th, 2013, 05:35 PM   #58

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About that TV segment ^, it said that "Rough" Hurech lived in a pub, and they showed it; it still exists, or its replacement. A pub was the internet of its day, where all the news and rumors were spread (over a pint). I just finished imbibing a chilled glass of Guinness Stout myself (worth the price!)(Mine brewed in Canada under license). Staffordshire is not far from Bristol, where those pre-Columbian Bristol fishermen (supposedly) set out for their secret Grand Banks fishing bonanza.

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Old January 17th, 2013, 02:05 PM   #59
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Staffordshire may not be a long way from Bristol by US standards, but it's a very long way by British standards! And the earliest known pub, according to any existing records I know about, is the Trip to Jerusalem in Nottingham, where pilgrims gathered to set off on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. There are various 13th and 14th C pubs, but a pub from around 1200 would be long gone now - or be very famous as one of the earliest pubs known.
And they still wouldn't have used runes.
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Old January 17th, 2013, 02:06 PM   #60
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Also, fishing on the Grand Banks is a very long way from Arizona!
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