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Medieval and Byzantine History Medieval and Byzantine History Forum - Period of History between classical antiquity and modern times, roughly the 5th through 16th Centuries


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Old January 28th, 2013, 12:28 PM   #21
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Did he? I thought Theodora did all the talking

Theodora wore the pants in that relationship. She had guts and saved His throne
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Old January 29th, 2013, 03:20 AM   #22
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The first 3 centuries they wore the same clothes Romans wore, then they switched to medieval clothing that people were wearing in western Europe. So apparently Salah and the rest dislike European medieval clothing.
In my opinion they have a good reason to switch to ordinary medieval clothing. In spite of being much more beautiful than medieval clothing (at least in my opinion), Greco-Roman clothings are long and very tedious to wear, in classical period of time these 6 meter long cloth often need slaves to help put on, they are also inconvenient at work. As the source of cheap slave gradually dried up during Byzantine era people gradually switch to adopt more practical and convenient clothing for economic reasons. Therefore I don't think this transition is exactly due to their "bizarre sense of fashion".
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Old February 1st, 2013, 09:40 AM   #23

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Hagia Sophia
Mosaics from Ravenna
Belisarius
Piazza San Marco from Vennice
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Old February 8th, 2013, 01:16 AM   #24

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Originally Posted by h6wq9rjk View Post
In my opinion they have a good reason to switch to ordinary medieval clothing. In spite of being much more beautiful than medieval clothing (at least in my opinion), Greco-Roman clothings are long and very tedious to wear, in classical period of time these 6 meter long cloth often need slaves to help put on, they are also inconvenient at work. As the source of cheap slave gradually dried up during Byzantine era people gradually switch to adopt more practical and convenient clothing for economic reasons. Therefore I don't think this transition is exactly due to their "bizarre sense of fashion".
There were short tunics too, though.
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Old February 8th, 2013, 03:33 AM   #25

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Bearded people.
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Old February 8th, 2013, 04:06 AM   #26

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....sexual impropriety with fowl.....really.....that's the first thing.

The second thing would be the Hagia Sophia

Ha ha !! I graduated in Byzantine Studies at Queens in Belfast and that page in "Procopious" describing Theodora's leisure time must be the most thumbed down page in any history book?? You can pick up a copy of "The Secret History" in any Uni Library or second hand book store and it never fails!! Always seems to fall open on excactly that page! Thumbed down with the grubby finger prints of generations of students..........Its been giving a cheap thrill to academic pervs for centuries...........Or so I am told?? lol


On a serious note many things come to mind when I think of Byzantium!!
Even the name itself seems almost magical...........BYZANTIUM!!

Ever since discovering the world of the Eastern Roman Empire as a teen it seemed to fascinate me. I think it may be that great realisation you make first encountering the world of Byzantium that the Empire of Rome and the older Hellenic world it supported, never suddenly died in 476 as you were taught in school? Rather it survived transplanted from Rome to Constantinople becoming fused creating something new and equally as exciting. Another aspect that fascinates like most history is that with the benefit of hindsight you know how the tale ends. On this score the roller-coaster history of the Eastern Roman Empire unfolds like an epic novel in many parts, with a cast of characters and plot lines that dwarf even the highest budget hollywood epic, which makes for enthralling and gripping reading. It is the image of a "Greek Tragedy" spread over a thousand year canvas.

From its very beginning founded by the Emperor Constantine a man of contradictory nature if there every was one ? Both brutal and beneveolent. The ambitious Justinian and his dreams for Roman "Renovatio", Belisarius the instrument of that dream often called "The Last Roman General"? Theodora Justinian's Empress consort one of many powerful women who were powers behind the throne, strong willed, seductive, compassionate and ruthless with a colourful past if "Procopius" is to be believed? ..........The noble Heraclius the "First Crusader"and the titanic struggle with Persia. Alexius I a cunning realist who saved the Empire from extinction after the disaster of Manzikert and who inadvertingly set the scene for the "Crusades"! With regards to religion the Eastern Empire would go through what in the west we call "Reformation" on several occasions?

Ultimatley ending with the final defence of Constantinople by the noble Constantine XI, with the aid of characters like the Geonese crusader, adventurer and pirate "Giovanni De Longo" fighting to the last on those ancient walls. There is even a probable "Scotsman"? involved in this last act .............."Johannes Grant" Engineer and siege expert (Perhaps the original "Mr Scott" lol) ...Even the (villain?) of the piece in this final act is larger than life! The young enigmatic Sultan Mehmet II , astride his white charger, cultured, well read in both the Koran and the classics, believing he was the heir to "Alexander" and the "Caesar's" a worthy and enlightened adversary...........who was as much in love and seduced with the "idea" of Byzantium as the defenders on the walls.

Yes to me Byzantium really has it all! Those historical characters i mentioned are but a sampling of over a thousand years of human endeavour, glory, tragedy, farce, some more glory, a wee bit more farce followed by tragedy, more glory, then tragedy again, farce with glory, betrayal followed by you guessed it? another dollop of tragedy coupled with glory, then final tragedy with LEGEND and eternal glory to follow!!

Highlights for me over thousand years of Byzantium!!

1) The impossible but beautiful dream of "Renovatio"

2) Hagia Sophia

3) The walls of Theodosius II

4) The Hippodrome/Nike Revolt

5) Belisarius

6) Procopius

7) Anna Commene

8) Youths dressing up as Hun's and Avars ...surley the ORIGINAL PUNKS ??

9) Heraclius

10) Defence of Costantinople 1453

11) W.B. Yeats
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Old February 11th, 2013, 05:00 AM   #27
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The trmsformation of the Roman based empire into a Greek based empire.

Medieval Greek civilization.

Orthodoxy.

Great emperors like:

Heracleios
Leo III Isaurian
Comstantine V
Nikeforos II Fokas
Ioannis I Tsimiskis
Basil II
John II Comnenos


PS: I don't like the additive to the names of Kopronymos for Constantine V that was given by prejudiced religious historians, and the other Bulgar slayer for Basil II, that's why I left them out in my lst.
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Old February 14th, 2013, 04:28 AM   #28

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other Bulgar slayer for Basil II, that's why I left them out in my lst.
Well, wasn't he a Bulgar slayer? There is no need to be politically correct when talking about history.
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Old February 14th, 2013, 05:42 AM   #29

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Great emperors like:

Leo III Isaurian
What exactly is the great of him ?
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Old February 14th, 2013, 02:29 PM   #30

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Originally Posted by Strategos View Post
Well, wasn't he a Bulgar slayer? There is no need to be politically correct when talking about history.
It's not modern political correctness that's the issue. Basil was only called the 'Bulgar-slayer' under the Angeloi, almost two centuries after his death. Contemporary historians were not very interested in Basil's wars in Bulgaria, either. They devoted much more attention to the civil wars and the wars with the Arabs.
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